Tool names

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Tool names
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Leming on Wednesday, February 20, 2008 - 07:13 pm:

In answering the safety wire question, it brought to mind my dads old tool names - maybe they are well known?? He called side cutters "Dykes" large adjustable pliers "water Pump Pliers" and that pair of pliers I mentioned that he used for safety wire and wire twisting in general - "Duck Bills" Ill try to think of more - but when I was a little one, I was his tool runner so to speak and I knew what all of them meant! He's 83, and was called upon by my son and I to give us an old aviation safety wire lesson last summer - boy was he in his hey day!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken - SAT on Wednesday, February 20, 2008 - 09:26 pm:

I'm bettin' your Dad is familiar with "Saw-Sets" and "Bit Braces" too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Sorenson on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 01:51 am:

One time I was under my T gettin' some gas for the lawn-mower and I asked "The Little Lady"(wife) to "hand me the pliers "I reached my hand out by the running board,,,,,,,,,,,,Here ya' go she sez,,,,,,,,,Phillips Head Screw-driver........Then she said "I don't know my wrenches ,,,,I guess".............Carl aka Spanky


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 08:25 am:

Dykes was short for diagonal cutters. Adjustable channel lock style pliers got the name water pump pliers because everyone used them to tighten packing nuts on same. I think the term applied to pumps on both cars and early pressure pumps for wells.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 01:03 pm:

I've heard all the terms in the first two posts and use them all except for "Waterpump Pliers". I just call them channel locks, no matter what brand they are. Same for visegrips. Mine are Crafstman, but I still call them visegrips.

What about those forged steel overcenter toggling locking devices made for tying a load down with chains to a truck or trailer? I've heard the term "Load Binders", but my Dad and Grand Dad called them "Bucking Dogs."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael K Johnson on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 02:12 pm:

What is the origin of monkey wrench? I remember all these names; thankfully it doesn't make me feel old since like others above I too was a tool gofer and now just go for my own and wouldn't be doing car stuff without having been someone's helper.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Mortensen on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 03:32 pm:

I believe Monkey Wrench comes from the name of the original inventor, Charles Moncky.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael K Johnson on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 04:16 pm:

Thanks for the tip Warren, found a later patent, an improved one which, surprisingly was done by the famous Afro-American boxer Jack Johnson. Couldn't paste the drawing but here is the site:

http://inventors.about.com/od/wstartinventions/ss/wrench.htm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthony J. Marino on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 04:59 pm:

I use a big 'Stillson' wrench for my exhaust pipe nut. My dad always called it that. It may have come from the inventor of the 'pipe' wrench? I'm always mindful not to break the exhaust manifold when I use the big wrench.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR. on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 10:14 pm:

Hal -- "Those forged steel overcenter toggling locking devices" are called "boomers" in this neck of the woods.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 10:29 pm:

Those locking devices are known around here as "binders" and Dot and alot of other employeers dont allow thier use due to to many teeth removed with out being put to sleep and to many jaws and chins busted from when they fly up!

What gets me is in the fire department the wrenchs used on hose fittings are called "spanner wrenchs".
I cant spell it but that is a redundancy,Spanner is what they call wrenchs accross the big mudpuddle.So when a fireman says he wants a spanner wrench,he is saying "I want the wrench wrench.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Alongi on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 11:19 pm:

When I was dispatching for the city, one of the service trucks had to take out a water wagon (emergency water during a main break) couldn't find the pin for the wagon, I heard someone over the radio say "just throw a 16" spanner in it" I assumed it was a Monkey wrench.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Billy McGuire on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 11:35 pm:

When I was a kid working on our family farm one of my uncles insisted that you always use the exact wrench for the purpose upon which it was intended. Another uncle was less interested in that and could have coined the term "git r' done." The second uncle had another farm by a different name and sometimes we would call out for "(the other farm's name) Tool Set" instead of simply asking for a crescent wrench. However, you always got the tool that you were looking for.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Alongi on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 12:05 am:

