High Flow Outside Oil Line

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2012: High Flow Outside Oil Line
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 04:52 pm:

I have had several people ask me about the outside oil line on a picture of an engine I posted on another thread. The oil line is produced by Texas T Parts but sold by most all of the vendors. I believe that they are a very good add on as demonstrated in testing done by Texas T Parts they produce a 1 gpm flow compared with a 1 gallon in 15 minute flow produced by the mag post outside oil line. They come with very good instructions on how to install complete with templates for making the holes in the correct places. I would like to say that I have nothing to do with this product other than I'm a user.






Testing results

application/pdf
T3081Testing.pdf (127.8 k)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 05:41 pm:

This is Terry Horlick's invention. Do not know how the shown rig is attached but some on the kits now on the market have a plate with threaded holes or nuts to go on the inside of the hogs head. It is best to get the proper size allen screws (socket headed capscrews) and thread the hogshead. Those little plates will strip out. It is also ket to locate where the most oil slings in the hogshead to center your pickup area there. I have Terry's original design on two of my T's and have never had a rod problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe bell on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 06:09 pm:

Jim, It was designed by a doctor back in the thirties, the first time I saw it twenty years ago was on a 13 roadster and a 90 year old guy, I lost twenty bucks to the guy on a bet, I showed him my engine with the mag post oiler on it and he told me nothing comes out of them, I thought that was an easy bet so I took it, well I unwrenched the fitting down on the block and fired it up, nothing came out, He won that sucker bet!!!! So I will always remember Jim Tyler!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 06:24 pm:

Joe, same thing with me, bought a running rolling 27 chassis a few years back with a mag post oiler and nothing would come out of it either. I even checked to make sure nothing was stopped up. The TTP part I think is the way to go. KB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe bell on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 08:06 pm:

I for got to mention that Jim had a side oiler on his car that was cast in brass or bronze and was drilled and tapped in the hogs head, so no nuts would come loose on the inside and on the front side of pan had a pipe fitting welded in it for the oil fitting to thread into. He also had a clear plastic line so you could see it flow as soon as it started. He made a believer out of me, I would not run any hills with out one!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 09:31 pm:

The TTP test report showed the Mag Post oiler put out 1 qt. of oil in 3 1/2 minutes, just a similar flow as adv back in the '20's for those mag post oilers.



I think these are good to use, and certainly a necessity, wouldn't tour with a T and not have an outside oil line.



Now, of course, the high flow version off the hogshead, gathering all that slung oil is by far the best deal to really get oil to the front!



Using this on the '27, with a large dia hydraulic oil pressure rubber hose and extra clamps to direct the oil to the front crankcase.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ex trooper on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 09:55 pm:

Hey! Thats a great idea! troop

[IMG]http://i50.tinypic.com/qq362f.jpg[/IMG]


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 09:55 pm:

I think that the "scoop" that mounts to the underside of the hogshead and guides the oil into the line was an excellent improvement to this product.

Dan I agree with you, I think that an outside oil line is a "must have" item. I have them on all of my cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 10:06 pm:

Troop - Looking at the photo of your outside oil line I'm thinking that your line comes out of the fitting from the hogshead at no down angle, it is horizontal to the engine block I would have a concern that while going uphill the oil would not flow very well. Just my opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 10:07 pm:

My modified mag post oiler puts out a gallon in 2 1/2 minutes. That is about six times the normal mag post oiler and I had to cut no new holes in the hogshead.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/210494.html?1305073751

An outside oil line is not required but it is a good back up plan for the original inside oil line.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ex trooper on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 10:18 pm:

Actually,the whole thing was made from a plate and a piece of pipe with the inside of the base fitting (the pipe) being dipped directly into the oil stream directed off the magnets. That line is generally charged with 1-2 PSI depending on the RPM. Its much like the TEXAS T unit, except this one is steel, and I made it. I havent done their flow test on mine, BUT, after she's hot, put that copper line down in the crotch of your fingers and its nice and a warm. The OEM internal line is there as well as rod dippers... its also 1/2" copper with a trans screen and a magnet. Works for me! troop


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 10:19 pm:

I had a mag post oiler that had the mag post removed. My mag was dead. A lot of oil came through it. I have forgotten how much but it was about a quart in two minutes, but then I never run roofing tar in my engines, I run the recommended light oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Thursday, December 27, 2012 - 11:15 pm:

I have been told that the idea for this scoop was taken from my design. As there were similar oilers to mine around before I thought up mine I don't contend that the idea was appropriated from my design.

