New Lathe

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: New Lathe
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Dailledozue on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 01:47 am:

I just got my hands on a new (used) lathe. It's an older unit but works well. Southbend 11 x 48 a model: 27-A. Looks like the bed cast date is:
12-1-20.

Does anyone have an operators book on this model I could copy or buy?

Chris 903-819-1452


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 01:53 am:

Chris,

Try this link.

http://www.southbendlathe.com/manuals.htm

Hope this helps,

Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 02:18 am:

Congratulations! If it has not been abused or worn out, you won't be sorry! I have a 1939 South Bend 9x36 and I wouldn't take a farm in Georgia for it. Cutting threads is a bit more involved (change gears), but I've used newer lathes at work and I can't do any more precise work than with this antique South Bend.

South Bend published a book every few years called "How to Run a Lathe". It is full of all kinds of priceless information, especially if you want to do threading or any specialized work.

If you're like me and want to be able to do everything the lathe is capable of, (and if they didn't come with your lathe), you're going to want a 3 and 4-jaw chucks, face plate with several sets of dawgs, steady rest, follow rest, full set of collets, tool post grinder, taper attachment, tailstock chuck, quick-change tool post, and a milling attachment. You'll find real quick that the lathe is only half the investment but well worth it to invest in the accesories that allow you to do almost anything you'll ever need to do on a T. If I can help in any way, lemme know! (you don't necessarily have to have all that stuff, but you'll want it!)
Ray


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Pappas on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 03:01 am:

Good advice. My son had a 9" Southbend and then got an 11" and just sold the 9" to a friend. Great machines, for sure.
John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Pappas on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 04:10 am:

Howdy, this is John's son in regard to your lathe. My southbend 11 is probably identical to yours and I can assure you it is a superior lathe as long as it has not been abused. It will be quite rigid for most work at smaller diameters and I have even used it to turn some disk wheels for live steam locomotive construction out of 4140 steel 8" in diameter. It is no gear head, but a solid lathe with power cross and longitudinal feed and probably you also have the single tumbler quick change gearbox (a very nice feature). One issue is the spindle thread which I believe is 1 5/8" x 8tpi which is not standard so do not misplace your tooling. You might find that one is not enough tho, lathes are like a disease. I also have a 22" Whitcomb Blaisdell, 18" Porter, and 26/32" Rahn Carpenter. Best of luck!

Stathi


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 05:18 am:

Yep. like he said; It's a disease!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James H. Daw on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 10:41 am:

Almost as bad as the Model T disease.
Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Dailledozue on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 10:59 am:

Paul, had looked at that site, apparently the info were just parts lists.

Ray just found and ordered the book you mentioned. Published in 1942, should help.

Re disease... your both right, I now have two as well. However the 6" Atlas (Sears Craftsman) is now up for sale.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 03:59 pm:

Chris, believe me, it is a really nice little book and I keep it in my machinist chest beside the lathe. I don't remember things like I used to, especially numbers, and the book is an easy way to keep up with needed info in one place.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Dailledozue on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 04:20 pm:

Yeah I am lucky I remember where the garage is sometimes... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 01:33 am:

Chris I have a SB that's even older, a 1919 with a 21" swing and a 10 foot bed. My Dad got it for me from the place he worked back when I was going to college in 1963. It was originally purchased unused by the shop from goverment surplus but because it was so big for most of the smaller machining jobs it lead a pampered work schedule. Finally Dad's boss said they needed room and called the scrap guy that offered him $25. as scrap for it. Dad asked if he could buy it for me since I was taking up machine shop in college and so the boss just gave it to him. Got home for Christmas break and my Dad had it all set up in our garage as my Christmas present.

These were well built lathes maybe not the best out there but for the money that most shops could afford for a lathe it was money well spent. Mine has a 4 speed gear box for the lead screw but no extra gears came with it that are needed to get any more feeds. It has a line shaft conversion so a 3 hp motor can drive it to a 4 step pulley set up for different speeds and a back gear giving it 8 turning speeds total. It does have it's limits being so big but it's handy when I need it for special jobs. It has a 16" 4 jaw universal/independent chuck plus 4-3 jaw chucks in different sizes. Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 03:50 am:

Bob; My son inherited a SB 9x36 that was made in 1898 ?? it belonged to his great great uncle. It is a treadle power machine. It does not have a quick change feed screw, the gears must be changed. It is in pieces now, my dad was going to fix it.

It was not used for heavy cuts.

Sincerely

Jim Weir


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 09:08 am:

Bob - Always better to do a small job on a big lathe than to try to do a big job on a small lathe; safer too!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 01:06 pm:

I agree Harold, I have 3 other lathes that fill in for most of my daily work. An Enco 13X48 that I bought new that I use for most of the precision turning jobs. I also have a Rockford 14X60 that's a bit worn on the ways mainly just under the headstock from production jobs used before I purchased it. It's good for jobs like spindle grinding and other dirty jobs were grit removal is a concern with a lathe used for precise turning. I used to turn rough cast brass fire bells with it when I first got it which required wet sanding and polishing in the final stages that weren't good for the ways if done a more precision lathe.

The last lathe is a jeweler's lathe left to me by my father who collected antique clocks and also did clock repairs. It uses just collets for holding objects and requires that I use a magnifying lamp to see what I'm doing. It's like the SB and doesn't see much daily work but great to have when the odd job shows up. Bob


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