Whatever tool does the work, does the work, one of my favorites is one my father got in one of "your choice 99 cent bins" about 40 years ago, looks like a heavy screwdriver with several sized nested sockets on springs, once changed out a friends starter on a 64 Valiant in 15 minutes using it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth H. Todd on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 12:08 am:

There's another one, pracnarily everyone calls them "crescent wrench", but the majority are not Crescent, they're made by some other company.
In Newfoundland they call them thumb wrenches.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bud scudder on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 07:38 am:

Heres a couple, My grandpa and my dad called common pliers, a pair of pinchers. Any axe, big or small, was called a hatchet. Crow bar,was pry bar,pinch bar or jimmy bar. Any car was the machine. Any adjustable wrench was a fits all. Not auto related, but the little commode with the bail type handle was, a thunder mug or a slop jar. I miss those good ol' days


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave_Sosnoski on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 05:18 pm:

My father had a collection of special tools for doing auto body work. The "church key" was a long bar, about 1/2" dia and 3 feet long. It was bent into a D handle at one end. The other end tapered to a blunt point with a curve to it. Useful for reaching down inside tight spots to push out a dent. The other was the "microscopic adjuster". That was a 15 lb sledge hammer and a block of wood. Very useful in making doors fit. The slap hammer was an old file with a Z bend near one end. Used for hammering without stretching the metal or for shrinking. Another useful tool was a length of chain and the telephone pole in front of the house. Chaining the body to the pole and making a few tugs usually pulled things roughly back to where they were suppose to be. You just had to make sure you didn't tug to hard!

I also collect antique tools - mostly 18th century imprinted planes. Back before 1900 a router is a block of wood with an L shaped blade sticking down through the center. It's used for cleaning out the bottom of grooves. I also have an original Witchet (sometimes referred to as a Widget). It's a type of plane for planing round stock. You stick the stock into a hole and as you spin the tool around the stock a plane iron shaves the stock round. It's also known as a rounding plane (as opposed to a round plane which actually cuts a hollow)

Dave S.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 05:32 pm:

Around here a "Church Key" is an old slang term for a can opener. Not the type you cut the lid off a can with, mind you, but the kind that punches a triangular hole near the rim from which you would drink its contents. I'm sure it's origin comes from the days before beer cans had pop tops. Alcohol being the root of all evil here in the Bible Belt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 05:55 pm:

Here as well. I'm sure you know what a "Sunday Baptist" is, also - same guy that knows what to do with a church key.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael K Johnson on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 02:41 pm:

In my dad's sheet metal and structural steel shop in the fifties, a "perswader" was usually any thing bigger than you were using currently, be it hammer, pipe, crow bar or mule.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 04:12 pm:

Hal, you're right. The church key was around for decades before the pop top can arrived. Beer cans in those days were steel, not aluminum. I don't remember for sure when pop tops came on the scene, but I think it was in the late sixties. The Bible Belt reference reminds me of Jerry Clower's comment that the way to get rid of Kudzu is to spray it with bourbon, and the Baptists will gnaw it off down to the ground.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Sorenson on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 04:30 pm:

When I started my first real job as a Heavy equip. operater we were puttin in sewer main lines....All the laborers were hispanic guys....after learnin' that liquid don't run up hill,"a nice way a puttin it"I had to "relearn" all the names hand tools they used...When they wanted a Hammer ,,,,,all you heard was "MARTILLO"(mar-T-yo)you just stated holdin' up tools till ya' got the right one !!!!! Carl


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 06:05 pm:

Martillo is indeed Spanish for hammer. A sledgehammer is a Marta. My friend's Mexican wife is Martha, and I call her Marta. In French it's Martel, as in our own Chuck Martel. Charles the Hammer is his ancestor, and was an ancestor of Charlemagne and those other French of some notoriety.

My sons would sometimes question why I asked them to get me waterpump pliers when I was working on an aircooled VW or Porsche...

Ever seen a grub screw?

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 06:53 pm:

Dad calls the short handled 5 LB sledge an engineer hammer, so do I! Of course any hammer bigger then the one you are using becomes an engineer hammer!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 07:27 pm:

Where on the engineer is it supposed to be used?


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