October 1908 Model T Fords

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: October 1908 Model T Fords
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arnie on Wednesday, January 30, 2008 - 06:54 pm:

Since the anniversary of the Model T Ford is coming up this year, I started to read about the first ones and got into trouble!

I was reading about the early 2 lever 2 foot pedal Model T Fords. I do not understand how the controls worked. Literature states that the right foot pedal was the brake and the left foot pedal was the low speed/clutch/high speed.

What I do not understand is the two levers. It appears to me that one lever seemed to have an additional lever that would allow it to be placed in a given position like the later Model T. Is this lever for the neutral/rear wheel drum brakes? Also the second lever seems to be bent at the top, but does it have a method to keep it in a given position? Also is this lever only used for reverse?

Thanks,


Arnie


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Wayne Rudzik on Wednesday, January 30, 2008 - 07:00 pm:

One lever was the brake, as you say Arnie, on the later cars and I understand it worked the same way: Brake, neutral and high.
The second lever was for reverse and I have read that it was a rather clumsy situation. Henry Ford started a program to offer the reverse pedal as an upgrade and I have read that it was so successful that it is hard to find the original reverse levers and Ford had to adapt a regular brake handle for the T on display at Greenfield Village.

Joe R.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Bender on Wednesday, January 30, 2008 - 07:22 pm:

An old man about my age now, when I was a kid, said it was easy to drive the first Model T's. He said you use your right hand on the throttle, your left hand on the wheel, and your other left hand on the reverse level to back up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim McDermaid on Wednesday, January 30, 2008 - 08:09 pm:

I used to own a model "N" Ford and a model "F" Ford, both of these cars had a lever to engage high speed and a foot pedal to engage low and reverse seperatly.

Most cars that used a planitary transmission had a hand lever for high gear.

In the case of the two-lever T there would have been the high speed lever as well as the hand brake.

The model F was a short little lever that came out through the side of the front seat, The N was a nice long lever about the size of a T hand brake

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Wednesday, January 30, 2008 - 09:13 pm:

the 1908 was a model S. the first model T was built october 1908 as a 1909 style. the first 1000 T's used 2 levers as Joseph state.
steve
Cdn 26 coupe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Wednesday, January 30, 2008 - 11:39 pm:

On the model N (and R and S), the left pedal is reverse, the center is the transmission brake, the right pedal the emergency/locking brake, and the lever is low (back), neutral (center) and high (forward).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arnie on Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 12:59 pm:

Perhaps I need to ask the question in another way--What is the procedure (step by step) to obtain low speed, to obtain high and also to go into reverse with a two lever, 2 foot pedal Model T Ford?

How would you tell a person how to operate a 2 floor pedal, 2 lever Model T Ford that was a 1909 Model but made in October 1908??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Wayne Rudzik on Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 01:48 pm:

Not having had the chance to drive a 1909 early T, my guess would be:
1. Brake lever acts as brake, neutral and high gear same as the later T's.
2. Low pedal acts as neutral, low shift up to high same as later T's.
3. Brake pedal same as later T's.
4. Reverse lever, well I think a little more accrobatics might be involved. Probably put the brake lever to neutral then try to back up.
This is how I have always thought it might be done and at the same time try to use the spark lever,gas and turn the wheel.
It may be a snap to those who own and drive an early '09. Let's hear how you do it.

Joe R.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pete Eastwood on Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 02:31 pm:

In the early 60's, at age 10, I learned to drive in my Dad's 2 pedal 2 lever T, serial #714. The brake and low pedals do the same job as any other T. The brake lever only operates the brakes. The second lever, when moved forward engages high gear and it is linked to the low pedal (same as the hand brake lever is on a normal 3 pedal T), when straight up it's in netural, and when pulled back it engages reverse. It's a little awakward to get good leverage to keep reverse engaged.
A little about #714. My dad first saw the car in 1951, the guy who had it, got it from the original owner in 1918. It had it's original Red paint, and the original top and upholstery, and was pretty low millage. In 1953 my Dad was able to buy it and spent the next few years restoring it. We toured the car alot with the HCCA and the So. Cal. T club. In 1965 we sold it to Bill Harrah for his collection.
I currently have 6 T's, one is an '09 #7318
Pete Eastwood


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 03:41 pm:

How many pedals does your hybrid truck have, Pete?

