Dismantling TT wheels

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Dismantling TT wheels
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Sunday, November 25, 2007 - 12:17 am:

From what I've read, I believe the rear wheels on my 1923 TT are the 25-27 wheels. That's OK. They're round and they turn and they hold up the truck. But they also need painting, and I'd like to take them apart for sandblasting. Before I take out these spokes I want to be sure I don't ruin anything. Is there some particular procedure I should follow in getting them out?
TT spokes


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, November 25, 2007 - 09:58 am:

I myself would not disturb the spokes.I would use some duct tape and blast the best I could around them.You bust 1 spoke,you are done till you find some.And when you find some,if they have any more let me know!The TT wheels are to hard to come by to risk damage beyond repair over a spec of rust.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steamboat on Sunday, November 25, 2007 - 02:25 pm:

I don't believe they could be disassembled without damaging them. On mine I cleaned out the rust as best I could with a wire brush, filing and sandpaper. With that I used Locktite Extend rust neutralizer to stop the rust. After that I soaked the spokes with ethylene glycol, with a little roach killer mixed in, to control any wood rot there might be. After a week of this I let them drip off the excess, filled the crevices and painted. They are now running on their third year and are still as they were when I first did them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino on Sunday, November 25, 2007 - 02:40 pm:

I agree with the others. I did my TT rears about 2 years ago. They looked to be in about the same shape yours are. Once I got the big stuff off with a wire brush, I just used an 80 grit 1" wide sanding strip (actually, several of them). I was able to get in all the tight spots pretty well.

It was slow going, but I was able to get them down to bare wood and metal. They turned out looking good and are holding up great.

I did pull the brake drums off and prep/paint them seperately. However, I did not remove the hubs from the spokes.

Good Luck!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By DaGunny on Sunday, November 25, 2007 - 02:49 pm:

We were able to take a wheel apart using the Regan Spokepress. Just reverse the wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steamboat. on Sunday, November 25, 2007 - 04:39 pm:

I guess I didn't have a spoke press. I did get the hub out however.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, November 25, 2007 - 07:12 pm:

Would the same Regan spoke press work with TT wheels? I was curious about that.
And who makes spokes?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom on Monday, November 26, 2007 - 08:29 am:

Mack, I doubt the Regan spoke press would work on a TT wheel. A buddy of mine and I have done a couple of TT wheels and the force required is a bunch more that required for the car wheel. I'm not sure the all thread rod is up to the task.

We do them backwards, that is raise the felloe and leave the hub on the table. That makes it easy to set the spokes to a reverse tee pee and then we press down on the felloe.

We have done two TT wheels in this manner and four 30 X 3 1/2 wheels. Makes easy work of it. For standard T wheels I'm sure the Regan method works well and every chapter should have one of those available. I just don't think it is up to the task of a TT wheel.

TT spokes are hard to find that are accurate. The last set I got the thickness at the hub end varied by as much as 3/16ths of an inch! The transition portion didn't happen in the same place on any two and I had to put them all in the lathe and turn them back to match the shortest one.

I would like to buy a lathe duplicator one day and make some decent ones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By johnd on Monday, November 26, 2007 - 12:54 pm:

TT respoking, contact the MTFCI TT club, they had a fellow do theres, that they gave away this yr at Hershy, I donated a lot of parts to the project. DON"T try this yourself, as wheels are the safety factor for you and yours and others around you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sebastien Landry on Monday, November 26, 2007 - 01:33 pm:

My spokes need replacement on my 20" TT wheels. I would like to know why not do them myself? The spokes are available from Lang's.

Would it be dangerous for other reasons than they safety factor for you and yours and others around you (same goes for all wheels!!!)

As for the press, can I just increase the size of the threaded rod in order to increase the down force of add a 3rd threaded rod?

Sebastien


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom on Monday, November 26, 2007 - 02:47 pm:

I am sure Lang's doesn't make the spokes they sell for the TT but rather get them elseware. These are the ones I bought a few years ago to do a pair of wheels. I bought 24 and could only use 12. Then a member of our chapter needed a wheel done and he bought 12. With 24 spokes available I was again able to find 12 that would work together (the 12 remaining aren't even close). The length of the spoke shaft from the felloe to the transition area were all different and I then had to turn 11 spokes to match the worst case.

I don't agree with John that this shouldn't be attempted. If you have access to a wood lathe, make your own spokes to ensure they are all the same. Another overlooked item is that an off the shelf spoke won't take care of wear in the felloe if the spoke was loose forever. The wheel I did for a chapter member was badly worn and I had to weld the holes smaller so the spoke would be a tight fit.

This isn't going to be as easy as doing a front wheel but it can be done.

I would make all my spokes long so the hub will have to be bored. The last wheels I did (30 X 3 1/2) we made a snug fitting plywood disc with the exact size hole in the center to fit the hub. With the disc installed, use a flush trim router and your hub will fit snuggly requiring it to be tapped in (it has to be a tap fit into the plywood disc also).

The more folks attempt things like spokes the more knowledge the group has collectively. I can see eventually, a decent manual could be written on doing this job such as the other T books published by the club.

For the same money as sending off your pair of wheels you could buy the tools and do it yourself (repeatedly if necessary) learning something along the way.

Just my opinion


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Tuesday, November 27, 2007 - 11:06 pm:

I tried Mack's suggestion of wrapping the spokes with duct tape. I got one wheel partially blasted today before I ran out of sand, and the tape seems to be working. If the weather doesn't go south on me, I'll finish it tomorrow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Wednesday, November 28, 2007 - 08:17 am:

Just dont hit the wood or it will mark it bad.2 layers of tape or so should do it.Time consumeing,but you will be able to finish your wheels and get on with the project for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Thursday, March 20, 2008 - 05:25 am:

Fellas, I don't have the time to tackle the project at the moment, but I have a large wood lathe with duplicator AND a NOS TT wheel that a fellow member so generously sold me. In other words, I have spokes that are the size they were when new and have never been exposed to weather or rolled with a vehicle's weight on them, and a way to duplicate them. Two out of three ain't bad...don't have the time to put into the project at the moment. Not saying that later in the year I might not be able to reproduce the spokes, but just at the moment I have too many T and TT irons in the fire.

I bought the lathe for just that purpose. I respoked a set of T wheels back in the 80's, and after that I never made another spoke. I guess that would be a project that would potentially return my investment (finally)??

Ray


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Brown on Thursday, March 20, 2008 - 12:29 pm:

I had the same problem but I managed to dismantle mine on a wheel press - the only change was that I used a 3/4 inch threaded rod although I am not sure I needed it as it came apart about the same as a car wheelOne thing was to take it slow, and continually tap the tenons inward so that they didn't catch and jam.

JeffPutting it all back together


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