How to Remove top coat of paint to reveal original paint

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: How to Remove top coat of paint to reveal original paint
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Friday, December 15, 2006 - 10:18 pm:

From an earlier posting:

By J. Iversen on Friday, December 15, 2006 - 03:44 pm:
I recently purchased a '25 factory PU that earlier received a repaint that is now falling off in rather large pieces. It appears the original paint was actually fairly sound, just faded out. Its appearance also suggests that no surface prep was done prior to repainting. While my preference aligns with Stan and others in the "it's only original once" school of thought, if you do decide to repaint, I hope you'll become studius in determining how to prevent the paint failure I've mentioned. This also leads to a question I have: Anyone had any experience stripping newer enamals without taking off original Ford paint?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By don on Friday, December 15, 2006 - 10:25 pm:

There is a stripper that only removes the upper layer of paint, you have to ask an automotive paint shop for the name or ask the question on the autobody/restoration forum below, you will get a good answer.

http://autobodystore.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?s=1b56549d1a6823acd3da5a5ed2aa70 2f&f=2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael K Johnson on Friday, December 15, 2006 - 10:43 pm:

Natural heat and cold or "weathering" will help it slough off but unfortunately there will probably be areas where it is well bound to the original paint and could remain for a long time so the problem is inconsistent adhesion. Also, if some areas don't come off they might be real thin areas which might be those where adhesion is good. I would be skeptical about how good the original paint is. It is sometimes very hard to distinguish original from repainted areas in my experience, particularly black.

By stripping, I guess you mean chemicals which I have never tried. It is probably doable but sounds more like art restoration project which would be a resource to look into. I would just go slow with abrasive cleaners until you get a result you like. Its like trimming a Christmas tree: when do you stop?

Again, I would be skeptical about getting a good result. There are paint thickness meters on the market which might help if you go the abrasive route.

The best solution for this kind of problem is "rose colored glasses".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By J. Iversen on Friday, December 15, 2006 - 10:58 pm:

Thanks for initiating this Hap. A few suggestions have also arrived via Email. I'm all ears (or is it eyes?).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By willobs on Saturday, December 16, 2006 - 02:43 pm:

If the orig paint was not sanded well. and top coat is flaking off in large size, you might try pressure washing the loose paint off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen on Saturday, December 16, 2006 - 05:38 pm:

You'll have to keep in mind that your car was originally painted with different kinds of paint. The hood, fenders, running boards and such were painted with a very tough baked on "Japan" enamel, while the body was painted with a fragile air cure enamel. The trick will be in finding something that is a solvent for the repaint, but not the original paint. The original "Japan" enamels on the fenders and small parts seem to be impervious to mineral spirits and laquer thinner. Try a small area and see how it works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Money on Saturday, December 16, 2006 - 06:00 pm:

Easy Off oven cleaner. Don't let it sit too long.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger A. Price on Saturday, December 16, 2006 - 06:56 pm:

I remember when I was restoring my coupe, it was almost impossible to remove the japan lacquer from parts of the body. So, I just sanded it and painted on primer for the new top coat. Boy, that japan lacquer is tough
Rog


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By J. Iversen on Saturday, December 16, 2006 - 08:06 pm:

By email, R. Gould's info is similar to E. Hylen's: His use of paint remover did not affect factory body paint on a '17, while the fenders responded to treatment. Also factory paint was resistent on the steering column but a coil box was stripped. Thanks RG--a message to you was undeliverable. Thanks T. Lizzy--couldn't open yours.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Saturday, December 16, 2006 - 08:25 pm:

Glad to see other responses. Sometime in the last 30 years there was an article in one of the Model A Ford club national magazines. If I remember correctly, a coupe had been repainted brown -- not because it needed repainting but because one of the earlier owners wanted a different color. The current owner wondered if it could be returned to the original paint -- and he started very lightly hand sanding with fine sand paper (I don't remember if he used set sanding or not -- but for a lacquer paint job that would probably have worked). At that point he was committed to either exposing the original paint or if it didn't work out to repaint. It worked out well for him. A lot of work -- but he was happy.

Hap 1915 Model T Touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and 1907 Model S Ford Runabout in South Carolina


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael K Johnson on Sunday, December 17, 2006 - 01:29 pm:

Question: Was the undercarriage fender paint and the outer paint the same on most Model T factory paint?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Sunday, December 17, 2006 - 10:40 pm:

Michael,

If you are asking if the paint on the bottom of the fender was the same as the paint on the top of the fender for the 1912-25 cars the answer was yes. They were dipped into the paint and then dried. They probably also dipped the 26-27 fenders but the article only covered 1915-25 and in this case had a note about the fenders being dipped as early as 1912. See Trent's excellent article on Painting at: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/P-R.htm#paint2 which if your question was something else -- the answer at least for the 1915-25 cars is probably there. I hope that helps.

By the way -- I just noticed that your "Mom's T" shown in your profile was probably starter equipped. No side light brackets.

Hap 1915 Model T Touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and 1907 Model S Ford Runabout in South Carolina


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James R. Patrick on Monday, December 18, 2006 - 10:49 am:

With patience, a light touch and plenty of time, lacquer thinner would be the best solvent to do this with, as it will remove just about every type of paint there is. Older, baked on enamels, will eventually come off if lacquer thinner is allowed to sit on it and work, so if a soft rag is used and the lacquer thinner is softly applied in circular motions, it will gradually remove the upper coats as it works it's way down to the original paint. Once you feel you are close to the original coat. work a little bit and then let it evaporate. If you allow it to stay on too long, it will start to soften the underlying layers before getting down to them, so go slow and don't try and hurry it. Jim.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Monday, December 18, 2006 - 11:03 am:

Thanks for letting me know, Mr. Iverson. I have updated my profile to reflect my new email address.
Richard Gould


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, December 18, 2006 - 12:22 pm:

Regarding early paint -

Alcohol will loosen/dissolve the non-baked, gilsonite painted surfaces.

My '17 roadster had been given a coat of shellac by its original owner (it was common for owners to varnish or shellac their cars back then).

I removed the shellac using denatured alcohol and a rag. In addition to removing the shellac, the alcohol "livened-up" the paint. However, I found out if I applied the alcohol too liberally it would loosen and ultimately remove the underlying paint.

Erik Johnson
Minneapolis, MN
17 roadster


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