Gas Headlight question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Gas Headlight question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ernest R. Spittler on Tuesday, February 12, 2008 - 05:55 pm:

I am purchasing a MC acetylene tank and regulator to operate my gas headlights on my 1914 touring. The tank measures 4 inches by 12 inches. Everything I read states the tank must be used in the verticle position. Can anyone give me an idea of where I could mount this tank other, than on the running board?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Tuesday, February 12, 2008 - 06:30 pm:

The running board is about it unless you want to take up space on the rear seat floorboard. You can fabricate a faux-generater to "hide" the tank when mounted on the running board. Or any sheet metal shop should be able to make one.

Yes, keep the tank valve-up at all times. If the tank is ever laid on it's side, let stand upright for about 1/2 hour or so before use. This allows the liquid acetone to resoak the filler. If you purge the liquid, the acetylene becomes HIGHLY unstable!!!

PS. Don't run copper lines.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Harmacinski on Tuesday, February 12, 2008 - 09:15 pm:

It is safer to run in the vertical position. BUT, my Aircraft Mechanic friend and another noted high mile Model T fellow have run the MC tank horizontally for years with no problems. They mount the tank on the frame under the front seat, or under the rear seat. It might be a good idea to use a spacer to incline it at 10-20 degrees, but they have had zero problems in the past 25 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Tuesday, February 12, 2008 - 10:03 pm:

They are quite fortunate. Maybe LUCKY would be a better term. The smaller tanks do have much less acetone. I suppose as long as the level doesn't approch the valve, it'll work. I'd be afraid of burning the acetone out of the tank and not knowing it though. Without the acetone, acetylene starts decomposing and could explode at pressures over 15psi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Tuesday, February 12, 2008 - 10:08 pm:

Just as thought, has anyone tried to convert to propane? It's cheaper and safer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Wednesday, February 13, 2008 - 12:38 am:

Propane is NOT safer, as it is heavier than air and puddles--until it finds an ignition source and then BOOM! Don't ever carry a propane tank inside your T!
T'
David D.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brad Wallace on Wednesday, February 13, 2008 - 01:45 pm:

Just a note about the MC tanks. The MC stands for Motor Cycle. Back when motorcycles had gas lights, these tanks mounted horizontally on the handlebars.

Here's a link showing one:
http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/1913-reading-standard-1.jpg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Wednesday, February 13, 2008 - 09:35 pm:

Puddles? Puddles where?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred McDonald on Wednesday, February 13, 2008 - 11:53 pm:

If you will click on my name, you will see our 1914 Touring car. As far as I know this tank came with this car and it lays sideways on the running board. Although it was not working when I got the car, I ran new lines and carefully tested it. It works very well thanks to the guys here who gave me some pointers. It does haave a guage on one end that showed full and still does. I've never had any problems with it.
Appreciate any comments anyone may have.
Fred McDonald


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Thursday, February 14, 2008 - 12:04 am:

Fred,
I use the same setup with my 1913 Buick,and am converting my 13 T. BTW, could you give me the dimensions for your wood trim pieces on your door? I would like to make some for our 13 T.

Thanks, Rob Heyen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Thursday, February 14, 2008 - 12:08 am:

The problem is that no one will fill a tank with a guage on the bottom. The original prestolite tanks have the valve offset, not located in the center as in modern tanks, and the tank is supposed to be mounted on its side with the valve at the top. I have one old brass plated tank that we took the guage out of and replaced it with a plug. I was able to get that tank filled that way twice before they refused to refill it. Most places just exchange tanks these days and they don't want to be bothered with sending a brass plated tank out for refilling.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred McDonald on Thursday, February 14, 2008 - 12:09 am:

Rob: Will be glad to. However I won't be out to the barn until this weekend. If I remember correctly the front pieces are curved and the right and the left are different. I may have to take some pictures for you. Please email me at mcdonaldfred@bellsouth.net so I can reply to you.
Fred McDonald


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