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phil Mino on Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 03:48 pm:

Eastwood


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pete Eastwood on Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 06:20 pm:

Hey Phil, I know where that picture came from! That's me and my Dad in #714 about '62. It still had the original upholstery in that picture.
Pete


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 06:37 pm:

Here is an underside photo of Model T #375 or there abouts. The transmision looks about the same, except the reverse pedal was replaced with a short down below shaft that hooked to the rod that went back to a similar link on the extra lever shaft. It would appear that the 2nd lever would have to be pushed forward to make the car go backwards.

lever


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arnie on Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 08:47 pm:

Pete and James:

Thank you both for your replies. However now I am more confused than before! (I guess that is typical of a Model T Ford person!).

Pete: From your response I get the impression that one lever was for brake operation only. (would the lever operate the transmission brake drum, or the rear wheel brakes?) The second lever was for high gear when in the forward position, netural in the middle and when pulled back reverse. Was low then when the lever was in the middle and one stepped on the left pedal? Also did one of the two pedals apply the transmission brake?

James: I get the impression that one lever need to be moved forward to go backwards. Thus the confussion of how the early 2 lever, 2 pedal units worked, since this is different than Pete's explaination!

Also does one of you remember if both levers had a "ratchet" to keep the lever in any given position. The reason I ask this, is some early pictures appear to me to only have the "ratchet feature" on only one of the levers.

So many questions so few answers!


However thanks for the replys, and perhaps with further comments the true operation of the early model will be explained!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 09:34 pm:

Arnie, I thought Pete explained it pretty well, but the brake lever operates the rear wheel brakes and the brake pedal operates the transmission brake. With the reverse lever in the middle, the low pedal can be engaged. The low pedal can also be engaged with the reverse lever in the forward position. James do you know who owns the car in your picture?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 11:00 pm:

You old SoCalif guys will like this site: http://www.bannerbob.net/Old%20Cars.htm .
About half way down the page are 15 pix of early cars from a gathering at the Santa Anita race track in the late 1950s. I don't see an early '09 in the bunch, but some nifty Ts, regardless.

Banner Bob is an old friend and business associate now living in Portland.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, February 01, 2008 - 02:44 am:

Could this be a 2 pedal T? Pic was taken about 25 years ago at the all Ford show at Knotts.

http://www.bannerbob.net/KTS010.jpg

Here's a much younger Humble Howard at the same show:

http://www.bannerbob.net/KTS005.jpg

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Friday, February 01, 2008 - 02:27 pm:

That was my car Ralph, SR# 220 1909 2 lever. I sold it about 15 years ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend, Gresham, Orygun on Friday, February 01, 2008 - 06:22 pm:

Pete-
It looks like #714 had 30 x 3-1/2" wheels all around?
-Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce McCalley on Saturday, February 02, 2008 - 09:04 am:

If I remember correctly, Doug Eastwood sold 714 to Harrahs. It was a two-lever Ford and Doug let me drive it many years ago. In any event Harrahs eventually removed some of the parts, replacing them with later pieces (the rear axle for one) and it eventually ended up at the Los Angeles County Museum when I last saw it (also many years ago).
Bruce


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 04:06 pm:

Arnie,

If you would like to read the early 1909 catalog see: http://mtfca.com/books/1909cat.htm For information on driving, scroll down to "Control."

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker 1915 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and 1907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arnie on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 05:14 pm:

Hap:

Thanks for your reply. That instruction is was got me started on this whole issue!

It does not state the operation of reverse directly. I understand that one of the levers is used for reverse. I would think that the pedal or if not the foot pedal the other lever would need to be in neutral in order for reverse to operate correctly.

Also I get the impression that one must hold the reverse lever in position (no ratchet hold in any given position) if I am guessing correctly. Therefore my guess is that one would need to hold the reverse lever in position while keeping the pedal in neutral, or have the other lever hold the transmission in neutral if one wanted to go backwards. That would only leave one hand to operate the steering wheel when going backwards!

Please look at the reverse lever and let me know if you think no ratchet exists for that lever.

Thanks,

Arnie


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pete Eastwood on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 06:10 pm:

Arnie:
The hand brake lever only operates the rear wheel brakes, and has a ratchet.
The second lever, when moved forward engages high gear, when straight up it is in netural, when pulled back it engages reverse. There is no ratchet on this lever, you must maintain hand pressure reward to keep reverse engaged. Also, this second lever is linked to the low pedal (the same way the hand brake lever is linked to the low pedal on a normal 3 pedal T) so when it is pulled into reverse, low and high are automaticly disengaged, (just like when you pull the hand brake lever back on a normal 3 pedal T).
I hope this clears things, up if not email me
Pete


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By aaron on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 06:32 pm:

All of that to answer the man's simple question?
Did it get answered/ How do you use the lever?
Put the thottle at a fast engine idle,
with the hand brake 1/2 way back (neutral),
right hand on steering wheel,
tug on the reverse lever with left hand.

