Tying a T to a trailer - how to?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Tying a T to a trailer - how to?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By smilebigtt on Friday, February 15, 2008 - 11:21 pm:

How, where and with what do you suggest to tie a T to a trailer?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lane walz on Friday, February 15, 2008 - 11:54 pm:

on my tt i am going to put eye bolt on the under side of the frame on the front and a plate with two eye bolts as a spacer above the rear cross member and use ratchet straps to pull it down to the trailer foor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven G. Williams on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 12:26 am:

I assume you have a car hauler trailer with four rrestraining rings in the deck, two in front, and two in rear. Spend the money to buy a profession set of ratchet tie downs. wrap the front two, one around each side of the frame up by the radiator, and cross them X pattern from the car to the tie downs. That prevents the car from moving side to side, and by attaching to the frame, you won't pull the axle out of the car.
Then go to the rear of the car, and attach your ratchet tie downs the same way, X from car to trailer, ratchet them snug, that prevents car from moving forward or to the rear, and from moving side to side.
Cost of car is worth expense of professional restraints.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 07:24 am:

Speedway has some very nice ones that I like using. http://www.speedwaymotors.com/p/475,219_Four-Point-Auto-Tie-Down-Kits.html?itemN o=tie%20down

The axle strap will keep from marring or bending the lips on the frame. Don't hang hooks on the frame.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 07:30 am:

Just a suggestion...stay away from Wal-Mart and other discount retailers' Chinese straps. The savings isn't worth losing your T off the trailer and possibly injuring/killing someone else.

Just my opinion. I had a cheapo Wal-Mart strap break once and if it hadn't hung up on another 4-wheeler on the trailer, I would have dropped a 2-month old ATV right out in the highway at 65 mph. It just ain't worth the risk.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike b. on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 08:08 am:

Over the last 40 years I've trailered vehicles from T-models to dump trucks and have tried to tie them down from vehicle axle to trailer, not frame to trailer. That way the suspension can "work". On some vehicles you can't, or shouldn't pull down the straps until the springs have bottomed out. If there is any "spring" left in the springs after being tied down, and you hit a significant bump, like encountered in the construction zones everywhere, the springs will flex and cause significant jerks to the tie-downs. I'm not an engineer and this logic may be totally wrong, but it has served me well over the years. Are there any other opinions?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 08:37 am:

Actually Mike, you are totally correct! I didn't want to blatantly disagree with Steven so I didn't mention it before (seems I do enough disagreeing on here as it is), but I've never used straps on a frame-to-trailer tie. I've used chains like that, but not straps. I strap my TT with axle straps attached to the axle at the spring perches on the front and near as possible to the perches on the rear. That puts the stress on the radius rods and not the center of the axles. Just make sure the ball and socket are in good shape so you don't put undue stress on that. I don't like pulling on the ball/socket and the pan area where it's riveted, so I don't pull the straps excessively tight. With the brake pulled, it don't move when the straps are snug. I brought it 700 miles from Kansas via Arkansas and the truck never moved to and fro or sideways.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 07:58 pm:

In my checkered career, I at one time moved oilwell drilling rigs and other very heavy stuff, so I tied things down in all manners of ways, using chains and boomers, never lost a load. When I went after my present car in Minnesota, I took chains and boomers, that was what I had. I tied the front axle to the front of the trailer, and the rear axle to the rear. All the way home, I would have to take a link or two out of the chains, the car was growing ! I have used for several years the heavy ratchet type straps over the wheels, front and back. I have built in tie downs in the floor (open trailer). This works very well for me, I don't think you could possibly lose the car, and the body is free to rock and roll, some may not like that, but there is no strain on anything by tying the wheels down that way. If you do this, get the basket kind of straps to fit over the wheels. Your mileage may vary, but it works for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven G. Williams on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 07:59 pm:

Hey Ray! Disagree with me anytime! I'm always willing to learn from someone else's experience. I had been warned about pulling the axle out of the car, and that's why I did the frame, esp. in front. And yes, the first thing I do is set the brakes. Do you cross the straps to prevent sideways movement when she bounces, or simply go direct to the anchor? First time I trailered a t was without professional straps, a cheaper type of ratchet straps, and when she bounced, she moved sideways. That's why I've been crossing them between the T and the anchor points, like an X. At least in front. If I remember correctly from last summer, in the rear there is no place to attach to the frame, so I've been running the strap around the axle at the perches, and going straight to the anchor. Crossing the straps at the rear would tend to pull the straps along the axle toward the center as she bounced, and work them loose.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Stanzione on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 08:09 pm:

The one added thing you might consider on a T, especially if going a long way, is to run a strap from the front axle to the back axle and snug it up pretty tight. This will keep you from putting a strain on the wishbone ball connection at the pan. This along with tying the axles down to the trailer will assure all the straps will stay tight the entire way. I also agree with strapping in an x pattern to keep the car from moving side to side as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By smilebigtt on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 09:01 pm:

thank you all. All every good advice. I have never trailered a T, so its nice to have a bunch of experenced people to learn from rather then learning first hand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By andy samuelson on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 09:07 pm:

If you don't want to tie onto the axle you can always tie onto the spring. The car will still be able to move some and not ride so hard as tieing down at the frame. I don't think you could ever pull the spring enough to pull a wishbone loose. Just wrap a rag around to save the paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 09:08 pm:

I've heard the theory about pulling the ball out of the socket and have to admit I think about that, but I tie mine down with the front axle pulled forward and the rear axle pulled to the rear. Like Ray, I just don't pull them so tight I think I'm going to damage anything. You're much more apt to put excess pressure on things in a panic stop than you are sudden accelleration, so with the T facing forward, the rear strap will be the one in tension during braking, so the force doesn't put any additional pressure on the radius ball than was already on it from pre-tensioning. I usually use only two tiedowns. One in front and one in the rear. The rear one goes from the left rear corner of the trailer, over the left axle, under the driveshaft, back over the right axle and back down to the right rear corner of the trailer. The front, I have done various things, but usually just wrap the axle twice in the center and tie off to the front two corners of the trailer. I suppose this arrangement could allow some sideways motion, but I've never experienced any.

That's what I do. Now here's what I think would be best. Tie each wheel down individually with four of those web type straps made for that purpose. That gets you away from any tension on the radius ball and gets you away from any sideways motion. However, this requires you to have dedicated anchor points. This would be fine if you always hauled the same vehicle. I haul various vehicles with my trailer and can't have dedicated anchor points for each, so I do the above.

Under no circumstances would I ever tie off to the frame. I would be too afraid that if I hit a bump, the T suspension would compress, get slack in the tie down and the hook come loose.

Hal


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 09:24 pm:

Actually Hal tieing to either the frame or the springs is going to make it impossible for the car to bounce because the springs are preloaded downwards. The car and trailer move as one, with the trailer suspension doing all the work. The car doesn't even jiggle in relation to the trailer, so the straps are never loose.

My tiedown straps have safety hooks that cannot come apart under any circumstances. You have to have the strap slack and then hold the spring loaded safety out of the way to remove it from either the trailer ring or the steel loop on the other end of the strap. I bought my current set at Carlisle from the guy who sewed them but have seen the same super heavy duty straps at other car events in California, Washington State and Texas. You can also find them on Ebay.

Be sure not to tie to the front axle because it can easily damage the fragile wishbone socket to pan area or pull the wishbone out of its socket if you don't have it adjusted properly.

The back axle is easily bent too. Again better to use the wheels to tie down using wheel straps or just strap to the rear spring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Frink on Sunday, February 17, 2008 - 01:46 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa in Poulsbo, WA on Sunday, February 17, 2008 - 04:03 am:

I am with Royce anf Bob. Wheel tie downs keep the car secure while still allowing the cars suspension to function normally.

Be_Zero_Be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By andy samuelson on Sunday, February 17, 2008 - 09:05 am:

Wheel tie downs require another whole set of floor rings. Also it limits you to only one length wheelbase car unless you us a track system. Also they wern't designed with wood spokes in mind.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Sunday, February 17, 2008 - 10:56 am:

"Wheel tie downs .. wern't designed with wood spokes in mind."

What do you mean by that? Is anchoring an empty car by its wheels somehow more abuse to them than driving 30 over a rough road with a load of pax?

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Monday, February 18, 2008 - 03:30 pm:

Good idea, Tom. Securing the front and rear axle together would prevent any possibility of damaging the wishbone or socket.

Steven, I don't cross my straps, but that is because they are fastend to the side of the trailer. Therefore the straps are doing the same thing as they would if they were crossed, just pulling away from one another. I do agree it is a good idea to not only hold the vehicle fore and aft, but have the straps configured so they are at an anle to prevent side-to-side movement as well.

I agree the best method would probably be the wheel webs. I just don't have any and, as Hal said, I use the trailer for many different vehicles. I don't like preloading the suspension since it is stiff enough already on the TT. My personal preference is to hold by the axles or wheels, let the trailer's and the vehicle's suspension do their own thing, and maybe between the two I won't shake my old truck completely apart :-)


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