I need someone to shellac my float for me.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: I need someone to shellac my float for me.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Abbott on Thursday, February 14, 2008 - 07:34 pm:

I cant find anything to seal up my new kingston float that wont desolve in gass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Thursday, February 14, 2008 - 08:42 pm:

try 2 part epoxy very very thin
steve


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Thursday, February 14, 2008 - 08:53 pm:

Try the gas tank liner liquid.It worked for a friend of mine on a old stationary engine he had.
Of course,he was the same fellow that got tired of trying to find a float for a engine,so he glued a little vacuam tube from a radio to what was left of the old float in the carb.That engine ran till he died anyhow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darren J Wallace on Thursday, February 14, 2008 - 09:09 pm:

Kwik Poly is the best stuff I've ever used.
Or call Snyder's and get some of their closed cell material they sell for floats.No sealer needed.Problem solved.

Here's something that could start an interesting debate:
The late Harold Sharron of HCCA club fame through his wonderful book on brass era cars and their designs says NOT to shellac or seal any float.Leave it bare.It won't sink,it's cork.Let it find it's own level in the gasoline and set it accordingly.
I find this interesting.
Any opinions?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Thursday, February 14, 2008 - 09:18 pm:

I would think the main reason a fellow would consider sealing a float is not to "seal" it,but to retain it's shape and size.Cork decays and comes apart over time.

tell me more about this closed cell material please.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Thursday, February 14, 2008 - 09:22 pm:

eventually a float will get waterlogged (gas-logged)thus the suppliers suggest shellac.
steve


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Thursday, February 14, 2008 - 10:39 pm:

You can't use shellac if your area gas has any alcohol added. Alcohol is a thinner for shellac.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Jeffers on Friday, February 15, 2008 - 09:04 am:

You can also use airplane dope.
Pick up a bottle at a place where they sell models. Read what is says to thin it down, I forgot.
Thin it 50/50 so it will soak in then put one coat on.
Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Friday, February 15, 2008 - 09:52 am:

I tried airplane glue, the type that was sold when I was a kid. It comes in a yellow and red tube if I recall, the name was Ducor or something like that. It didn't stand up to gas at all.

Problem with any kind of covering is it makes the float heavy and you have to compensate by changing the float height. I like the composite Snyder sells. Some of the floats come ready made, eg Holley model G. For others you can buy a block of the stuff and shape your own. I made a float for a 5 ball from it Its good stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Friday, February 15, 2008 - 09:52 am:

If the float is gas-logged, would it be a good idea to weight it down in a container of lacquer thinner for several days until the gas and old gasoline varnish residue has bled out into the thinner? Once the float is clean of all residue it can then be left to dry for several days? That way you won't be locking in gasoline and varnish with whatever you decide to coat it with and the float will not sit low in the caburetor bowl. Just a thought. I have always had a brass float in my carburetor, so really have no experience with cork. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Abbott on Friday, February 15, 2008 - 10:21 am:

Thanks guys, I cant find the estes rocket paint anywere. I thought about finger nail polish, but like the one guy said, if theres alcohol in the gass that may be bad too. I like the composit material. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Friday, February 15, 2008 - 08:19 pm:

Dan,

I highly recommend the closed cell material for making the floats. If you still prefer to use the cork then you should NOT use model airplane glue-- but rather Model airplane butyrate dope (not the nitrate dope). For additional info on that -- please see
http://www.darehobby.com/accessories/dopethinners.htm
where it shares:

Butyrate Dope (bu'-ter-ate) is used only if the model is to have a fuel (called glow fuel, sometimes nitro fuel) powered motor unit. You need it only if flying your model airplane with an internal combustion engine. Butyrate is applied over Nitrate Clear Dope. It should only be thinned with Butyrate Thinner.

Wet fuel will soak the covering material and the balsa wood. You must protect all the surfaces from fuel penetration. You would brush-on several coats of the Butyrate Dope over the Nitrate you've previously applied. The Butyrate Dope will now make the entire airplane "fuelproof". The fuel residue that will eventually coat the surfaces of the plane when the engine is running (heavy droplets come out the exhaust of the engine), will not penetrate the covering and soak the covering and balsa wood, which would quickly ruin the model.

If anyone has had experience with the alcohol in the fuel attacking the Butyrate Dope, please let us know. Thank you for the help.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker 1915 Model T Ford Touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and 1907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


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