You will still have both feet free, one for the brake. Seems pretty simple to me.

Could also use left foot to hold left pedal in neutral instead of using the handbrake lever.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pete Eastwood on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 07:03 pm:

Aaron
Read my last post again. The hand brake only operates the rear wheel brakes,it is not linked to the low pedal. When operating the second lever, the hand brake lever can be straight up, or forward or any where in between. When operating the vehicle in either forward or reverse the only thing you have to do with the hand brake lever is be sure you have released the hand brakes!
Pete


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Tuesday, March 11, 2008 - 09:20 am:

I found this today and remembered the topic.

http://www.earlyfordregistry.com/roorda/roorda.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arnie on Tuesday, March 11, 2008 - 12:36 pm:

Herb:

Thanks for remembering and posting pictures of this 2 pedal, 2 lever vehicle. If this is vehicle #839, this may bring up additional questions!

An October 1908 parts list has a small sheet glued to it that tends to indicate that the first 800 vehicles were 2 lever, 2 pedal. On this web site indications are around 750 vehicles were built with 2 lever, 2 pedal configuration. Others indicate it was the first 1000 units.

Do we have an update from the experts as to how many two lever, two pedal units Ford made before switching over the three pedal, one lever units? Probably this question will come up at some of the 100th anniversary celebrations this year, and it would be good if we all had the same answer!

Arnie


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Tuesday, March 11, 2008 - 06:50 pm:

Arnie,

1. The two lever 1909 T that Herb posted the link for is #337 and not #839. It has that listed on the first photo of the series. The EFR (Early Ford Registry) is also a chapter of the MTFCA that is dedicated to the 1903-1909 Fords. A great resource for early Ford information and nice folks also (blantant plug for our group).

2. The early engines were not as reliable as the later engines and sometimes were replaced. For example the shipping document for Car # 1 is shown at the bottom of this posting. That along with Trent Boggess' research indicates engine # 57 was installed about a month later and engine #2090 was installed in the spring of 1909. So for cars like that you it was a two lever twice and probably a single lever the last time. (see Trent Boggess' article on Model T #1 in the Nov-Dec 2004 Vintage Ford. Also Trent posted some comments on Model T Number 1 By Trent Boggess on Wednesday, October 12, 2005 - 02:16 pm: but I don’t have time to find them using the search function so I took them from the word document I saved. )

3. There was NOT a moving assembly line yet. And engines were assembled, stamped, stacked, and then taken out to put in cars. It is documented that for the later T engines they were not stamped with a serial number until the engine and transmission assembly was completed. I don’t have any solid documentation that was or was not the case for the first 1500 cars or so. Either way it really doesn’t matter. While there probably was not a large back log for the early engine assemblies (or engines and transmissions if they did it that way – which I don’t think they did but I do not know for sure), the engines were not necessarily put into the cars in numerical order. The car was given the number that was on the engine (same number on the data plate attached to the front seat riser). Literally the fist engine put in the stack could be (but would not have to be) the last engine removed. Bruce on page 476 of his book “The Model T Ford” discussing the shipping document cars shared: “Cars were assembled, obviously, after engines were assembled. The dates shown are the dates of the body-to-chassis assembly, a short time after the engine date. In addition, chassis were assembled sometimes days before the bodies were installed. Add this to the fact that there were several assembly areas, and a general mix-up of dates versus serial numbers occurs.”

4 Trent also compiled "The Early Ford Database" in Sep 10, 1997 (available from the Benson Ford Archives and also electronically on Bruce McCalley's CD ("Ford The First Six Years" which is also included on his "Comprehensive Encyclopedia" [ http://mtfca.com/encyclo/mccalley.htm ] between # 1 and #1114. That covers the area that the shipping documents do not cover (see page 478 of Bruce McCalley's book "The Model T Ford". There are appoximately 200 Model T serial numbers with shipping dates listed in Trent's Early Ford Data base that help cover some of that missing shipping invoice area between #1 and # 1118. Trent’s database uses several shipping ledgers (not shipping document, but the ledger that recorded some of the information about the car -- specifically the serial number and where it was shipped to. There are several ledgers missing but the ones that are available list about 25% of the Ford production between 1903 to 19xx or so. In the listing Trent goes up through serial #1114. It is clear from that listing that Fords were not always shipped in order which implies they probably were not assembled in numerical order. For example:
#1 Shipped 10/1/08
#9 Shipped 11/4/08
#11 Shipped 11/4/08
#34 Shipped 11/12/08
#35 Shipped 11/12/08
#36 Shipped 11/12/08
#48 Shipped 11/20/08
#52 Shipped 11/20/08
#53 Shipped 11/23/08
#55 Shipped 11/20/08

And skipping ahead:

#765 was shipped Feb 11, 1909
#799 was shipped 7 days later on Feb 18, 1909
#809 was shipped Feb 13, 1909 5 days before #799.

