Paint mess

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Paint mess
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By speed-o on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 01:57 pm:

A now disowned child of mine sprayed a good layer of enamal paint on my car. The cars paint is poly enamal. Can I get the spray paint off without harming the cars paint job. Is there clearer, solvent, a scrapper? Can I try a disposable razor? A raxor blade? Any tool?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 02:43 pm:

The best thing to do would be to go to the Auto Parts Store and get a can of Turtle Wax Glazing Compound (Green plastic can). It is a very fine abrasive for removing oxidized paint, overspray, or for use in the last stages of compounding paint to a high, mirror like gloss. If that does not remove it, try the Turtle Wax Rubbing Compound (red plastic can), which is a regular rubbing compound for smoothing out newly painted finishes after wet sanding to remove spray and scratches. If it getas it off, follow with the glazing compound.

Usually, a very fine wet sanding is required on newly applied auto finishes with very fine paper (600, 800, 1000, ending with 1500, which can be obtained from McMaster Carr. www.mcmaster.com), but I don't believe this will be required as aerosol paints do not stick very well to auto finishes, especially if wax has been applied, as is the case with most auto finishes. Good luck. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By speed-o on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 03:11 pm:

thanks jim. will give it a try.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael K Johnson on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 03:25 pm:

I would go to the 800 number of the "poly" enamel support line of you automotive paint mfr. and do the same also to the spray can company if you have the information. Sometimes their are solvents that will work and sometimes not but very, very complicated chemistry.

So if you are skeptical, a mechanical compound might work, but I would wait for an expert solution. If you are doing the compounding then wait until the overspary paint cures because it could soften the upercoat of the enamel. At this point we don't know what it is.

There are a lot of goffy teenagers that "tag" or spraypaint things, mainly railcars in Chicago. There is a chance that a local body and paint shop might have some experience with this. High volume large shops are usually best and know more. If all else fails this might be a possible source of help.

P.S.: If it were my car and if all else failed, I would start with 1000 grit paper and then go to a finer cream coumpound but it really depends on the surface thickness and what condition your automotive paint is in. If you take it to a paint shop they can most likely measure the paint surface thickness and give you an idea of what you are in for.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 03:39 pm:

Speed-o, If you decide to wet sand before compounding, I would try the finest 1500 wet/dry sandpaper first. When I said 600, 800, 1000 and 1500, I was sinply giving you samples of what is considered very very fine sandpaper. I did not mean to imply that you must go through all of the numbers before getting to 1500. That may thin out your finish too much and why use the rougher grits when finer grit and less sanding may do the job and leave fewer scratches to have to compound out.

When you go to the McMaster Carr site, type in 2600 in the search box. That is the page that the 1500 and 2000 grit waterproof papers can be found. #6835A32 (15 sheets, 1500 grit )and #6835A31 (15 sheets, 2000 grit). When you order, you may want to order some 600, 800 and 1000 for future use. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 04:11 pm:

Relax, this is not as big of a thing as you think. I would use grease and wax remover. I always used Dizzler 440, available at any auto paint supply. Apply liberally to a paper towel and wipe the area, use a dry paper towel to wipe it off, repeat untill it is all removed. You will find that the fresh enamel will rub right off and the old enamel should stay put. However, if you are too agressive you will start to rub the old finish off too. The new paint is softer and should not be a problem to remove. Better yet, have your kid do it under your supervision, there is a valuable oportunity to teach here if you can see past your initial anger. Be sure your son wears rubber gloves and eye protection. I always used my bare hands but mabey that is why I had cancer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 04:14 pm:

All depends on what the "good" paint is. If it is urethane or another catalyzed paint, you can use lacquer thinner to take off spray bomb paint and it won't hurt the "good" paint. If it is acrylic lacquer or enamel, then tread lightly. Some bomb painnt has enough solvent that it can get a good bite into un-catalyzed paints
Ray


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By speed-o on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 04:20 pm:

Yes Ray it is Urethane and has been on maybe 6 months. The spray paint is your normal household enamal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 04:21 pm:

I am going to disagree with lacqure thinner. I worked in an automotive paint shop for a few years and I can tell you from first hand experience that lacqure thinner is too harsh, it will easily remove the spray paint, the paint under it, and the primer under that. Grease and wax remover is less harsh and is used on all paint surfaces to clean prior to repainting, but will cut through fresh enamel like lacqure thinner.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 04:31 pm:

Well, I've not seen a urethane once set that lacquer thinner will hurt, and never seen a bomb paint that thinner won't immediately dissolve. Still, I'd try a couple other things first. The suggestions made in other posts would be my first suggestion as well. Other things will soften bomb paint too, so you might try wetting the bomb paint with Mirror-Glaze, good wax, or hand compound for a few minutes and see what happens. I say Mirror-Glaze because the grit is very fine and won't cut like compound, which will dull the fresh-sprayed shine on urethanes. A good wax will go a long way taking off bomb paint. Ever tried to wax bomb paint? Most can't handle it and softens to the point the rag will stick.

