Me N' Ed's new thread--Homesteader ingenuity

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Me N' Ed's new thread--Homesteader ingenuity
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Thursday, November 08, 2007 - 02:35 am:

Here is one of my favorite pieces.







Another one



Your turn, Ed. Who's next?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London on Thursday, November 08, 2007 - 09:55 am:

I love the tool box!!! Heck, you could even make a few of them up and give em to the wives and sisters as sewing boxes for Christmas!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis on Thursday, November 08, 2007 - 03:04 pm:

I get the tool box, but what is the second picture? Also, what is the device on the fan? Fan clutch? Almost looks like a governor!

I love the tool box!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Thursday, November 08, 2007 - 08:15 pm:

Take a close look at what it's made out of. I didn't get quite all of it in the second shot. There is a rod that sticks out the back of the fan shaft that is connected to the disk in the front. I love it. A guy in Saskatchewan gave it to me for my collection last year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso on Thursday, November 08, 2007 - 08:29 pm:

Timer rollers and I don't get what the valve core remover/tightener is in the oil plug hole for ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Thursday, November 08, 2007 - 10:16 pm:

I think it just is used as a cap on the oil hole.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Iversen on Thursday, November 08, 2007 - 11:47 pm:

My Poppa' was born in a homestead soddy near Hemmingford, Nebraska, 1911 and, by his example, my growing up years were rich in the realization that a lot of useful things could be had from meager resources, at little cost. He applied that to a '23 touring restored '65-66, in my absence (I answered a draft call to Viet Nam) and presently in my keeping. After Dad's passing, I began collecting the "authentic" parts to replace all the things he had effortlessly fabricated from years of experience in building and operating sawmill equipment on the west coast. Curious thing, with a couple of exceptions, I just can't bring myself to replace the larger part of his handiwork. The car, as it sits, is simply too much a solid connection to my father and always a reminder that, during the backbreaking labor we shared, in a family mill operation, producing a much demanded product as post-war CA building surged, I learned important life's lessons that would carry me through the war and other difficult times. Knock youself out getting your project technically correct but, essentially, Melvin Iversen's car screams PERIOD correct! Stan's collection reminds us who these Model T people really were--damn resourceful and innovative folks--the real backbone of who we are as a nation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie in Houston on Friday, November 09, 2007 - 11:33 am:

John, you discription of the home repairs made reminded me of a 1913 touring I almost bought.
It had a damaged right front fender. The repair was to rivet some sheet metal over the damaged spot and wrapping it over the edge. I wish I had taken some pictures of it.
If I had bought the car, that fender would have stayed on the car. The workmanship on that patch was that impressive looking. To me it looked better than a new fender would have.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR. on Friday, November 09, 2007 - 09:18 pm:

Stan -- I love the coilbox tote-all! But like the others, I haven't a clue what the fan is for. Are you going to tell us? Please????????


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen on Sunday, November 11, 2007 - 05:50 pm:

I've found a couple of homestead engineered fan hub governors like that. Here's a neat homebuilt generator governor that I found:
tgov


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Sunday, November 11, 2007 - 10:14 pm:

Eric has it right. It is a fan based governor. What I really like is that whoever built it used two old timer rollers for the fly weights. As it turns faster it pushes on the disk in front which moves the rod through the middle which would adjust the carburetor. I have another one that is commericially made that uses the same design but doesn't use the timer rollers for weights. I love both of these and am glad somebody saved them for all these years so I could put them in my collection to save for another day. I wonder if the museum has things like this or is it all spiffy stuff?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold & Kathleen Schwendeman on Sunday, November 11, 2007 - 10:25 pm:

Thanks Stan - That answers Mikes "what the heck is it" question, however, Steve Tomaso asked about what the valve core remover type valve cap is all about. (???) How does that apply to the mechanism? Thanks,.......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Sunday, November 11, 2007 - 10:27 pm:

Stan,I stopped by there on my way back from Hershey. The museum doesn't have very much small stuff,at least not yet. I'm sure they would apreciate donations.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Sunday, November 11, 2007 - 11:31 pm:

The valve cap is just on there as a cover for the oil hole. Jack, I have a lot of stuff but mine tends to not be spiffy. One of the things they could do (as if they don't already have enough to do) is to start display boards of -- for example -- water pumps. Start with one or however many they have but have room for 50 more. Same with carbs. I'll bet somebody would make up a display of carbs and if they were missing some somebody else would fill in what they were short. Wouldn't take long they'd have a lot of good stuff.
My organization is so bad here I can't find half the stuff I have. I spent two hours today trying to find one of my sales books on accessory bodies. I just knew I had it somewhere. Found it right where I put it. Things like that wouldn't be too hard to put together a display of. Like a collection of Ford Owner and Dealer magazines, Ford sales lit, etc. There is a lot of that around. I just missed a Ford Owner mag on ebay I'd been wanting for years because it had the Montana sheep cover on it. Got to fooling with trying to post some pictures and forgot to watch the clock and I missed it by about five minutes. Old and senile, old and senile. I'll go cry now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce on Monday, November 12, 2007 - 10:33 am:

Willie in Houston - I bought the 1913 T from Paul Sorrell in 2003. It has those patches on all four fenders to repair the cracks. I don't have pictures of the front fender repairs but here are some of the rear. Whoever did the repairs used galvanized roofing sheet and used cut off nails to make rivets. The repairs cover up large cracks in the sheet metal.