And the shipping documents also show that, see page 478 of Bruce’s book “The Model T Ford” he shares:

#1244 was shipped Mar 8;
#1245 was shipped five days earlier on Mar 3;
#1250 was shipped Mar 6;
And for the numbers not listed we don't know when they were shipped. Because of the small numbers produced, they are probably close to the time the engine was ready. But what if an engine needed some addition "rework?" And there is always the "human error" factor.
#292 Shipped 12/30/08
#292 Shipped 1/13/09
Did they ship the same car twice? Did two cars have the same serial number? Did the person write down the number incorrectly? And if you did have car 292 which date and original delivery destination would you claim?

5. If the actual shipping documents can ever be located for #2 through 1117 (they might be there some where see Trent’s “A visit to the Stacks” at: http://oz.plymouth.edu/~trentb/HFMGVStacks/Stacks.html there is still much to be looked at and if they are misfiled – with the V-8 stuff – maybe they survived and just need to be found – or maybe they did not) they might unlock some but not all of your question. They often indicated when the first of something and last of something happened. But you would still have to guess at the overlap. The following is an example from Bruce’s book page 480. Again note they are out of serial number order and the old style engines would have been built/shipped in between those dates and probably a little after that date also:

#2,488 shipped Apr 22 was listed as the first thermo-syphon engine
#2,455 shipped May 1 listed as the second thermo-syphon engine and on the next page
#2,456 shipped May 5 as the 3rd Thermo-syphon engine
Note they did not indicate the last old style water pump engine in this list (or I missed it – there goes that human error again).

Respectfully submitted,

Hap 1915 Model T Touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and 1907 Model S Ford Runabout in South Carolina


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arnie on Tuesday, March 11, 2008 - 07:53 pm:

Hap:

Yes, you are correct the number was #337. I had on my brain the vehicle shown on the cover of the Model T Ford Restoration Handbook. I believe it was mentioned recently on this forum that vehicle #839 was on the cover of that handbook.

You bring up a good point with regards to engine assembly. Would Henry call an engine assembly one with or with out the oil pan? If the oil pan was included would the transmission and hogs head also be installed? My guess, and only a guess, would be that the engine assembly would be complete with transmisson ready to install into the vehicle. Perhaps someone has pictures of assembled engines at the factory which would give us an answer on that question.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth H. Todd on Wednesday, March 12, 2008 - 10:49 am:

The way I read the parts books an "engine assembly" was complete, P/N 2990
A "cylinder assembly" was a short block, P/N 2991
A bare block was P/N 3000


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Wednesday, March 12, 2008 - 01:50 pm:

Arnie,

Kenneth is correct -- there is no question about what Ford called the assembly -- that was the bock, head, transmission, pan, hogs head and other items (valve covers, valves, gaskets, crank, pistons, etc).

The part I do not have clear documentation on is when did Ford stamp the engine serial number onto the engine block serial pad? For the 1915 Fords it is clearly identified as one of the steps listed in the "Ford Shop" manual as the completed engine assembly was taken off the engine production conveyor system and placed onto a cart. Bruce has routinely shared that the blocks were not numbered but the assemblies were numbered. But I have not seen any documentation for when that started. I.e. did they start that with engine #1 or did they use a different procedure for the first 10, 100, 1000 or so engines? I don't know and I haven't seen it documented yet (there are "zillions" of pages of documentation that I still have not had the privilege of even looking at, let alone taking notes on). But, as I tried to share in the posting above -- it doesn't really matter. What ever method Ford used, clearly they did NOT number the cars sequentially. I.e. in para 3 above I referenced " Bruce on page 476 of his book “The Model T Ford” discussing the shipping document cars shared: “Cars were assembled, obviously, after engines were assembled. The dates shown are the dates of the body-to-chassis assembly, a short time after the engine date. In addition, chassis were assembled sometimes days before the bodies were installed. Add this to the fact that there were several assembly areas, and a general mix-up of dates versus serial numbers occurs.” " So when and how they stamped the engine won't change the fact that the numbers are mixed up -- and not in strict order (see para 4 for an illustration of sequential serial numbers that were shipped (probably constructed) several day apart with some higher numbers shipped 5 days earlier than the serial number just before it.

