Wire wheel hub question

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Wire wheel hub question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend, Gresham, Orygun on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 03:25 am:

I recently picked up some '26-'27 wire wheels and hubs. There are two different kind of hubs pictures. Now I usually don't fool with these modern parts, so I'm not too familiar with them. Can anybudy tell me the differences in these hubs?

Thanks
-Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By james dimit on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 04:03 am:

Kieth, the ones on the left in each picture look like the normal wire wheel hubs I have seen. The others seem to have threads for a screw on hubcap, like the wood spoke wheel hubs. I would guess the front one at least was converted from a wood wheel hub. Is there any sign of welding on it? It may have had the bolt hole welded shut and new holes drilled for studs.
I'm no expert though, could maybe have been an after market deal? Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Spainhower on Thursday, February 07, 2008 - 02:31 pm:

Keith - My '26 is still apart. The two on the left in your photos match mine. I was told by an early owner of the car that they were original to the car. - Bruce

'26 Hubs


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Thursday, February 07, 2008 - 03:37 pm:

The ones on the right side of each photo are most likely made over from wood wheel hubs. They really shouldn't be used. The correct hubs have a nose meant to fit closely into the small end of the wire wheel hub and add support. This helps to prevent breakage/cracking around the five lug holes which otherwise would be the only area supporting the wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Thursday, February 07, 2008 - 08:50 pm:

Jerry,I doubt there is much difference in the rear ones. Iron is iron.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Friday, February 08, 2008 - 11:15 am:

I don't follow you exactly Jack. Iron is iron???The cracking I'm refering to would be around the wheel lug holes, not the hub flange. As long as the front or rear hub noses can engage with the small I.D. of the wheel hub, for support, I suppose they would work.

Maybe I should define what I mean; "wheel hub" as the center part of the wire wheel itself. While "hub" is the part that goes on the axle/spindle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen on Friday, February 08, 2008 - 12:41 pm:

Yep, the wheel should be supported by the hub. The lug nuts only secure the wheel. They aren't supposed the carry the weight. The snout of the wire wheel hubs engage the center portion of the wheel and carry the weight of the car. The rear hub on the right looks like it MAY do this but I'd definitely have reservations about the front hub pictured on the right.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Friday, February 08, 2008 - 09:14 pm:

The current wood wheel to wire wheel adapters that the vendors sell (see Langís page 21 of there 2006 catalog part # 2888A for the Model A wire wheel or 2888T for the smaller bolt pattern T wheels) to mount Model A Ford or Model T Ford wire wheel on a Model T wood wheel hub do NOT provide the additional support that the original 1926-26 hubs apparently did provide. I donít think it is an issue for those adapters. For the 1928-29 wire wheels I donít know for sure if they touched the drum further out like the 1926-27 T wires or not (it has been a little too long since I had those on a car). But I know for sure the 1930 and later Ford wire wheels did not. Based on that Ė I donít think the hub has to touch the outer part of the wheel hub. I do agree that it may put more stress on the flange and lug bolts. Therefore Ė you need to ensure they are at least as strong as the conversion sets that are being sold by the vendors. And if you are planning to run them on a light speedster Ė you have more of a margin of safety than if you were going to place them on a Fordor sedan etc.

If there is a mechanical/structural engineer in the house Ė at one time many years ago, I took a class where we could have figured out how much additional torsion would be placed on the wheel studs if it didnít have the outer support. But that was a while ago and I no longer know which box the slide ruler is located. I wonder if there is a website that offers a simple program for items like that? Warren -- while I don't remember all the math -- I am fairly certain that in the case where the wheel is held solid by the bolts as well as by a pressed fit at the outer part of the hub, that the weight / forces would be distributed to both areas. I.e. the lugs and the contact area on the outer part of the wheel (as well as to the brake drum on the Model A Fords - I dont know if the rear brake drum on the T provids a real solid area or if it is just there for the brake shoes and not the wheel.) We need a student who needs a research project to diagram the force vectors on a stationary wheel (it gets harder if the wheel is rolling).

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker 1915 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and 1907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, February 08, 2008 - 09:30 pm:

The Model A hub had a brake drum on both front and back. There was a ridge around the bolts that fit to the hub, as well as the outside of the wheel hub which fit to the drum. It was a much more secure wheel hub than that of the T. I don't know whether the adaptors apply that principle or not. Even Model A wheel hubs will crack, but the T's tend to be more prone to this problem.
Norm


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration