Help with - vintage decals

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Help with - vintage decals
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tyrone thomas on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 09:53 am:

In the middle 20's, was a vinyl material (sticker) ever used in any sort of sign advertising?
On gas pumps? On advertising signs? Or was all means of outdoors advertising screen print or painted? I want to put some vintage advertising on my racer and I have found some neat oil and gas decals at "vic's Place" but I don't want to use them unless the same material was used in the period.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 10:35 am:

I don't believe they had vinyl decals back in the 20's. The most advanced plastic-like materials there were back then was bakelite and cellulose with the majority of advances made during World War II, through necessity. Vinyl, stick-on and water transfer decals are a relatively modern developement. Any advertisements on racecars, if there was such a thing were painted on, like the numbers. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tyrone thomas on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 01:56 pm:

Thank you Jim. I was a friad of that. I have paintedon numbers and some advertising (text) and wanted some oil or gas ads but they get more art'sy then my talent.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel Keefer on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 03:01 pm:

I think that magnetic sign shops can place your pictures on a magnetic backing. This might work for you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Mullin on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 03:50 pm:

Tyrone,

Decalcomanias have been common since the mid 1800s, although developed in the 1700s. I think using them would be vintage appropriate, if the images on the decals are vintage correct. If you want to get rid of the decal film, the model railroad stores carry several brands of decal film desolver.

I have a wooden advertising sign with a decal for chewing tobacco that is pretty old, not sure when it was made. But is likly to go back to the 'teens. I've had it since the early 1950s, and it was not new then.

Tom


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 04:05 pm:

About 20 years ago, I purchased dozens of vintage ceramic advertising signs from Ande Rooney for the wall in my recreation room. You can visit them online at www.Anderooney.com and browse their catalog and view hundreds of vintage advertising signs from 21 various catagories (I would suggest Smoking, Soft Drink, Automobile and/or Beer). Pull up the 1920's vintage advertising signs that you think would look good on your car and print the signs out and have a talented sign painter handpaint them onto your car. I noticed that they have magnetic signs too. If they are the flexible vinyl signs, they might conform to the contours and flat areas of your car, which would save on the cost of expensive handpainting, but handpainting would be more authentic and impressive, if, as I mentioned earlier, race cars back then had sponsors. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tyrone thomas on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 04:17 pm:

I was just able to talk to Vic's" I asked the same question and they said that there was water released decals in the 20's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 04:54 pm:

That may be so, but I seriously doubt that a company would go to the expense of having a transfer type decal made specifically for sponsoring a race car. I do know that my all original 1926 Model T Fordor does have a 1933 water release decal on the passenger side windshield, from the Illinois Department of Motor Vehicles, advertising the World's Fair, which, that year, was in Chicago. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By andy samuelson on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 08:22 pm:

Most up to date sign shops today don't paint the lettering anymore. The lettering on vans and most trucks is peal and stick. They have a computer generated machine that rolls them out.
Ask a sign guy if he can scan your old add or sign and make a transfer. I was watching them do a big walk in van last week and even the shaded letters are done on the puter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthony Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 08:39 pm:

Here's a method of cheating

If you can scan an image of the logo you want on the car, then take that computer file to your local signwriting shop. A decent singnwriter or graphics type person will be able to break it up into stencils that they can cumpter cut in vinyl.

They can probably supply you some good quality high opacity paint too.

Apply the complete sticker, remove a portion and paint it in with a brush. Try and do it with long consistent brush strokes... not like just coulouring in with a pencil!

Remove the next portion and apply the next colour. If the colour is hard up against the first then practice with a stedy hand and stick to rest on. You'll get some authentic looking wobbles and so on until you're finished. Allow the paint to dry, but wait till it's quite hard before polishing off the fuzzy edges.

We did this with a Ford logo and signwriting on the bonnett of my truck... works very well and if anything it is too perfect.