All that to say, Ford was building cars and not working to keep an accurate log for restorers in the future. And back to the original question -- when was the cut off for the "two-lever" cars? There is an excellent chance that the evidence at the Henry Ford would substantiate that #839 was an original two-lever car. (It might disprove that, or in some cases it might not provide enough additional information either way.) But if #839 was indeed an original two lever car, then Bruce's comment at the encyclopedia at: http://mtfca.com/encyclo/1909.htm under transmission probably is still ok as he has it written. He shares, " The first 750 (approximately) cars used the two pedal, two lever system. One of the levers was the rear brake; the other operated the neutral and reverse gear. At about number 750 the three pedal system began to be used and three pedals became standard." Note he doesn't say that only the first 750 cars had the two-lever system. Rather he shares starting approximately around car #750 they began introducing the standard three-pedal transmission and then it became standard. Based on the overlap of the water pump and thermo-syphon engines (see paragraph 5 in posting above) they could have easily continued to produce both styles of transmissions for a while. Between the first and third Thermo-syphon engine there were 32 serial numbers and the one shipped first/annotated as completed first was serial number 2,488 shipped Apr 22 and 32 numbers earlier was the #third thermo-syphon engine and it shipped 13 day later even though the serial number was 32 less than first Thermo-syphon engine. They probably assembled other water pump engines during that 13 day period. So I respectfully submit that unless the original shipping documents (which currently are not known to exist) for cars #2 through 1000 are located, or some similar record, and unless they contain an annotation on the type of transmission (two-lever or three-pedal), we will not be able to get a "precise number." And that is ok --. Now if someone shows up with serial number 20,000 and shares it was an original two-lever -- that would take a lot of documentation to convince me. But for those of hundred or so cars near the 750 - 850 or maybe even 900 -- I would think they could have easily have been produced originally from the factory either way.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker 1915 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and 1907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett on Wednesday, March 12, 2008 - 04:43 pm:

FTW, things seem to have become a bit slicker a year later. My Touring #9267 was shipped Aug 17 1909 and, on separating the trans from the crankshaft, the date 8.17.09 was found stamped on the end of the transmission shaft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Wednesday, March 12, 2008 - 08:08 pm:

Jem,

Thanks for sharing that data point. And that is great that the crank was dated. Is it similar to the marking Bruce shows on the crankshaft on page 106 where they were in Roman Numerals made with a cold chisel or with a regular number set?

And for sure as time went on they were getting things rolling along much better. There still was an occasional anomaly. Such as page 486 see Jan 31; Feb 1; Jan 31; Feb 1. He noted the out of order second Jan 31 may have been they forgot to advance the rubber stamp. #20,002 was shipped the day before 20,000 on page 487. But yes in general they were better organized. Thank you for your help.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker 1915 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and 1907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett on Monday, March 17, 2008 - 10:59 am:

Oops, it's so long since I looked at that item, I got the date wrong. The shaft is dated 8 16 09, the car was assembled and shipped 8 17 09. In the photo it may look like 10 but up close it is definitely 16.1909 trans shaft


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Monday, March 17, 2008 - 08:52 pm:

Jem,

Thanks so much for posting the picture with the date stamped on the crankshaft. That date combined with the shipping invoice clearly document that it only took one day between engine assembly and shipping for your car – they are getting faster!

Of course some of the engines may have also been stacked in a room and taken out later? I don’t know how the early Ford Model T engines were handled. Perhaps someone else knows and/or has a reference. But for the 1906 Model N Fords, they apparently used the old stack them in and take them out out approach. See the photo below. I don’t think they looked for the lowest serial number engine, but rather picked the easiest to move engine in 1906. The picture below was used in one of the Ford brochures.



Even with the later Ts there were times when the engine was assembled quite a while before it was installed into a chassis/car see: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/8925.html . And of course the “B” numbered engines come to mind also.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker 1915 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and 1907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett on Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - 10:04 am:

Hap, one point of detail, that marking is on the transmission shaft where it is mounts in the flywheel. The crankshaft has no marking, and I assume that is the original crank - certainly been in there many, many years.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration