Painting Miss Gracie......................

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Painting Miss Gracie......................
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 06:47 pm:

Well, Thursday I had to make the decission on which method to use to paint my '25 tudor. I had read, and reread the thread and websites about painting with a roller "the $50.00 paint job".

I had been offered the use of a spray gun, and have a compressor. Which way would I go? There were pros and cons to both. I had a 4 day weekend to work on her, and wanted to buy the needed supplies on the way home from work Thursday. Should I stop at United Supply ( a body shop supply shop) or stop at Tractor supply and go the roller way??????

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 07:14 pm:

Well, since I don't see any evidence of overspray, I'll have to guess that you've been rolling.

Since you probably used Rust-Oleum, why don't you roll it out into the sunlight on about Valentine's Day (when it's finally dry), so that we can take a better look at it.

Just kidding Tim! I think it's looking great and well on its way to completion. You know that I'm all for doing it your own way since that's just more signature on your project. Keep us posted!

Seth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 07:22 pm:

lol...thanks Seth,

Well, enough games...here is the truth. Yes, I did roll the paint. NO...I did not use rustoleum. The UV thing bothered me about it, and the lac of gloss. So, I found the best of two worlds. Tractor supply - tractor paint. It has an optional hardener which I also bought. Total cost was $69.00 for paint, hardener, sand paper, rollers and extra covers, and mineral spirits. 1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 07:40 pm:

Premium Oil - Heavy Duty. Sounds like a good match for a T. I like it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa in Poulsbo, WA on Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 10:00 pm:

Tim,

I must say, It looks more like it does now then it did before. (LOL)

I am glad to see that someone tried the roller method using an automotive type paint. Now I know I can try it too.

Looks great.


Be_Zero_Be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 10:09 pm:

Thanks Bob.
It did come out great, but I owe the thanks to those who came before me and perfected it. I read many places how important it is to keep your paint thin. They mean KEEP IT THIN! If you are having any problems at all, you are doing something wrong. I, at one time or another in the process discovered most of those things! lol

Use VERY THIN paint, wet sand VERY WELL every-other coat, and.....USE VERY THIN PAINT! The inperfections all settle out. Once I learned that they really meant keep the paint thin.... I had very little orange peel at all. If you are getting runs, you are putting it on too heavy, if you are getting orange peel, your paint is too thick...etc. etc. etc.

Good luck and let me know if I can help in any way....other than sanding for you! lolololol

Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Campbell on Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 10:12 pm:

I have been using the Tractor Supply paint by Valspar for over 15 years, mostly on the 12 John Deere antique tractors I have done. The paint is as bright and fresh as the day it was applied. Last year, I painted (sprayed)my 29 Model A black using the black Valspar and hardner and it looks great. I will use it again this year on my 26 T touring repaint. Good stuff at a reasonable price.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 10:33 pm:

Bob,
That actually is how I learned about this paint too. I restored a John Deer "B" about 15 years ago. I repainted it with this paint. When I sold the homestead and moved to town, I sold the "B" too, to a neighbor down the road. He still owns it, and it still looks like new.

Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Sizemore on Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 11:03 pm:

WOW!!!! That looks great. How long does it take to dry before you can sand it? and how many coats did you use

John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 11:12 pm:

Thanks John,
I did the first coat about 3:00 Friday afternoon. It took about an hour to put it on. Then about 8:00 that evening, I put on the second coat and left it over night.

Saturday morning, I wet sanded it with 800 grit which took about 2 hours. Third coat at about 11:00am. Then I put a 4th coat on about 5:00 Sat. night and left it sit over night.

Sunday morning, wet sanded with 1000 grit and put a 5th coat on. I put the final 6th coat on at about 1:00 this afternoon.

The "$50.00 paint job" websites and forums then say to use polishing compound and a buffer. It looks so darn good, I am not sure I am going to do anything more than let it cure well.

Oh, one final note! If you are going to use the tractor paint and hardener, do not mix more than you can use at a time. The hardener, once in the paint has an 8 hour shelf life no matter how well you cover it.

I used left over paint each time on interior wood parts just to use it up and preserve them.

Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 11:50 pm:

Well, I wish I had good things to say about the TSC tractor and implement paint. The stuff I got faded and chalked within 3 months. But it was yellow. I suppose if you don't park it outside for more than a couple of hours at a time it should work.

