Water proofing the engine

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Water proofing the engine
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse Encke on Monday, February 04, 2008 - 03:20 pm:

Each timeI get caught in a heavy rain my spark plugs (Champion X's ) short out due to water getting through the center of the hood hinge. Anyone have a simple,neat,non rattling way to prevent this ????


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Monday, February 04, 2008 - 05:55 pm:

Are those smooth sided plugs, or ribbed? I bet the ribs are there at least partly to break up the water flow from top to bottom.

I've driven in real gushers, and never had a plug stop sparking. How did you figure out it is the sparkplugs shorting, and not the coil box?

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 08:14 am:

The only time I've had trouble has been when starting the car after it sat all night in the rain. In that case, I sponge out the spark plug wells, dry off the plugs with a rag and the car will usually start on 2 cylinders and pick up the third and fourth after about 5 minutes. Driving in gully washers has never given me a problem, the engine heat seems to manage to keep the plugs dry enough.

As Mr. Ricks suggests, I'd start with checking how dry your coil box remains. A little bit of water dribbling down behind the firewall will wreak havoc. When putting my '17 together, I ran a bead of RTV in an inverted V above the porcelains on the box. I then bolted the box to the firewall. Any water that happens to come down behind the firewall gets diverted to the outer edges of the coil box. You should also check your plug wires to make sure the connections are clean and tight. You may also want to consider the coil box kit offered by Fun Projects.

The other culprit may be a wet timer and/or timer wiring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Wayne Rudzik on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 01:07 pm:

For the most part I have not had trouble with the plugs getting wet and shorting out. However, this last summer on a trip to to Fort Scott, Kansas in the rain, our '26 roadster, Sam, did have a problem with ignition.
It would run well and then hit and miss and hardly pull a hill.
At home, I found that two of the Champion 25 plugs I was using were cracked just under the spark plug connection next to the porceline. The water would get in, short the plug and the dry out and run great over and over.
Two other champion 25's I had did the same thing and it took about four plugs to find two good ones. I have had the electrodes break and kill the plug.
Check this point, it could be your problem, water getting into the electrode and shorting the plug.
I now have a good set of Champion 25's in the car and Sam runs great, even in today's heavy rain going to vote.
Hope this helps ya.

Joe R.
In Independence, Missouri


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 01:28 pm:

Jesse; I keep my truck in the garage with the door closed and the heater on.

Sincerely

Jim Weir


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Swan on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 02:20 pm:

Jessie, two things: 1) make sure the fire wall does not let water weep behind it and into the coil box, the firewall can be sealed with some sort of sealer. It will only take a small bead along the top of the hood at the fire wall to accomplish this; 2) then, take a thin peice of vinyl about 5" wide and as long as the hood less about 1/2" and with that same sealer, glue it to the bottom side of the hood just beneath the center hinge of the hood. Leave a small crimp or bulge in the vinyl the entire length of the material so that when you raise the hood it will not conflict with the raising the hood. That trick will also create a small trough to carry the water either forward of aft of the engine when the hood is down. If you paint the vinyl the same color as the hood, you won't be able to notice it or hardly see it unless you really try hard to spot it. I have used this technique for years and have been in many rain storms as well as having to leave the car in a motel parking lot overnight during heavy rains and have not had the fist problem in thousands and thousands of miles of T travel. Good Luck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Swan on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 02:22 pm:

Sorry Jesse, I misspelled your name. Ken Swan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthony on Monday, February 11, 2008 - 11:32 pm:

Jim why do you do such a ridiculous thing?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir on Tuesday, February 12, 2008 - 11:14 pm:

Anthony; Don't have side curtains, don't like rain on me and I'm a sissy.

Sincerely

Jim Weir


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