My design goes on the other side of the engine and incorporates a scoop. I get more flow and about 7 psi pressure in my 1927. The outside oiler is just one part of my oil system. I find that my oiler is a bit of rediculous over-kill. I am sure that with the features on the Texas T parts oil line you can get more flow than needed for most people driving in most locations.

My system was designed to keep my cars running in the mountains and canyons of California. Most folks won't push their T cars in the harsh terrain I do. I just got tired of spinning off rod bearings so I developed a set-up to prevent that problem... and so in the last ten years NO SPUN BEARINGS! It's a delight!

BTW, I also measured oil output from an off the shelf repop mag post oiler... NO OIL FLOW at any speed! I don't want to cut up the rare RHD aluminum hogshead on the 1913 I'm assembling so I am going to try a vintage mag post oiler (pot metal) with an added scoop.... and try to stay out of the hills.

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 12:07 am:

Hey Troop, How about doing an old friend a favor,send me some of those photo's you've got from when you built your outside oil lines. As I recall you had some that showed some pretty good detail and information regarding your step by step build. And I promise all questions I as will be an attempt to make you look like an idiot for building it the way you did. Mostly because I'm not sure if I care for you as a person. However, I think your friend that gave me the ring and pinion and the axles was a pretty good guy. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ex trooper on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 01:14 am:

For somebody that needed a corvette as a, er, speedster substitute (insert your own adjective if needed/desired there), feel free to bash me. If you ever see a burning paper sack on your front porch make sure you promptly try to stomp it out! So there Lumpy LOLOL.... troop


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 01:37 am:

Oooooo, we're getting sensitive in our old age. Maybe you simply need a girl friend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 03:50 am:

Just a word of caution. The Texas T parts outside oiler will not fit a narrow nosed pan without considerable work on the front alloy casting and shifting it back from the indicated position.

Been there, done that!

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 12:25 pm:

Mine was installed by an oldtimer back in 1977 and he installed the business end through the block between 1 and 2 cylinders. I get alot more splash throughout the engine, that way. Jim Patrick

Model T Coupe 011.jpg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 02:36 pm:

There is an early patent on a mag post oiler that I found at the patent office. It shows a scoop much like those pictured on this thread and the thread that Jim linked to. It would seem a scoop was not uncommon on some of the factory made after market mag post oiler setups.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 04:10 pm:

Perhaps the corner garage man was 'ordinarily schooled in the art' as patent lawyers say....


Once pulled this modified Champion spark plug from a tapped hole in the side of a hogshead. The fitting was coupled to a tubing line, and ran down to the side of the motor block and tapped to a fitting there.



See how the plug base was cut half-away to make a 'scoop' to catch the oil slung around the cover, and direct it to the tubing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Prideaux on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 08:35 pm:

I have been hoping a thread like this would come up.
I have a '23 Canadian build. The motor has a pipe fitted but the box does not.
The car came with a spare hogs head that has been drilled and tapped. The pedals on the currently fitted one are in far better condition.
Questions.
Will this set up work?
What is the best way to complete it?
How hard is it to remove the hogs head?
How hard is it to swap pedals and shafts?
I am fairly new to this and don't want mess it up


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 08:53 pm:

A change out of the pedals isn't real hard, if you like to rivet low pedal shafts while the shaft is inside the hogshead :-)

To remove the hogshead is a chore, Bendix off first...then starter..the exhaust pipe, then remove the insp cover, remove the band nuts, spring, and wire the bands in place....etc,,, quite a bit of work :-)



That accessory oiler in your spare hogshead looks like a modified magneto post, someone drilled and tapped the front of the cover to place it there.




Wonder how much space is there for the oiler adapter to fit without touching the coil ring?


Maybe just as easy to buy a new mag post type outer side oil line set up.

That way you keep the current good hogshead in place. The run the pipe to your existing fitting on the block to replace the hollow bolt fitting that comes with the kit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 10:01 pm:

We have used Townsens, in IL. since he started making them 30 years ago. We use a 1/2 " pipe for the oil line.

We put it between No. 1, and No. two rod.

We used to put Mag. oil lines on, until I checked a Motor while fast idle, and didn't get a drip, at all until you revved up the engine, so now you couldn't run fast enough to sell me one of those, what junk.

The Townsen one at idle, with a 1/2" Pipe, will shuck out 2 quarts, in a few seconds.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Prideaux on Friday, December 28, 2012 - 11:40 pm:

Is it possible to fit one of the Townsend types without removing the hogshead?
I am guessing no, but if access is available to catch the shavings with rags and magnets, and grease is used for the drill?
Also, how much room is there inbetween the magneto and front of the housing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Saturday, December 29, 2012 - 02:07 am:

I would never try it, but that is me.


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