Model T ID help please?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Model T ID help please?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Smith on Monday, March 03, 2008 - 04:51 pm:

Any idea of what model is shown in the picture?
I'm told it's a 1924 and am looking to pick something up for my Dad to play with. I couldn't find a match which makes me wonder if it's original.
1924 Model T?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tyrone thomas on Monday, March 03, 2008 - 05:19 pm:

I would not so much about the car as I would the guy with the hole where his face ought to be. I can't help much but it looks like somebodys idea of a speedster.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tyrone thomas on Monday, March 03, 2008 - 05:21 pm:

Take 2, I would not WORRY so much....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim ( www.ModelTengine.com ) on Monday, March 03, 2008 - 06:40 pm:

Looks like a roadster that met up with a sawzall. I like it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Monday, March 03, 2008 - 06:49 pm:

Nice car, but the monocle windshield is mounted too close to the driver's face.
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker on Monday, March 03, 2008 - 06:59 pm:

Ron,

What does your Dad want?

If he is looking to build a speedster, just about any Model T chassis will work.

If he wants to build mostly all of one year and/or body style -- what year/year range and what body style? I.e. 1915-16 or 1917-20 or 1921-22 or 1923 or 24 etc. And then what body style?

If he doesn't care -- then again anything will work – but selecting a car that is mostly all one year and body style will greatly simplify the restoration or fix up task.

And what condition is he looking for -- a daily driver, a project, a major project (just about any wood framed enclose car that needs the wood replaced can make a nice major project) etc.

Based on the answers to the above questions -- recommend you look at several cars and pick the one in the best condition you can afford. A worn car from a reputable owner (i.e. one who maintained and toured it regularly) can be less work than a shiny one that was not properly restored/fixed.

From that single picture the body appears to have been modified. It could be a late high cowl 1923 to 1925 open car. From that angle it is hard to tell if they used a touring front half or a roadster body to start with. If the door opening on the driver’s side was originally an opening door – it is NOT a USA produced body but probably Canada or one of the other countries that had both doors opening. If they just cut the fake driver’s door out – then USA production. The turtle deck – appears to be 1923 model to 1925 roadster.

Straight Rear Fenders are pre-1915. Wheels look like non-demountable wood square fellow – 1918 -25 or so.

And it could be anything from a 1909 to 1927 engine transmission, chassis etc. It also looks like the radiator shell is not there – which would cause part of the poor hood alignment.

If the budget permits, a good drive is often times a good place to start with a T. It is more fun and you can learn as you drive. You can let the kids play in it and if you hit the garage because you “goofed” you can touch up the paint easily. Based on a single photo – I would not recommend purchasing it without finding out additional details. I have seen bodies that were propped up with lose 2x4s – took an ok picture – not safe to drive, etc. So you need more information to make an informed decision. If it is free – take it and make the investigation later.

And finally – if it is for a relative – be sure you are reading things correctly. How does his significant other feel about it? Do they want a project to keep your Dad at home in the garage or a completed touring, sedan, depot hack etc. to take the grandkids for rides to the Dairy Queen? Sometimes – it is better to purchase a car for yourself and let “Dad” work on it and keep it at his place. Sometimes it is better to purchase the car you really want and have it at Dad’s so you don’t get in trouble -- I mean -- so it won’t be in your wife’s way.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker 1915 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and 1907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Smith on Monday, March 03, 2008 - 10:52 pm:

Thanks Tyrone and Hap!
Hap - to answer your questions..I don't think he really knows what he's after. He just asked me to keep an eye out for one for him to mess with in his spare time, and this is one I found. I would definitely go take a look at it in person before recommending it, although I know little to nothing about them. I figured if the body looked solid with no major rust spots and looked to be something he could restore, well.....
It comes with a TON of spare parts (3 engines in various states of dissassembly (who knows what condition), 4 rear ends, radiator shrouds, fenders, a great deal of suspension components from that era etc, etc. Hard to say really. Maybe I can talk him into coming down to look at it himself. A plane ticket may end up being a lot less expensive in the long run.
Thanks again!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, March 03, 2008 - 11:29 pm:

the car looks like 23-25. The rear fender looks older. Don't know what the engine or transmission is.

It's a Model T. most people who are not in the hobby would not know what year it is. You can get a complete list of engine numbers and find out what year the engine is. That will not, however tell you what year the car is, because the engines are interchangeable and could have been rekplaced as well as the body could have been changed on the chassis. If you ares wanting to make it look authentic, I would suggest you go with the 1924 which it is registered. You won't have to change the registration. Then most of the parts will be authentic and if you want to be more of a purist, just change the other parts to 1924.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glenn Pullin on Tuesday, March 04, 2008 - 02:32 am:

Ron
Ive had a look through Larry Sigworths CD's on speedsters - nothing really matches your body style.
Like many, speedsters were just put together by individuals and dont have a particular or standard style.
Judging by the previous posts, you have bits and pieces of different years. Thats fine, nothing to worry about unless you are looking for an award winning car. Like many of us T nuts, it doesnt matter - just so long as it goes and you can have fun with it.
You can easily identify the engine production year (even almost down to the actual date) by the engine number.
Good luck.
Glenn


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend, Gresham, Orygun on Tuesday, March 04, 2008 - 06:55 pm:

Ron-
It looks to me like sombody simply hacked off the top part of a '23-'25 runabout body. (Maybe Canadian, because of the driver's side door opening.) Probably put a gas tank in the turtledeck after lowering the seat frame.

The main thing to find out is what would your Dad like? Would he like a stock Model T or a "fun car that is made out of Model T parts."

Have him look through the galleries of both MTFCA and MTFCI sites and see what suits his fancy.

-Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Martin on Tuesday, March 04, 2008 - 09:06 pm:

You mentioned "if the body looks solid"... My experience has been the major costs and time is in getting the chassie in a safe working order. Steering, brakes, rear end, tranny, cooling system, fuel system, tires, just to name a few.....Any rough body is a lot of fun to drive around in on a good safe chassie. I would recomend picking up a couple of the vendors parts catalogs to get aquainted with the parts and the costs. Bondo and paint is the easy part (and least expensive!) of the project...
Good luck, and look around, there are some good deals out there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Smith on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 06:56 pm:

Thanks again everyone. I've forwarded pictures to him for his viewing pleasure.


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