Pianting

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Pianting
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By michael amenta on Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 09:23 pm:

i want to paint the wood on my 22 TT i know many may think this is not a good thing but my mind is made up and i was wondering what others have used for paint?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Sizemore on Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 09:29 pm:

Thats Cool
JS


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 09:37 pm:

I know a man that mixed paint thinner with used engine oil and stained his truck with it. It sealed the wood but gave it an old look. My smeller is not very good, so I didn't smell it. I don't know how it smelled to others, but it looked very good.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 09:48 pm:

Whether anyone else thinks it is or isn't a good idea, it IS your truck (and I like it!).

I won't make any statements that imply I know anything for certain since wooden bodies aren't an area I can claim a lot of experience, but I will say get you some really good wood cleaner (such as deck cleaner) to remove any weathered surface. No paint will adhere well to wood that has weathering unless that outer layer is removed. From what I have done with wood that I intend to hold up to weather is using a good-grade oil-base outdoor primer (such as Benjamin-Moore Underbody) after the wood is completely chemically-cleaned and dry. It is a sandable primer that can be smoothed and re-coated to get a slick finish. Then over that an oil-base exterior paint, again I'd recommend a good grade and not something from the economy shelf.

Depending on whether you are after a "brand-new" look or having it look it's age, you might want to consider a colored stain. They can be mixed in any tint, and give a great look to old wood that still helps retain the "old" look. Unless you are planning a total refinish on everything underneath that is visible, I'd go with the stain since a slick shiny new paintjob will look a bit odd otherwise.

Just my opinion, and I'm sure others will have varying ideas which I encourage you to read and consider. :-) I am sure there are others that know far more than I do in dealing with wood bodiese with. I do wish you all the luck though...really like the truck!
respectfully
Ray


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 09:53 pm:

Another cosideration would be a good chemical cleaning, then several liberal coats of boiled linseed oil until it won't soak anymore up. It seals the wood well and soaks in deep, but adds no color other than darkening it somewhat. Unlike what we think of as oil, it dries since it is the same thing in oil-base paint just minus the coloring pigments. With the chemical cleaning, the wood will look new and very light in color, so it's not like you'd be going to a darker shade than the truck is presently. I'd recommend experimentation though before commiting to something, only to find you don't like the end result as far as color is concerned.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London on Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 09:55 pm:

When I painted a wood vehicle before I did it sort of like I would a house, and I used the same process when painting wood wheels. Both looked great even after many years. I wanted a nice finish, but I did not want or expect it to look like metal.

Clean the wood very well and sand it. I would not use any filler because eventually it will crack and fall out; the wood will flex and the cars shake and rattle so much. Avoid automotive lacquer primer / surfacers because they won't stick to the wood as well and they are brittle.

Use a good oil base wood primer like for a home exterior. Expect to give it 2 coats; the first will just act as a basic sealer that soaks into the wood, the second will make the primer coat more uniform. I'd stay with a high quality paint, like Dunn Edwards, and avoid the Home Depot materials. If you brush it try to keep the brush marks nice and uniform, and sand out as much as you reasonably can. If you can spray it you'll have a nicer finish. I'd brush the first, sand it, touch up the spots that sand through to wood, then spray prime the entire body.

For color spray it with a basic automotive synthetic enamel. It will retain a good amount of flexibility for a long time. You can get something like 'Western' brand single stage synthetic enamel in a number of basic colors and it's very reasonably priced. you'll be pleasantly surprised by this paint. you can easily spend more money and by a modern high-tech paint, but for a T truck with a wood body you really don't need to do that. Even a synthetic enamel gives a nicer finish then most paints they had 'back in the day'.

Take pictures and post them!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Alongi on Sunday, March 09, 2008 - 01:19 am:

This maybe totally off the wall, but it's period. I have a book of Craftsman house plans from 1910 by Gustav Stickley, for flooring he recommended a stain made from nails allowed to rust in a jar of vinegar.

Alex


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Sunday, March 09, 2008 - 09:57 am:

There are many ways to protect it and keep it looking old. As Ray said, boiled lindseed oil will do a great job of protecting it. If you want the "new" look, you want a high gloss oil base paint over a good primer. I would figue at least 4 coats before it finishs out smooth and glossy. It is wood!

If it was mine, I would be thinking of some graphics too. That would dress it out really nice. Something like "Beaver Creek Gristmill" or "Sanders Sawmill".

Maybe some pin striping to highlight the raised panals on the bed too.

Great looking truck, Good luck,
Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne in Malvern, PA on Sunday, March 09, 2008 - 12:35 pm:

I think graphics add alot to an old truck, and you can be really creative with colors since in general the truck was meant as advertizing as well as for work. Go to the library, or your local Barnes and Nobel, and look for books on commercial vehicles to get ideas. Also museums with old trucks. I got lots of ideas for my '29 AA Stakebed from trucks at the Beulieu Museum in the UK which has lots of period trucks in settings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR. on Sunday, March 09, 2008 - 09:11 pm:

I used Valspar Ultra Premium house paint along with their compatible primer for mine, in the satin finish. They are latex products, so you can clean up the brush with water. The paint covers well with one coat, the texture of the wood grain shows through nicely, and I am very pleased with the results.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Sizemore on Sunday, March 09, 2008 - 09:36 pm:

Mike, do you have a front 1/4 shot of your truck?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR. on Sunday, March 09, 2008 - 09:46 pm:

John -- Not since it has been painted and the body put back on the chassis. I'll take one tomorrow and post it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred McDonald on Sunday, March 09, 2008 - 11:49 pm:

Michael: I pressure washed the wood and then sanded it with a jitterbug sander and 300 grit paper. Then painted the wood with exterior porch enamel. The part of the wood that was natural on the sides was coated with 2 coats of clear urathine. Don't have a picture of the bed but it turned out really nice.
Fred McDonald1926 Ton Truck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR. on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 02:07 pm:

John -- Here are a couple of pics. The cowl is from a 26-7 Coupe or Sedan. (The white stuff on the top is batting, which will be covered by black vinyl.)




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Pappas on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 04:18 pm:

If you like a natural look, the sailboat guys use a product (like a natural oil finish) called "Deks Olje." I'm not sure of the spelling; it's a Scandinavian product. But what they like about it is that unlike varnishes (polyrurethanes etc.) is that you don't have to sand it all off when it's time to upgrade it after outdoor weathering. You can add a coat to the existing finish after just cleaning it off. You might look into it as perhaps being superior to linseed oil and some of those type products.
I personally would paint the wood, but both ways will look good: oil finish or paint!
Good luck and let us know what you decide and share some pictures too!!!
John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Otto baron on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 04:37 pm:

The natural look is great, but paint would probably protect it better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By michael amenta on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 04:52 pm:

heres a front shot of it fresh out of the barn and running for the first time in 45 years. cant really call this one a barn find since it was bought by my grandfather brand new. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By michael amenta on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 04:54 pm:

i want to thank all the guys on here again for the great advice


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 05:01 pm:

Michael,neat old truck.


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