We need a law to get a certificate of title

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: We need a law to get a certificate of title
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Holland on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 03:42 pm:

We need a law to get a certificate of title for an automobile built before state title laws were written. Even with matching numbers, a drivable car, and a lawful Bill-of-Sale some states will not issue a title. There are certain provisions for a probate judge to initiate action with the DMV but all is very expensive. And you have to die to qualify!

Perhaps AACA - MTFCA and other powers should work on this. We really want to be legal.

Ohio T owner


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 03:56 pm:

www.semasan.com or www.sema.com cant get a decent link to come up to copy.I got this from the last newsletter they emailed me.
Join up and get a newsletter that explains laws being put thru each state and so forth.They also link to politcal related folks that support the car hobby.
This is where the rodders and restorers need to work together to get decent,hobby freindly laws passed to make things at least reasonable to follow the laws.Strength is in numbers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Sunday, March 02, 2008 - 09:52 am:

Most states have laws relating to a mechanic's lien or an abandoned vehicle that may help with a title. You may want to read that section of your state's motor vehicle laws.

Maryland has a legal procedure that allows you to claim and obtain a title to any vehicle abandoned on your property for over 30 days.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Sunday, March 02, 2008 - 10:19 am:

James,
The problem with all those methods it this:
All of those methods of obtaining a title in Ohio involve an existing title of some kind.

They check the "vin" and trace it back to the last owner then transfer that title to you.

The B M v told me this.

1. Go back to the seller that gave you the bill of sale and get the title. (of course he didn't have it, he bought the car in Wyoming)

2. Get a builders title by presenting a reciept for all the parts. Then get it inspected by the state patrol. (This means it would be titled as a 2008 because it was built in 2008. It would then have to meet all 2008 standards such as emissions, seat belts, etc. etc.)

Maybe I will just get a Chevy engine with emission control and build a Rat rod.....it sure would be easier!

Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Sunday, March 02, 2008 - 11:12 am:

Our Kansas legislature is sometimes an embarrassment, but it seems they did OK on this. When I bought my TT in Arkansas with no title, all I needed to get a title here was the handwritten bill of sale, the serial number, a photo of the vehicle, and paying the sales tax. When I read about the Kafkaesque bureacratic nonsense inflicted in other states, I think we're pretty lucky here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky on Sunday, March 02, 2008 - 10:32 pm:

This subject comes up a lot and every time it produces the same results--Disappointment. I still, for the life of me, can't understand why someone would buy a car without a title. If the seller says it's easy, why doesn't he get a legal transferable title for the car? If you're building a car from parts, then it should be titled a builder's car. Either way, the laws are written to protect car owners as well as unsuspecting buyers in a fraudulent sale.

There's thousands of cars stolen every day in the US. There's some that make the news because they turn up 30 years later. I'm not saying cars without a title are stolen but anyone that buys a car without a title is taking a serious risk of loss. If the car turns up in a database somewhere as stolen, you'll lose the car no matter how much you've invested.

It's good that some of you live in a state where the laws are easy to comply with but some of us live is states that make it near impossible to get a title if the car didn't have a title from the beginning. Texas is so strict that even a pen mark in the wrong place on a title can render it void. The law states there can be NO corrections to a title. I got burned because the seller started to sign his name in the wrong place; stopped after the first letter and crossed through it. The DMV wouldn't accept the title unless the seller signed another form stating the events of the correction. Even when the clerk understood the correction and knew how it happened, she couldn't accept it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Sizemore on Sunday, March 02, 2008 - 11:32 pm:

I have sold several cars to folks in Ohio with out the title. Ga doesn't issue or reissue any titles older than 20 yrs. I wrote out a bill of sale, current registration and receive a DMV document stating what Ga requires on the GA DMV letter head for the buyer to take to the Ohio DMV. Ohio has issued titles for those vehicle with no problem. This has been the case in several other states as well. I did sell a car to Iowa that require a bond to be put on the car. but other than that I have had no problems with title or registratin a car.
For the GA DMV to issue a letter, the vehicle must be registered in Ga. So every car I sell that does not have a title is registered in my name before it is sold.


The first T I registered had a Tenn title, I registered it and turned over the title to DMV for issueing a Ga title they disposed of the title because it was not needed in Ga. If I buy a car with a title I just hang on to it until I resell it and give it to the new owner.

Tim where there is a will theres a way
JS


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie in Houston on Monday, March 03, 2008 - 11:57 am:

As Ken Kopsky pointed out on his posting, Texas can be difficult. The easiest route is to get the vehicle registered in a state with more lenient laws and transfer the title to Texas. A second option is a title hearing. One must first officially be denied a title by the DMV. After that a title hearing can be set up with the regional office of the DMV. One must produce a Bill of Sale, a history statement and anything and everything else that might help. If it is built out of pieces, you must account for engine, body and frame. A notorized statement from the seller accounting for the pieces is required. Usually more than two trips to the DVM will be required


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bill leahy on Monday, March 03, 2008 - 12:10 pm:

here are two of my previous posts that pertain specifically to ohio if you go to the ohio bmv web site faq section it will give you a customer service number to call for instructions. basically you will need a notarized bill of sale, a state inspection certificate, and a notarized letter from you stating the circumstances of your purchase, and you attestation as to the veracity of the information you are submitting. if the documents meet their requirements they will send you a letter of approval which you take to the title bureau. it worked once for me but not the second time thus far. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
By bill leahy on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 08:57 am:
andy, the statute cited by the columbus office of the bmv was 4505.10. as i said i had previously submitted a notarized bill of sale plus an out of state inspection certificate for a 1914 runabout. on that occasion i received a prompt reply to the local bmv instructing them to issue a title. since then there has been a change of administration i columbus. policies may have changed as well or the individuals reviewing my submissions may have enough discretion that it was simply rejected.




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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bill leahy on Monday, March 03, 2008 - 12:14 pm:

sorry i missed the most important post. By bill leahy on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 06:38 pm:
i mentioned that i would report back on my efforts to obtain an ohio title. after submitting an out of state inspection, a notarized bill of sale, and a letter stating the facts of the purchase, my application was initially denied. the next option was to submit the same information to the common pleas court for a court ordered title. this effort was successful. the court costs were $170.


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