You'd think tractor and implement paint would be made for outdoor use but it isn't. Or maybe it's this South Texas sun. Oh well. Good luck on your paint job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 11:57 pm:

I painted a 12 foot trailer a year ago,and it sets out 24/7 and still looks great.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 12:04 am:

Ken,
You saying yellow reminded me. My Hovercraft was done with this same paint in "transport yellow". It was in the hot sun on a river or lake all last summer and never showed any sign of chalking, fading, or any other problem at all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 12:22 am:

Yep. I believe the transport yellow is what I used. I spend about six months building this tractor from the frame up. I call it the "Kenbota". I wish I hadn't used the cheap crap now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 01:49 am:

Nice job on the Kenbota, Ken. My experience with most tractor paint is like yours. The best luck I have had with paint has been PPG acrylic enamel. It is cheap, easy to spray, very forgiving and not very toxic to anything. I use a high volume low pressure system from Truman-- the TIP beadblaster people-- that I bought used for 75 bucks about five or six years ago and have hung up everything else permanently including my $350 Binks gun. Enamel in the can doesn't get old if you don't keep taking the lid off to see what color it is. Use a good quality reducer -- the correct one for the temperature you're actually painting at and it sprays beautifully. One tack coat, let it flash and put a finish coat on and you're done.

I've bought most of my paint at auctions where they have a pallet of cans. Best buy I ever got was five gallons of Martin Senyour primer surfacer and several unopened gallon of NAPA and MS enamel plus several gallons of reducers and thinners for thirty bucks. I never used Valspar implement enamel but I've painted my trailer fenders with their industrial enamel and they looked good for about six months. Now they are chalky and the red is more of a red/pink. I'll do them over when the weather warms up. They were supposed to be IHC tractor red. To me, it is too much work to get a good surface ready to paint to then put cheap paint on top of it. It is a lot more work to take that cheap paint off and paint over it with good quality than it is to paint it right the first time. My favorite paint used to be Dupont Duco Dulux Lacquer. You could get a finish that you could see yourself in even if you didn't know how to paint. Spray four or five coats and rub it out.

I hope the roller job works out and the 75 bucks worth of paint still looks good down the road. Let us know how it stands up as time goes on. Might be a big chance to learn some things here and as least for me, I always need that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 01:52 am:

Nother thing. A lot of body shops will GIVE you gallons and partial gallons of paint that they have left over from jobs. Probably not as much since they mostly spray base coat/clear coat now but truck painting places still spray enamel and lots of times they have can after can of enamel that was custom mixed for some truck line and they used three gallons out of the four they ordered, etc. Make frinds with one of the delivery guys from NAPA -- they can find you all sorts of stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 08:06 am:

Tim, I've used lots of Valspar over the years, but it has a different name on the label...House of Kolor!
I don't know the history specifics, as far as if they bought the name or developed the paint, but it is good paint as far as candy (oops! that should be Kandy!)

Looks good buddy!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 09:55 am:

Thanks Ray.

Here is a pic of the hovercraft I put the Transport yellow on. It look great after sitting in the sun all summer last year.

Tim
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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 10:20 am:

Tim, I just sold two Subaru engines back in November on Ebay to a fella from Ohio. He bought them for hovercrafts. Seemed pretty thrilled to gt his hands on'em.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 12:08 pm:

Tim, I think you have more ambition and energy than anybody I've ever known. What's your next project? Rocket ship? I've never even seen a hovercraft let alone have the energy to build one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 12:09 pm:

I had the same trouble with fading using TSC paint on tractors I first painted using it but that may have been because of not using enough hardener. I now spend the big buck and buy automotive acrylic enamel with hardener sprayed with a HVLP gun for both cars and tractors and never had that problem again, pay now or pay later. It's over a $100 a gallon for IHC red plus the hardener but the time you spend prepping the car or tractor, separating parts, masking, and then to reassembling it all again only to have to do it all over in a couple years to me just isn't worth going with a cheaper paint. Not that you will have a problem but I did and having to do these tractors over again takes the fun out it.

A couple of things I do with mixed paint to extend the shelf life after mixing is to put it in an enclosed can and place it in the freezer. I have extended it for a couple days using this method. You have to allow it to return to room temperature before opening since the paint will draw moisture during the warm up just like a cool can of pop would do.

