Music From When Our Cars Were New

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Music From When Our Cars Were New
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Sumerall -AL on Wednesday, March 05, 2008 - 05:00 pm:

I think this has been mentioned before but I think it is worth repeating for those who love original recordings on 78s from the 20s and 30s. If you will check out www.slackaction.com you will hear an hour long radio show that is new every week. The show is updated each week. If our T's had had radios in them, this is the music that would have been played. Music from this era is quite different from big band music from the late 30s and 40s. I think this music from the 20s and early 30s is much better. Last September at the Old Car Festival at the Henry Ford (Greenfield Village) there was on Saturday evening a band that played this exact type of music and it was a highlight of the day for me and my wife. I hope you enjoy it! MIKE


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Wednesday, March 05, 2008 - 05:53 pm:


For those interested in the popular music of the Jazz Age, which included the last half of the Model T era, there are a couple of CD's you'll enjoy. Vince Giordano's Nighthawks have recorded a collection of hits from Harlem's Cotton Club, shown here, and "Quality Shout", a collection of hot jazz numbers painstakingly transcribed from 78's and played by some of New York City's best pros. These guys play the music just like the old timers, but without the poor sound of acoustic and early electric recording.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, March 05, 2008 - 09:00 pm:

A good place to listen to early jazz is the Red Hot Jazz archive. It has an extensive collection of recordings that may be listened to at your leisure:

http://www.redhotjazz.com/

I am an early jazz afficiando. I heard the Nighthawks live in New York about 15 years ago. Around ten years ago, I sold Vince Giordano approx. 100 1920s dance band stock arrangements.

I played piano (for money!) in a dixieland jazz band in high school and college - "The Tangletown Ramblers." Five of the seven musicians went on to become full time professionals. My good friend Charlie Caranicas, the trumpet player from the band, is now based in New York and regularly subs with Vince's band.

To see a profile of the Ramblers, click on the link below and read the article about clarinet player Fred Richardson. It's from the Twin Cities Jazz Society JazzNotes Coda newsletter. Note that two Model T enthusiasts are mentioned in this newsletter - ragtimer Rick Benjamin and yours truly, frustrated piano man Erik Johnson.

http://tcjs.org/pdf/coda%20dec%2006.pdf

Here's Charlie's website - last year he released a new CD of early jazz numbers "Move Over." It's just trumpet and stride piano:
http://charliejazz.com/biography.html

If you put "Charlie Caranicas" in YouTube, you can see some see and hear some good dixieland including a very impressive Louis Armstrong inspired stop-time chorus on "Potatoe Head Blues."

Another good jazz band that plays 1920s/1930s big band style is "Kustbandet" (translated "The Coast Band") from Sweden. Put Kustbandent in the YouTube browser to hear a good recreation of Luis Russell's "Ease on Down."

Erik Johnson
Minneapolis, MN


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 08:15 am:

Mike & all:

Been enjoying "Rapidly Rotating Records" radio show for 2 years via www.slackaction.com & look forward every Sunday evening for my e-mailed link to the new show. Great period toe tapping music.
Also, Amazon has CD's, started with Edison diamond disc CDs's & a whole list of period style CD's offered appeared. Now enjoying Gershwin plays Gershwin piano rolls. Doesn't get any better than that !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 10:08 am:

I have a console (hand crank) Victrola that has been handed down through the family complete with records.
One of my favorites is "Keep Your Head Down Fritzie Boy" by the American Quartet circa 1918.
This is the chorus,
www.earlyrecordings.com/ww1tn614.m3u


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 10:16 am:

Dennis, I have a similar Victrola that I bought at a Goodwill store in 1960 for $8. One of my records from the same era is "I'd Like to See the Kaiser with a Lily in His Hand."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger K on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 12:23 pm:

And here's some old timey stuff from the south ;-)
http://www.honkingduck.com/78s/index.php
the search function didn't work well for me today, so I list a few personal choices:

Bury Me Under The Weeping Willow by The Carter Family:
http://www.honkingduck.com/78s/listen.php?s=20005B