My approach to this car has been to remove any non - 1913 parts and replace them with ones of correct vintage while preserving the appearance. The car had a variety of later T parts on it from 1915 to 24 approximately so it was obviously used for a long time. Paul supplied a 1913 engine block with the car which is now the source of power. It gets a lot of attention on tours. I don't think I will ever restore it, it is too much fun just the way it is.

Royce

patchl

13t
carb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Monday, November 12, 2007 - 01:01 pm:

Wonderful car, yes, leave it "as is" -- looks swell.
Hmm, but ya need to "dirty up" them hood shelves, they just look too new! :-)
T'ake care,
David Dewey


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen on Monday, November 12, 2007 - 09:18 pm:

Stan,
Did you catch the timer roller flyweights in the one that I posted? It was made from two generator endplates, an armature shaft, the two timer rollers and a hinged hasp for a padlock.

If all my shop items weren't buried in storage, I'd post a bunch of things like these that I've collected over the years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Monday, November 12, 2007 - 11:59 pm:

Yeah, I did. Here is one of my favorites from my collection.

Here are some things from a book I have showing how to make a lot of stuff.







I particularly like the double rims for "mud work." It is a wonder they survived at all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Tuesday, November 13, 2007 - 10:04 am:

Speaking of accessories, has anybody ever heard of a poltry type cage on the back of an enclosed car? My '25 Tudor came with such a creacher. It is contoured in the back just perfect to fit the rear of the car. It also, is built just exactly like a wood frame model T. By that I mean, it has a wooden frame. The sheet metal has flanges with the little nail holes in the flange and nails just like the car body parts. Anybody ever seen one?

Tim1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Brand on Sunday, November 18, 2007 - 08:14 pm:

Here's a farmer's conversion I saw at a swap meet over the weekend. Andrew.
Grinding wheel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Fultz on Sunday, November 18, 2007 - 11:04 pm:

Here is a wooden pulley to power washing msachines, samll wood saws and etc around the farm. What's left of the label inside the hub states it's for a Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen on Monday, November 19, 2007 - 08:55 am:

The way it's hooked up to that one-lunger maybe it's an after market starter! (grin)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Niedzielski on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 03:27 pm:

Stan, I have found one or two interesting pieces I will take a picture of and upload, once I figure out how to do this kind of thing. Have you bumped into anything in your parts cache you can post ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 05:12 pm:

great thread! I'd post a picture of my Curvlamp that I just bought, but that thread is still fresh so I won't waste bandwidth. A lot of my favorite stuff my wife and I have collected aren't really car-related, but neither is Stan's great-looking box (that my wife would fight you for, Stan:-) ) Please excuse the mess...the house is still under reconstruction.

First, our 1912 Lenzkirk tall clock is one of a kind. We bought it in Germany. It's construction was commisioned by a group of folks and presented to the 3rd Battalion, 31st Inftatry Regiment of the Kaiser's Army on it's 100th anniversary in 1912. On the brass plaque inside behind the pendulum, it tells a bit about it and lists the names of the men in that Battalion (all in German). How it fell into civilian hands is beyond me, but it will never leave here as long as I'm alive! Anyone read German? I had it translated once, but I've lost the papers. It is 8 1/2' tall with the crown.

Next is my 31 or 32 General Electric refrigerator. It still works like a new one, and it stays in our dining room while the two modern units get to stay in the utility. Wife wants to refinish it, I like the original patina!

THe last one you might not recognize, although some of you fellas might be old enough to remember one? It is an opthalmascope. Uses a candle flame reflected off a mirror to light up the eye so the doctor could examine a patient. Only time I ever saw one was the episode of Little House on the Prairie where Mary went to have her eyes checked.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 05:43 pm:

Stan, I wasn't intending to turn your thread into Granny's Antique Furniture Expo. I read all the posts and looked at the pictures, but didn't really catch that the true context of your post was "homesteader ingenuity" until after I posted. Sorry for straying too far from your intended subject.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy D Eyssen on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 11:22 am:

Stan: From what book are your posted photographs? Those are neat. Thanks, Tim


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