I store all my paints new and ones opened along with hardeners in the refrigerator to maintain longer shelf life. Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 02:57 pm:

Never thought of storing them in the fridge. What do you have for IHC's, Bob? I have a 300 Utility right now but have had several others. I had a 350 Utility I really liked as a tractor but like most of them, it steered really hard with no power steering. It wasn't bad in the morning but by the time the sun was going down I could barely turn it. All my hay fields are little goofy shaped things between the crick and the fence and take a lot of turning with the Moco and the baler as well as the stack wagon. I finally either had to get someting with power steering or quit haying so I quit haying. Sold the 350. I painted these wheels with 40 year old Dupont Acrylic Enamel. Bought a sealed half gallon can at a garage sale for a buck. Hasn't fallen off yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 04:41 pm:

Ray,
Do you happen to remember they guys name? I probably know him. The hovercraft community is pretty tight because there weren't many of us around. That pic was taken at the annual Hoverally in Chillicothe Ohio. It is the hovercraft equivelent of Hershy. Those engines are pretty popular for hovercrafts as are Geo engines. Mine had a 26HP Briggs Twin V thrust engine.

Bob,
I should have thought of that for the paint. I used the same method to extend shelf life of epoxy resin when I was fiberglassing the hovercraft.

Stan,
lol....The hovercraft was my project last winter. I had a blast with it all summer, then sold it in the fall to have money to buy and restore a Model T. I think I am hooked on the "T" thing though. lol getting too old for speed! lol

Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 05:09 pm:

Tim, Maybe you should combine your skills and make the first "Hovercraft Model T"! Henry would be impressed.....Michael Pawelek


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 06:51 pm:

Stan, I have 2-Farmall A's, 4-F12's, a F20, a 10-20 and a TD-9 along with a 23 Fordson and a 400 Case. farmall A


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 07:44 pm:

Bob, you need an 8N to go with that crowd. Stan, I really like your blue wheels! Very nice!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 09:26 pm:

Nice collection, Bob. I sure like those F-12's. My favorite oldie after Fordson. I don't have a Fordson, wish I did but they are like gold here, used to be all over the country and I didn't want one then. I'm about out of tractors. I've had a bunch of Farmall cubs, sold the last one after I tipped it over in the crick. Fortunately, I just stood up and stepped off when it went down, it's a very little creek, I was mowing with the center mounted sickle mower and got too far over the edge with the back wheel. Plus, one of my good auction customers told me I looked like a big, fat kid riding my little brother's tricycle. Probably did.
I'm down on tractors, sold off most of what I had last summer. I only have two NAA Fords (Jubilees) and an 800 with a loader left along with the 300 that I wrecked the trailer on top of. I want to rebuild it but I don't know when I'll ever get ambition enough. I've been buying parts for it. I sold my Oliver, the IHC 350 and 300, three or four Fords and a Case W-30 with a loader and backhoe on it. I still have the Case 320 crawler. Don't have much use for them as I'm not haying and plan on selling the place this spring.
Bob, does one of your F-12's have a wide front end? A friend of mine in North Dakota has one, the only wide front I've ever seen.





Is this you on your Fordson??? =)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 10:57 pm:

LOL... When there's real work to do, I pull out the big guns. A JD 420C and the B.I.L.

1956 JD 420C


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 11:18 pm:

All my F 12's are narrow front ends two on steel and two on rubber. One has a road gear transmission which makes it a lot more useful tractor. Here's one I haven't started on yet and have it out as lawn art. F12

My Fordson doesn't have the factory fenders, they didn't come out until 24 but Michigan required fenders on all their tractors and mine are Lansing fenders. The factory teardrop fenders keep them from rolling back over which was common with the tractor. It has these options, governor, disconnect on the pulley drive and a regular carburetor in place of the vaporizer with a single fuel tank for gas only. The guy I got it from used it in parades and put rubber on the front and removed the cleats on the rear. I have original steel wheels for replacement but haven't taken time to switch them back.

Most of the guys that worked with them are gone now but I remember talking with a couple guys and their stories would have great to put to pen. One guy said, "we owned two of them and wore one out just trying to start it." Another tells of trying to turn one around and ran into a line post which shoved the crank back into the ratchet on the crankshaft stalling it. With it tight to the post and since a Fordson couldn't be pulled because of the worm gear drive they had to jack up the rear of the tractor place two sets of smooth boards one on top of the other so a team of horses could pull the tractor off the post.