I'd try the wax first, then Mirror-Glaze, then go to enamel reducer. Only lacquer thinner as a last resort. Start mild, just so by some remote
chance the paint on your car is something I'm not familiar with and my suggestions cause a major problem. Don't want Vinnie and Guido paying me a visit:-)
Ray


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 04:35 pm:

Jeff, you're entitled to your opinion, but I've been painting for 25 years and never saw a urethane that lacquer thinner will hurt. It was developed for the purpose of aircraft and such to resist fuel and other solvents.

I'm not recommending a bath in the stuff, as urethane paint is a plastic and thinner will damage it, but a wipe with a thinner cloth will not do any damage. Still I'd only do it as a last resort, as I agree with you to the point that if it's not necessary, there's no reason to do it.
Ray


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 04:41 pm:

Jeff, I meant that in a respectful manner to you. When I say it won't hurt it, I mean wiping. I use epoxy primers and use lacquer thinner sprayed on to soften it if it has sat over a week or two before recoating. Never had it do anything to urethane primers or paints, but then again I won't "wet" even cured urethanes with thinner for the sake of "that one time I could be wrong" :-).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By michael amenta on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 04:41 pm:

just a side note . if you decide to use laquer thinner use a fast dry it will evaporate quickly


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Elkins on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 04:43 pm:

Exactly! Thanks Michael...gun-cleaning thinner, also referred to as "cheap thinner" would be the only way to go if all else fails.

I still think that Jim's suggestion will probably do the job without going to the extremes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Dailledouze on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 05:33 pm:

Depending on how old the new paint is, as well as how old the old paint is, how well it stuck etc. you may be able to power wash it off. I know in NYC they used power washers to wash tagged trains.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDaniel (Indiana Trucks) on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 09:14 pm:

One thing I have not seen anyone say is if you use any kind of thinner, don't use so much it gets the surface wet. A little dampness on a clean cloth will go a long way and don't work one spot to long so it wont soften the good paint. If you wet sand the top off and polish your good paint you will have a spot that will always be smoother and shine better than the rest of your car unless you wet sand and buff out the whole thing.

Anyone ever think to try a little gas on a rag? If the spray can stuff is fresh and the paint under it cured it might just wipe right off.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 09:34 pm:

I have cleaned over spray from stuff with laquar thinner.have the item outside and it will dry quick.Trouble is if you have to keep trying,eventually damage could happen.Decals,dont get laquer thinner near them.
When you say Poly enaml,I aint never heard of that.




At work alot of our road signs were vandalized and it was most of the time a cheap spray paint that was used.
I would replace the signs and they would get messed up again.
The boss thought I was being wastefull and came out to the site 1 day with some chemicals and was going to really show me how we could save the state money by rubbing off the graffti.Yea right.
There wasnt a single chemical that we could apply to the spray paint that had been on the sign more than a few minutes that didnt cut into the colors applied over the Scotchlite.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 10:01 pm:

I would simply buff it off with a wool bonnet on a buffer, and some fine compound, it will be gone in a second. I removed some grafitti off a truck door that way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By melvin birks on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 10:18 pm:

Try 3712S Dupont reducer. It will remove the laquer paint and not harm the eruthane paint. It is also good to clean bare metal before painting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By melvin birks on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 10:20 pm:

Try 3712S Dupont reducer. It will remove the laquer paint and not harm the eruthane paint. It is also good to clean bare metal before painting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 10:22 pm:

On newly painted brand new corporate jet aircraft we often have to paint a temporary tail number because foreign based owners like to take delivery in one country and then re - register it in their home country after the money has changed hands to save money on taxes.

We paint the temporary numbers on top of the urethane using black spray can enamel. When it is time to remove the enamel we use Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK). The enamel comes off and the urethane is not damaged. I see no reason lacquer thinner would not work just as well.

Royce


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Nicholson on Thursday, March 13, 2008 - 11:09 pm:

Well in our body shop, we use PPG dx 330 which is simular to the 440 that Jeff mentioned. We have used it alot to remove spray bomb paint off from auto finishes. It doesn't smear the spray bomb paint around like lac. thinner.

Just my 2.5 cents worth!(everthing else is going up, why not free advice!)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lurk-o on Friday, March 14, 2008 - 05:46 am:

speed-o,

Check your e-mail. PPG's DX 320 sounds like the ticket.

lurk-o


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Halpin on Friday, March 14, 2008 - 09:00 am:

I'm surprised that nobody has this question.
Has the car been waxed (polished) since it was painted?
If so, the Turtle Wax Glazing Compound will probably remove the spray paint (and only the spray paint) quite easily.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Nicholson on Friday, March 14, 2008 - 10:51 am:

Dennis, I guess on my part anyway, it was just assumed the car had been waxed at one point or another, that is why the 440, 330 and 320 work so well because they are wax and grease removers which removes the wax under the spray paint, thus just wiping it off without alot of elbow grease. Good question though!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Bunner on Friday, March 14, 2008 - 11:01 am:

try mineral spirits on a small spot.


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