Cheers1924


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By smilebigtt on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 10:42 pm:

looks Anthony. We do have a good sign shop here. Will take a picture down to then and get an answer. But I do want to paint them on. Thanks all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By smilebigtt on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 10:43 pm:

Sorry Anthony. It looks good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 01:33 am:

Tyrone. Which ad/ads did you decide on? Please post a picture of your results once it is done. Good luck. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 03:19 am:

My mid '20s vintage Martin Parry body has factory issue water transfer decals on the doors, and seat riser, with the M/P logo, and two above the windshield with the patent numbers, and a warning to keep all nuts drawn up tight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Sumner on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 09:18 am:

Here is the hand painted logo and number on my racer. My daughters high school art teacher at the time painted it for me. Les25 fronty special


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 09:43 am:

Here is an easy way to get "perfect" hand painted signs:

Go to the website that Jim Patrick mentioned. Find one you like (that isn't copy writed of course) lol.....and save it to your computor. Then Buy some clear transfer paper from staples or office max and print the picture. Go to your local library, or talk to a friendly teacher you know and borrow an overhead projector. Project the immage on the side of your car where you want it. The rest is like paint by number!

Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 11:02 am:

Good idea Tim, but clear transfer plastic is not necessary if you have access to an "opaque overhead projector". With one of these, you will be able to view items printed on regular paper or pages from books. Opaque projectors light the object from above instead of from below and project the reflected image onto the wall in true color. We have one at work and I was able to paint an 8' x 8' roadside sign of our company logo projected from a 3" x 3" polaroid sized picture. I am attaching a picture of our projector using the brochure from our files. Most colleges and libraries have them and you might be able to go to the media department and borrow it, or perhaps an office supply rental company might have one you can rent. Jim Opaque Projector


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tyrone thomas on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 03:29 pm:

Jim, I'm leaning toward one of several. Cocaine for Dandruff Control, Pond's Extract cures Diptheria Piles, CEA Croup Cure, Winslow's Teething Syrup Containing Opium, or Crude Oil Hair Tonic. How you can buy all this stuff at the local drug store.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 03:31 pm:

Great! I'm looking forward to seeing the finished product if you decide to post pictures. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tyrone thomas on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 03:34 pm:

That gives me a good idea. I can get some slide film for my camera, take a photo of what I want, develop it, and use my slide projector to show the picture onto the car. Man you guys are the smartest.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tyrone thomas on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 03:37 pm:

Jim which one would you pick? I kind of like the hair tonic. So when I change the oil in the car I can rub it into my head and have hair again after 25 years without. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 04:07 pm:

LOL! Sounds good to me. Preferably anything that is colorful, clever and/or illegal by today's standards (but not back then) would be my choice and since you have plenty of room on both sides of the car, nothing says you can't have several sponsors.

Some of the colorful soft drink ads such as Pepsi Cola with the old fashioned curly-Q lettering would look great and of course an oil brand such as "Oilzum" or a garage would be the type of sponsors I would imagine would want to sponsor a racecar. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tyrone thomas on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 04:43 pm:

yeah I like that oilzum sign. I agree with your yesterdays standards thought. Just need to make up my mine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel Leipold on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 07:14 pm:

Old painted signs were often silk screened, a process still in use. Water transfers date long ago. Meyercord of Chicago was a prime supplier. Local artists painted many signs. Less Kuba, the wild life artist (now deseased} started around 1930 hand painting Coca-Cola signs on side of barns and stores. Hand painting of signs went out of general use in the late 1970s and early 80s. A hand painted sign still looks the best. Vinyl looks nice, but it still is vinyl. Nothing beats a nice hand lettered sign. Old porcelain signs are a different matter. My big flying horse Mobil sign is porcelain on steel (as is my 1920s Ford sign)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sanders on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 07:38 pm:

A vinyl stencil would work well. I cut them for a faux decorating store...it's amazing what they can do with them. All you need is a design (in black and white, no mid tones) take it to a sign shop where they can scan,size and cut your design. Place it on the area to be painted and go. You might want to practice with a spare on another piece of metal first. Be sure to use a low tack vinyl like Avery Paint Mask or you might peel some of your T's paint up when the project is dry. Here is a sample...




Bob


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