Stoplight switch

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Stoplight switch
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jim kirkpatrick on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 10:09 pm:

Has anyone used the original style switch that Langs sells.The catalog states Marginal Reliability. I was wondering what the problems are with it. I want to put brake lights on my 26 tudor sedan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Morse on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 10:54 pm:

Jim, last I knew Lang's sells two types of brake switches. I spoke with (can't remember his name...) one of their techie guys about 8 or 10 months ago and he said one was marginal and the other one was really good. You may want to give them a call.

Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 08:15 am:

Jim,

This one is excellent. No marginal reliability here. Sorry, but I don't know who sells them - my car came with this one.

See also "Brake light switch and other questions" last visited January 11, 2008.

Seth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 08:34 am:

The type Seth has shown work well. I went the route that Phil Mino (sp?) posted using a model A (28-29) switch and that also works well.

I hate the one that goes on the Bendix cover. The one on my car shorted internally and about burnt the car up (I now have a master fuse). I spoke with a member of our chapter and he had the exact same thing happen using the Bendix cover switch. It seems like one other forum poster had the same experience.

The type shown above could be made in a few minutes using a momentary push on switch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 09:43 am:

Jim, the original style switch has two problems.

1. The contacts that conduct current to light the stop light only make contact for a very short range of the switch travel. That results in one quick flash of the stop light as the foot brake is applied. This problem can be repaired by removing one rivet and turning the switch body to expose the contacts and then bending the contacts differently to allow contact for a longer range of actuator travel. Then the switch bady can be swiveled back and a small pop rivet used to replace the missing rivet.

2. The terminal nuts loosen and allow the terminal bolts to drop down and short on the case. This could cause a fire, if the stop light wire is not fused. A 10 amp fuse is normally adequate for that line.

The switch shown above does not have either of these problems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Cummings on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 11:22 am:

Here is a link to Phil Mino's 1928-29 Model A switch mounting.
http://www.geocities.com/fordfarm1/StopSwitch.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 01:25 pm:

I used a brake lt switch from a 78 honda civic, it is a normaly closed switch and is very small. mounted by bending a small bracket that fastens to one bolt on trans. cover, has adjustment space and takes very movement little to actuate KB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jim kirkpatrick on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 05:25 pm:

Thanks for all the advice I think I'll go with something like Seth has


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Guy D Nelli on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 06:14 pm:

seth, snyders sells them. guy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 06:32 pm:

Thanks Guy.

Jim,

Notice that there are a couple of washers under each of those attachment bolts so that the arm doesn't bend contacting the inspection cover. Using them put my switch near the center of the brake shaft. You may or may not need any.

Seth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky on Friday, February 29, 2008 - 12:09 am:


quote:

1. The contacts that conduct current to light the stop light only make contact for a very short range of the switch travel. That results in one quick flash of the stop light as the foot brake is applied.

2. The terminal nuts loosen and allow the terminal bolts to drop down and short on the case.




Could it be the new switches are no longer plagued by these problems? I bought one of these a couple of months ago and don't see either problem.
1. The switch makes full contact throughout it's movement.
2. The terminals are double nutted with lock washers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Friday, February 29, 2008 - 08:07 am:

Ken, my switch was about 10 years old and I put the same note on the Forum a few years back. Those were both common problems with the earlier switches. The problem was not isolated to my switch. The new switches may function properly now. Last week though, I was explaining the problem to a friend and how to do the fix. His switch had the same problem, but then, I'm not sure how old his switch was either. The repair is simple and anyone using that original style switch should frequently check the operation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Hansen on Friday, February 29, 2008 - 02:48 pm:

I bought the orginal switch from Langs less than a year ago and did not experience any of the problems Ken mentioned


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky on Friday, February 29, 2008 - 03:10 pm:

LOL... I didn't mention it. That was quoted from a previous post. Yeah, I think the current switches are getting a bad rap. It could be that the Mfg. paid attention to what was being said about the problems and changed them. Like many of the problem parts, when word gets around and sales drop, somebody usually listens.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Hansen on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 09:51 am:

Apologies Ken. I guess I read your response a bit too fast.

Yes I do think the problems with the bendix cover switch are resolved. I have one on each of my tourings without any issues.

Of course all Ts should have an in-line fuse whether they have a stop light switch or not


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 10:22 am:

Tim,

Yes, having a fuse is a grand idea until it blows and your car has a generator that becomes unloaded. If that happens, your generator will likely fry.

Seth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth H. Todd on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 11:16 am:

The way I figger it, if everything except the generator is fused, that will protect the generator.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 11:31 am:

Agreed Ken. I was just checking to make sure you were awake.

Seth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gene magmuson on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 11:45 am:

use the model a switch, and a fuse. no brainer to install.i used a small chain from the brake pedal to the switch it has a spring built into the switch. it works great on the model A and the T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 11:55 am:

Kenneth & Seth - I have not done it yet, but on my '23 roadster & '23 touring, I plan to fuse each circuit individually at the terminal block. Not only no worries about the generator, but in the event of a short circuit, individual fuses should make it much easier to quickly locate the problem. I don't get along with electricity very well, but does this make sense?

harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 01:06 pm:

Harold,

Sounds like a bunch of work to me since the fuses aren't likely to blow anyway. A single 20 amp fuse should be sufficient.

Mine has no generator, so everything, including the ammeter wiring is protected by this one 1 1/4" long 20 amp fuse.



If you have a generator, wire everything the Ford way except for connecting the fuse on the "car", not "battery" side of the ammeter.

Seth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 01:44 pm:

Model A stop light switch is the way to go. Much simpler to install, doesn't get in the way when adjusting bands, easier to adjust.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 05:59 pm:

I would agree with Royce. I've installed 3 of them on different T's, and the only thing you have to do is manufacture a bracket to mount it to. Then wire it up and adjust it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky on Sunday, March 02, 2008 - 12:23 am:

"...and the only thing you have to do is manufacture a bracket to mount it to."

How is THAT "much simpler to install"? The original design didn't get in the way of a band install either and all you have to do is mount it. You don't have to fabricate anything. I'm corn-fused!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky on Sunday, March 02, 2008 - 12:31 am:

Forgot to mention: No need to worry about the generator if you fuse that too.
(Or have a VR.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck on Sunday, March 02, 2008 - 06:40 am:

I have a hard time figuring out how the one I have is "in the way" when adjusting the bands. The six screws (or bolts) have to come out of the tranny door - same as if it had no stop light switch. Then you simply move the bar to the side. Big whoopee - really "in the way"?

Seth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Sunday, March 02, 2008 - 10:18 am:

I have a 28 / 29 Model A switch like the one in Phil Mino's picture attached to the underside of the rear most non removable floorboard section with 4 wood screws. A piece of screen door spring about 12" long goes from the Model A brake light switch to the brake pedal.

It couldn't be any simpler. No bracket is necessary.

Royce


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson on Sunday, March 02, 2008 - 01:04 pm:

Royce

Thanks for the explanation.

Kirk
Santa Fe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jim kirkpatrick on Sunday, March 02, 2008 - 09:29 pm:

Hey guys heres an update a friend of mine had the starter mounted switch he bought but had not used yet so he told me to try it if it worked ok I would order him another one I have it on and wired up with a fuse in line. movement of the switch seems good and it works real well so I'll use it and see how it goes.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration