What interior fabric glue???????????

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: What interior fabric glue???????????
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 07:23 am:

Hey guys, what glue are you guys using for gluing the fabric to interior wall panals in closed cars. I found the "great" arosal glue I thought was going to work out great, but I am having some slight adheasion problems. It takes about 3 heavy layers to get it to bond the way it should. Good idea, that just didn't work out quite the way I had hoped. So...what are you guys using???????

Thanks, Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 08:12 am:

Tim,

Though I've never done an interior on a model T, I have used 3M's Super 77 spray adhesive on many things. Lack of adhesion is never a problem. Like all 3M products, it is expensive but IMO, well worth the price.

Seth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 09:34 am:

Seth,
I almost bought super 77, but here is my fear. I am using a foam-core board for my wall panals. It is 3/8" thick, sandwitched with plastic. It should give, at least a little insulation from hot sun in summer, and cold in winter. I will probably be fine due to the plastic film, but feared Super-77 might eat into the styrofoam. Any thoughts on that?

Thanks, Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 10:07 am:

Tim,

If it eats, it won't eat much because it isn't liquid for even a minute. My suggestion would be to try some test pieces and to spray both the fabric and the foam, minimizing the amount on each. Wait 30 seconds and then join the pieces EXACTLY WHERE YOU WANT IT TO GO! (the stuff ain't playin!)

Wear gloves unless you enjoy cleaning your hands with lacquer thinner.

Seth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 11:17 am:

Hi Tim,

Good morning Tim. It is not wise to glue the fabric directly to the face of cardboard wall panels, as the glue can easily saturate through the expensive upholstery and ruin the face side. When I upholstered my Model T Coupe back in 1972, I attached the fabric to the backing panel by cutting the fabric long enough so that it could be folded around the backside of the panel with 1" on all sides of the backside of the panel. Using Weldwood contact cement, glue only this 1" portion on the backside, leaving the fabric unglued on the front of the panel. If you get it good and tight, which can easily be accomplished with contact adhesive, the fabric will conform tightly to the panel even if it is bent into a curve. Experiment first with a scrap piece of linen onto a scrap peice of flexible cardboard using this method, before trying it with your expensive upholstery fabric. I believe you will be very pleased with the results once you master the technique. Good Luck. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 11:30 am:

Sorry Tim. I should have read more carfully. Contact cement will definitely eat the styrofoam down to nothing, so do NOT use it directly on the foam board. If you are intent on using the 3/8" foamboard, I recomment attaching a piece of cardboard to the back of the foam with double sided tape and glue the fabric to the backside edge of the cardboard using the method I described above. Getting the fabric tight will lock the foamboard in place against the cardboard backing panel, so you only need to use enough double sided tape to hold it on until the upholstery fabric is secured to the panel. The Weldwood paint-on type contact cement, that comes in a quart cans (like a paint can), is much better and stronger than the spray-on adhesive. Make sure it is the flammable (solvent) type. You need for it to be strong so that when you pull it tight, the opposite side will not let go as you pull it. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 12:35 pm:

Thanks guys,
Here is what I am working on. You can see on the far side the fabric came a little loose at the window edge.

Tim

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