Rear axel bearing sleeve removal question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Rear axel bearing sleeve removal question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gentry on Wednesday, March 05, 2008 - 07:32 pm:

I have rear end housings with roller bearing sleeves that won't come out using the removal tool sold by the parts vendors. They are probably rusted in place. How do I remove them?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Martin on Wednesday, March 05, 2008 - 08:19 pm:

The sleeve has a "bump" that fits into a depression in the axle. Sometimes you can rotate the tool to collapse the diameter enough to release them. I had a set that I had to attach a couple foot long piece of chain to the tool with a long bolt, and attach the other end to a trailer hitch. Then holding the axle housing, yank it away from the hitch taking the slack out of the chain, yanking out the sleeve. A little extreme, but worked for me.
Good luck....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, March 05, 2008 - 08:35 pm:

If you can use a punch in the depression from the outside, you might be able to break it loose at least at the side where the depression is. That might just be enough to start it moving. With the puller in place and the button in the hole in the sleeve for the grease you must twist it in the direction of the slot from the direction of the hole for the oil fitting. I think that would be clockwise for the left side and counterclockwise for the right side.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 04:53 pm:

I have tried everything I can think of short of cutting the sleeves out, including the two suggestions, all to no avail. I guess I will have to try using a high speed carbide burr, since I can't think of anything else. I am surprised no one has encountered this problem before. With early rear ends at a premium, I would think a number of folks have dealt with this problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Thompson on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 05:15 pm:

If you have a welder you can put a smal bead on the sleeve, it should curl up enough to get it out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenny Edmondson on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 05:28 pm:

Richard, Without bending or distorting the axle housing, try driving a slender punch or good heavy screw driver between the race and housing next to where the two halves of the race meet on both sides of the race. Spray some of the rust-buster / WD40 stuff in between there to help loosen things and then try your tool again. I've not tried it, but the welding thing would probably work if you have access to a welder.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 05:51 pm:

I had two in a 13 rear end that were buggers. I finally put my sleeve tool in there after cleaning out the hole good,inserted a 1/2 drive extension through the handle of the tool and hold axle housing in a vise,jerked it sideways so the bump was forced out of it's recess. Then they came out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Bunner on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 09:39 pm:

sometimes just adding a little heat to the housing helps as well if there is any old sludge at all in there. it boils it to the dry places it needs to go. Don't get to over zealous with it though... just enough to get it hot and start it smoking. Then twist it in a vice like Jack said.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Bunner on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 09:42 pm:

you could also soak the ends in phosphoric acid in a steel bucket over night as well. $5 at Ace Hardware (green stuff in plastic bottle) to dissolve the rust. I bought two bottles of that stuff and continuously use it on old parts. If you leave them soaking in there for a week. They will be like new with absolutely no rust at all...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 09:46 pm:

Some of the old time sleeve pullers work much better then the ones sold by some of the parts vender's. Try to borrow a Stevens puller from someone, they work very well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Hudson on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 10:00 pm:

Richard- What Michael suggested concerning heat worked for me. I played a benzomatic torch back and forth on the end of the axle housing till it smoked. I then waited till it had completely cooled. The puller then worked it out a bit. Then I used a visegrip to curl the sleeve as I rotated it out the rest of the way. Good luck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Calloway on Friday, March 07, 2008 - 09:23 am:

I'm with you Kim. When I rebuilt the rear in my '23 last fall, a club member nearby kindly lent me the entire Stevens tool set for rear axle rebuilding. If someone in your area has that set, try to borrow the puller. As a matter of fact, if you haven't done the drive shaft yet, the Stevens tools for pulling, repacing, and reaming the front bushing are the best I've seen. Makes the job a breeze. Ask around.


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