Next project

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Next project
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john curry on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 01:49 pm:

got the pully and pin fixed, and now on to the real mechanical stuff. this time i will post a pic first, just to help keep confusion down. sugestions, ideas. been many years since i had to deal with this problem. johnnext problem


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 02:37 pm:

John; Place a washer over the broken cap screw, Arc weld the washer to the stub. Place a nut on top of the washer and weld the nut to the washer, filling up the cavity about half way with weld.

Let it cool and back the piece out.

Sincerely

Jim Weir


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 03:12 pm:

Ditto on what Jim says.
I would add to that,sand blast the area around the screw,and soak it good with penetrating oil for a day or 2.Sandblasting it gives a better chance for a opening for the oil to go in.
When you weld,the current traveling thru the threads from the electrode to the ground helps in it's self to break the bond as well.Take your time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff rey L. Vietzke on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 03:24 pm:

Jim's idea is the best way, and least likely to damage anything. The rest of that bolt is IN THERE, as evidenced by the fresh break. If you don't have a welder, I've used this method: soak with liquid wrench overnight, center-punch the CENTER of the bolt (this will help jar it loose), drill a hole compatable with an EZ out extractor (There is a Snap On set with reverse-cut drills made specifically for this), tap the EZ out into the new hole, and heat the surrounding area with a torch (propane will work). I've used this method many times, and it works, but you need a good eye and a steady hand. The hole should be centered!! IF it still won't come out, you can gradually increase drill sizes untill all you have is a thin "shell",, which can then be tapped inward and pulled out. Good luck!!
Jeff


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 10:40 pm:

Use a reverse twist drill along with penetrating fliud. Sometimes the heat generated by the drilling will back the bolt out,then use extractor
steve


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 10:48 pm:

You can get a basic set of the left hand drill bits at Advance auto parts useally.If you are going to have to drill a hole in it,may as well use it to your advantage.
In a case like this,I would lean alot towards the welding a washer and nut method.
The reason I say this,is because that bolt has been in there along time.Most of the bolts that can be drilled and eased out,arent rusted in as bad as that.And if a drill bit or ease out breaks down in there,oh boy,what a mess.

Whatever method you use,take your time.Dont rush things,any ease outs or drills,hold them straight and use cutting oil when drilling.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 11:22 pm:

Sell your "Easy-Outs" on eBay. All they do is make matters worse. The welded nut method works best. The bolt will shrink at the upper weld portion and break any rust bond. Let it cool then unscrew. You may have to weld it a couple of times if you strip off the nut but it's still the best method when you have this much showing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john curry on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 11:49 pm:

i don't have an arc welder, so i tried to gas weld a nut to the bolt. it will start on the broken piece. just about the time things get close to melting the torch tip overheats and pops. did try just heating the bolt red hot, but no go. the bolt must really be stuck in there. i will keep pestering it and sooner or later. i also cut a slot in the bolt and tried a square blade screw driver and cresant wrench, again with ni positive results. thanks for the ideas. disharted, john


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 11:49 pm:

My opinion on the EZ out is don't. If the bolt is really tight, the taper just expands the bolt and makes it tighter. If you are going to use a method like this, get the straight flute tapered remover, hammer the remover in quite solidly then tap it lightly sideways to loosen it in the hole. Then with inward pressure back the bolt out.

Ken; I have removed bolts when the top of the stub was 3/16 - 1/4' below the surface. The arc deposits on the steel rather than the cast iron.

I have not used wire feed on these jobs so I can't comment on them.

Sincerely

Jim Weir


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir on Sunday, February 03, 2008 - 11:53 pm:

John; Take the block to a welding shop and it will all over in 20 minutes.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Monday, February 04, 2008 - 12:19 am:

I've used the MIG on these and it works. For the deep one's a stick works is better. Yeah Jim, I've done some that were pretty deep too but when they're sticking out this far, there's really no better way. A couple of hits with a hammer and a twist with Vise-Grips sometimes works on these too.

I second Jim's suggestion. Either take it to a welder or an auto garage. They run across these all the time on "modern" cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Monday, February 04, 2008 - 12:25 am:

I'm with Jim and Ken on that E-Z Out thing. That is the worst name that product could have ever gotten.

Seth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeffrey D. Judson on Monday, February 04, 2008 - 05:23 am:

Ditto on the easy-out. I've never really had one work right, and they usually made matters worse. I've done several broken bolts with the Liquid Wrench & welder method, and it works quite well. It is also a good idea to GENTLY heat the block before you weld a nut to the bolt. ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Ward on Monday, February 04, 2008 - 07:47 pm:

Warm with a torch and melt candle wax. Drill and use an-easy out. However use an impact wrench set on a very low speed, just let it chatter. It will get it's way just like a wife.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john curry on Wednesday, February 06, 2008 - 07:58 pm:

how sweet it is!!! got it out today. took my time and worked slow. drilled progressivly larger hole and tapped to 3-8ths. this morning i did a little drilling and ran the tap in and the broken piece came out with the tap. thanks for all the tips. johnbroken end of head bolt on tapgood clean origional threads


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