Otto Wood the bandit by The Carolina Buddies
http://www.honkingduck.com/78s/listen.php?s=20254A

Ain't Nobody's Buissness by Earl Johnson & His Dixie Entertainers
http://www.honkingduck.com/78s/listen.php?s=20502A

Arkansas Traveler by "Pop" Hanks and His Boys
http://www.honkingduck.com/78s/listen.php?s=20339A

The Georgia Black Bottom by The Georgia Crackers
http://www.honkingduck.com/78s/listen.php?s=20367A

In The Jailhouse Now by Jimmie Rodgers
http://www.honkingduck.com/78s/listen.php?s=20313B

and Banjo Pickin Girl by The Coon Creek Girls (a bit new, but irresistable:-))
http://www.honkingduck.com/78s/listen.php?s=20219A

If you can find the great Model T song "On The Dixie Bee Line" by Uncle Dave Macon there, you'll be able to sing along with this lyrics:

Some folks says that a Ford won't run,
Just let me tell you what a Henry done,
She left Louisville about half past one,
Well, she got into Nashville at the setting of the sun.

Chorus: On the Dixie, on the Dixie Bee-line,
Gonna rise and shine, gonna stay up to time,
Rise and shine gwine to keep up to time,
When I ride in that Henry of mine.

Henry Ford went to Mussell Shoals,
To bring to people of the South pure gold,
Let him have it says oh, my Lord,
We'll all ride to heaven on a Henry Ford.

Chorus

That old Buick, said you treated me mean,
Took all my money for to buy gasoline,
She may be warm, but I don't know,
But a Buick won't come where a Henry will go.

Chorus

Went to the mountains for to get some booze,
The Henry Ford car was the one I choose,
The officers got right on me, I say,
I pulled her wide open and made my getaway.

Chorus

Everybody knows the Henry Ford car,
Everybody knows they're the best they are
You want to take a ride just get in a Ford,
And six or seven times say: Oh my Lord


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sacchi on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 12:38 pm:

In the early days of our beloved car, from 1909 to 1917 (when the ODJB came out with their "Livery Stable Blues", starting the "jass" craze), ragtime was the big craze in popular music.

Occasional poster, 1923 Model T owner, Hershey rusty junk detective, and good friend of mine Rick Benjamin, has a fantastic 1910's style ragtime orchestra (Paragon Ragtime Orchestra), and several professionally recorded and performed commercially available albums for sale. His website is:

www.paragonragtime.com

For those of you who like this kind of music, Rick and his group are the "real deal".

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 01:25 pm:

Do any of you Gentlemen by chance know who the man is that collects the old 78's and in turn reproduces them on cassettes. He has been on TV several times, quite a character, smokes cigars and really gets into the music. The TV program has some segments where he is visiting folks and trying to buy records, and eating breakfast in a local cafe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Sacchi on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 02:36 pm:

Grady, I'm not sure of who that is, but this company (Arvheophone Records) has re-issued many very interesting 78's on CD -

www.archeophone.com/complete_catalogue.php

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 05:55 pm:

Since we have some people familiar with old music here, I'll pose this longshot question. About 1970 a friend of mine was married to an aspiring singer. She went to audition for a record producer. She didn't get the gig, but came home with an LP he had produced. The title was "What Ever Happened to 1910?" or something very similar. It featured singers and musicians who had been around in 1910, performing music of the period. I thought it was wonderful, as the old timers really captured the sound of the era. Unfortunately, my friend and his wife divorced and the LP disappeared in the process. I suppose I should have asked for it while they still had it, because I've never found a copy or even anybody who's heard of it. Anyone here know about this? A google search turned up nothing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James H. Daw on Friday, March 07, 2008 - 01:35 am:

Every year around the first week of June they have a Scott Joplin Ragtime Festival in Sedalia Missouri. People from all over the world come and play and it is free. Every performer gets 20 minutes to play in each of the 5 tents all located in walking distance of each other. It is great. We have went the last 12 years. I have seen some nice T's and other old cars there.
Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Friday, March 07, 2008 - 11:33 am:

You know, in our lifetimes, we do some stupid things. We had one of the big old Victrola wind up record players, steel needles and etc. At one time we had a big collection of the records. Well, my Brother and an Uncle used them as clay pigeons till we got caught at it. Two of the titles that I remember were the "Sinking of the Titanic" and "The Sinking of the Lusitania". Al Jolson had a lot of stuff in our collection, and etc. Like I said, I will be the first to admit I did some stupid things, we still have the player and some records in the familly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Friday, March 07, 2008 - 09:04 pm:

Steve,
I have heard of this record (What Ever Happened to 1910), I believe some friends of mine have a copy. I wll have to ask them.
T'ake care,
David D.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 12:09 am:

Dick, mine was purchased new by my (late) step fathers grand mother.
The music store where she bought it (Sherman Clay Music, Fresno Calif.) would send her the "latest hits".
It's in virtually perfect condition, complete with spare needles and a stack of records in paper jackets at least 3' high from the late teens through the early 30's.
I also have my mom's records, she was a vocalist and my dad was a Sax player before and after the war in New York, she's still alive, 87 years old.
Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Marthedal on Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 12:11 pm:

Hi Dennis,

I remember that music store!

Neil Marthedal
Fresno, CA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeffrey D. Judson on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 02:22 am:

http://www.the1920snetwork.com/

http://www.bostonpete.com/station009.html

These are 2 that I'm aware of; enjoy!

Boston Pete has other stations, if you go to their homepage.

Happy motoring! :-)

Jeffrey


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 06:18 pm:

"Hi Dennis,
I remember that music store!
Neil Marthedal
Fresno, CA"

Ahh, the good old days.

DJH
Fresno High, class of 63


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 08:04 pm:

Neil and Dennis, do you remember a diner along US 99 with a plane stuck in the roof to look like it had crashed there? I don't remember exactly where. Someplace between Fresno and Bakersfield.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Alongi on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 09:11 pm:

Bob,

Nice to know Rick Benjamin is one of us, I've been listening to his music for years, it's like going in the "Way Back" machine to 1910. His renditions & arrangements are totally authentic. Our local classical music station played it on a regular basis (they believed any music that outlived the original listener was a classic)

Alex


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brent Kleinsteuber on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 09:47 pm:

Here might be the perfect spot to post this question. I have a 1903 Edison Home Phonograph Model B that has a plate on the front stating "Bates Phonograph Parlour Middletown New York". I know what a phonograph parlour is but does anyone know where this phonograph parlour was? Im 17 and have been collecting phonographs since I was 12. This is the seventh machine I have purchased and the most expensive. And to reply above my grandfather remembers having the gramophone in the living room always cranked and ready to play. (He also remembers using the records for target practice when they had worn them out by listenning to them too much.
Brent Kleinsteuber, Wellington Ontario Canada


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Tuesday, March 11, 2008 - 08:32 am:

"Neil and Dennis, do you remember a diner along US 99 with a plane stuck in the roof to look like it had crashed there? I don't remember exactly where. Someplace between Fresno and Bakersfield."

Absolutely!
I'll be darned if I can remember the name of the place? I think the plane was an AT-6.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c5/T-6_Texan.jpg/300px-T-6 _Texan.jpg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Hall on Tuesday, March 11, 2008 - 10:21 am:

A few years ago, the California Antique Phonograph Society put out a CD of Automobile Music. It contains 21 vintage recordings of car songs,and seven are particular to the Model T Ford. I'm not sure if it is still available, but they do have a website. Another impressive site worth exploring is the University of California at Santa Barbara's "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project". http://cylinders.library.ucsb.edu/
Vintage music and antique phonographs have interested me since I was a kid (now a long time ago). My Centennial Brass Band does period concerts (from the 1850-1875 period.... too early for cars) on Civil War vintage horns. It's a real pleasure to see people enjoy a seldom-heard musical treat from the past.


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