Question on welding rotlieb sheetmetal panels

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Question on welding rotlieb sheetmetal panels
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By johna on Wednesday, February 06, 2008 - 11:50 pm:

I bought side panels for my 24 touring. they came in pieces (for shipping?) there is a seam on the latch side of the pas. side front door, and on the latch side of the rear door. do i but these tight or allow a 16th for the cut, or do they give extra to trim? I assume that i weld these togeather before i fit them to the wood.Any thougts?
john


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Thursday, February 07, 2008 - 01:28 am:

That's the problem with after market panels. You'll have to fit and possibly trim them. Butt welds are the best for aesthetics; However, there's no "rule" that says you can't lap a joint. The choice is dictated by your welding and finishing capabilities. Along the bottom, isn't there a lap joint anyway?

I wouldn't weld the panels together until you've aligned them to the body wood. This is how many folks end up with door problems or poor fitting wood. You need to make sure your body wood rails are dead-flat level and square to the frame mounts. The bodies were built from the frame rails up so you should start there by making sure they're straight, level and square.

If the body is still on the frame, the frame must be straight, square and level on top. A sagging frame will make a sagging body and tends to pinch the door openings. Especially when the old metal is cut out or removed. Before removing any panels, you should cross brace the leveled body side-to-side and front-to-back to retain it's shape. If you don't have a body/frame jig or a good frame to support and level the body, you could run into "fit" problems later.

And remember, measure twice and cut once. And make small cuts to remove metal. It's a lot easier taking more off than adding it back on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Thursday, February 07, 2008 - 10:50 am:

Get yourself one of these flanging tools so your lap joint will end up straight, smooth and will be a lot easier to weld the two pieces together than trying to do a butt weld. Bob
FLANGE TOOL


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Thompson on Thursday, February 07, 2008 - 01:39 pm:

Bob,
What does that flanging tool do?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank R. on Thursday, February 07, 2008 - 03:17 pm:

In traditional Chinglish, here are the directions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas J. Miller on Thursday, February 07, 2008 - 09:20 pm:

Although it's shown in Frank R's illustration, the other side is that what punches the holes so you can MIG the panels together.

Another indispensible sheet metal pneumatic tool is the nibbler. My first one was "stolen" by my admiring son and it's sitting in a college lab somewhere. I got mine from Harbor Freight (HF).

Disclaimer, I do not own HF, I don't know anyone who owns HF stock, I don't know anyone who works for HF since they fired the neighbor kid. I will in no way benefit from mentioning HF in this posting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Thursday, February 07, 2008 - 09:59 pm:

Klicko fasteners really help hold things together in the metal work. just fill up the holes later .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Bishop on Thursday, February 07, 2008 - 10:32 pm:

What are Klicko Fasteners ??? and where do you get them ??? Thanks, Harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Thursday, February 07, 2008 - 10:46 pm:

Harbor freight has them. They are a metal fastener used in aircraft and auto body world to hold panals toghether while working on them. typically a 1/8 hole is driled and a klecko inserted with special pliers and then another ,etc. Great little items.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska on Thursday, February 07, 2008 - 11:25 pm:

Harold,

For Clecos fasteners try this link to Eastwood. And then search for item 19074A. http://www.eastwoodco.com/

Hope this helps.

Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Friday, February 08, 2008 - 12:39 am:

Eastwood is always so over-priced on their stuff, I wonder how they stay in business. The pliers are around $5 and the 1/8 & 3/16 fasteners are $0.34 each here:

http://www.ustool.com Type "cleco" in the search box.

I don't like putting extra holes in my panels so I don't use the Clecos but I've ordered other tools from US Tools. Good service and fast shipping. Other than that, I have no connection.


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