Have another dozer, a John Deere 450B, but not too old but still sort of a toy but got the ash trees killed by the ash borer cleared and the stumps removed. Sorry Tim didn't mean to steal your thread. Bob JD 450B


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff rey L. Vietzke on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 11:34 pm:

Me thinks this thread has been HIJACKED by the TRACTOR PEOPLE!!! Not a Model T in sight!!!
Jeff


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 11:48 pm:

OK, tell me what this Model T was painted with.
Your turn, step up and contribute something.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Sizemore on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 11:51 pm:

What T!!!! I just see two blondes LOL I like the blue wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 12:38 am:

What blondes? I see a GMC extended cab pickup!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By johnd on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 12:49 am:

Stan if you need a Fordson 2 reside here in Fulton Mo at my farm, one has a accessory grill guard, Magneto side drive setup, stuck engine, belly mounted sickle mower front axle w/spindles, no front wheels, new steering wheel w/wood circle, 1350.00, 26 model, have another block for the first tractor. also a 1927 model w/fenders not stuck, pully w/handle for neutral?, kingston regenerator, governor, fenders, also w/new wheel for steering wood, all steel good, riad on both need attention, have a new core for riad. 2500.00, lots of misc parts, fans, neck pcs, coil boxs, high compression head, fenders, need repair, steering sector, fuel tanks etc. 573-642-2473


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 02:25 am:

Not supposed to talk about anything but Model T paint jobs here, John, you know that. It offends some people. Anyway, I'm selling stuff, not buying stuff. That's why my 26 Roadster is now in Calgary. With any luck, all my T stuff will be gone within the next year except my speedster. I've sold about ten grand worth on ebay in the last year and will be selling more as I can get it listed this spring. Bout out. By the way, watch your mailbox.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 06:41 am:

No one I ever talked with that used Fordsons had anything fond to say about them once they had moved on to other tractors. My uncle Carl had two of them on his farm in Texas. He'd come up to Minnesota for a month to visit his folks and my dad would go down to take Carl's place. Dad always spoke about the difficulty getting them started and Carl always credited his well developed upper torso to cranking the Fordsons. They were an appropriate replacement for mules is the impression I get.

I don't know if it was just the particular setup with the silo blower but my dad also said that during silo filling season, when the crew came around to fill silo, the front right wheel had to be dug down into a hole in the ground so the belt would clear it.

You could hear a Fordson plowing from 3 miles away according to everyone I talked to. One neighbor talked about some friends who had one that had lost one tooth on the ring gear and you could feel it every time it came around because the worm couldn't pick it up smoothly. I've also heard numerous tales of backing across creeks to avoid the backflipping tendencies of the Fordson. After a few years of wear and tear my father also said you sorta had to "fish" for the gears with the shift lever.

The Fordson was popular because it was affordable. It failed to eliminate the bull wheel on ground powered implements which was always a weak link on loose soil or wet ground.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 06:43 am:

Stan.....
I did a double take at that pic! Those "two blondes" sure look like my daughters Sarah and Emily! OMG....you wouldn't believe how much! Is that Roadster painted with TSC Black?

Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 08:01 am:

Tim, the fella that bought the Subaru engines was Josh Speer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 08:14 am:

I interviewed a man a few years back for a story I wrote for the Model T Times. His dad was a Ford and Fordson dealer in west TN starting in 1921. He said he remembered one man had bought a Fordson from his dad and the next day they gathered every team of mules they could find to pull it out of the mud. He said it had sank almost out of sight in some gombo type ground. He said the men worked for most of the day digging all around it.

After it came out his dad and some of the others commented that they were lucky to have gotten it out. This man was about 8 years old at the time and said it was a big time watching all that with his buddies.

Sadly, Mr. Wilson passed away a couple of years ago. He had plenty of interesting stories and was a pleasure to speak with.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Cullen on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 11:07 am:

Gotta be Centari on that roadster, the right product for the right job. ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 11:49 am:

Stan.....
So, ya gotta tell us....what kind of paint is on the roadster?????????????

Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 03:26 pm:

I guess you need a better view of the paint on the roadster in order to be able to identify it. =)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Wayne Rudzik on Friday, February 01, 2008 - 12:37 pm:

This is a question for Tim who started the string about painting his T with tractor paint.
Tim,
Did you have to put on a primer coat or and undercoat when you painted your T?
I like the look (and yes the cost) of the paint and will have to paint Mis. Priss, our '25 coupe later this summer.
Please let me know what procedures you used.
Thanks,

Joe R.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Friday, February 01, 2008 - 02:20 pm:

Joe,
I had stripped my car down to the bare frame for restoration. I had to rebuild EVERY stick of the old wooden body frame.

I then took each body piece and wire brushed (on a drill) both sides of each body piece. Then I sanded and wiped them off with paint thinner. Then "rattle can" primed both sides (inside and outside) Then I "rattle can" painted the inside with black rustolium undustrial paint. I mainly primered everything so it wouldn't rust before I decided on paint. They say with rustolium paint, it isn't necessary to primer, but with the Verithane Tractor Supply paint, I think I would primer everything anyway. At least sand down your existing paint to a dull finish, clean it good with paint thinner to remove any wax residue, and mist with primer to give the finish paint a good "bite".

Please let me know if I can be of further help. Good luck on your project.

Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Wayne Rudzik on Friday, February 01, 2008 - 03:11 pm:

Thanks Tim,
This gives me an idea on how to move ahead.
The old paint has flaked and come off in chunks and the coat my dad had done in the late 70's didn't stay either.
This will have to be down to the metal and fresh paint. She deserves it.
Thanks again.

Joe R.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Haynes on Friday, February 01, 2008 - 08:51 pm:

Tim, I'm still a little uncertain... when you painted your Tudor, did you have to thin the paint? ;-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Doell on Saturday, February 02, 2008 - 12:32 am:

Tim,
Did you take any pictures of the painting process? I've tried this method on some smaller parts and if the paint is thin enough to not orange peel it runs, and if thick enough not to run it is full of bubbles. Also it goes on so thin that even after two coats if I try to wet sand it it sands right through the paint on any ridge or edge in the part.

Thanks

James


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Saturday, February 02, 2008 - 09:48 am:

James,
I only took pics of each step as it was completed. If the paint was running, you were putting it on too heavy. It is alway FULL of bubbles as you apply it, but if the paint is thin enough, they will pop in just a few seconds. Those that don't pop are quickly illiminated with just a very quick pass of a heat gun or air dryer over them. If necessary, do 3 or 4 VERY thin coats between wet sanding to avoid sanding back through the finish. It took me 4 coats before you could no longer see through it. Then the 5th and 6th coat finished out really nice. You have to be careful on edges, and after the third coat use nothing courser than 1000 grit sand paper....then 2000 at the end. I wrapped my sand paper around a sponge for wetsanding. It keeps it flat on the flat surfaces, but allows it to conture where necessary without putting too much presure on edges.

Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By aaron griffey on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 11:47 pm:

I just lean over and blow on the bubbles. You can use the air nozzle on an air hose too, if you have air.
It is not law that you put on 2 coats and then sand, you can put 5 coats on and then sand, but the sanding will be harder and you'll have to be more carefull.
On hard to get at places you can use a brush without thining the paint and then as you paint & sand you will feather out the edges of the brushed paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Monday, February 04, 2008 - 06:22 am:

Here is another reason for a less expensive paint job!

Yeasterday I put my roof on. While installing the "hide-em" I used a screw driver to lift the flap to cover each nail head. Guess what slipped! Right on the back corner, I put a 2 inch long diagonal scratch right into the paint about 2 inches down from the edge of the vinyl top. Holly crap, I thought. I opened up the tractor paint and used a very tiny little artist brush and filled in the scratch. Then feathered out the edges. It is barely visible, and probably once buffed a few times will dissapear completely. Just immagine if I had just done that to a $3000.00 paint job! Life as I know it would have been over! lol

Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Monday, February 04, 2008 - 06:29 am:

here is a pic of my new roof job....might as well hijack my own thread! lol

Tim

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Monday, February 04, 2008 - 03:29 pm:

Tim, I did a 30 Ford a couple years ago in HOK Kandy Teal with a silver base and gold flames in the base. Walked by the car with a piece of round stock and tripped on an air hose, scratched the paint right across one of the flame licks. You wanna talk about SICK! Candy paint is almost impossible to match, and when it involves a 2-color base the difficulty in increased exponentially!

You did good, buddy...you did good!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Monday, February 04, 2008 - 09:00 pm:

Thanks Ray! :-)

Tim


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