Wood Wheel

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: Wood Wheel
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Friday, March 21, 2008 - 08:06 pm:

Gentlemen,
My 1919 has a wooden steering wheel and the dove-tailed joints are loose. I want to refit it with the very best glue available. In my old boating days we used "Resorsonal" (or something like that) and it was terrific, a two-part product if I remember correctly. I understand that it was destroying our planet, so it's banned in California. What is the very best glue to use that is available here in CA?
My thanks again for your advice.
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Art Wilson on Saturday, March 22, 2008 - 03:36 am:

Hi Bob
Fine Woodworking has had several articles on glue and glue joints. One of their tests showed that Titebond II performed as well or was superior to all others tested with properly prepared and adequately clamped joints. One thing they mentioned was that it is important to sand the glue joint surface if it is not freshly cut. This is because wood oxidizes as it ages which reduces the strength of the glued joint. Also they said that adequate clamping is required to minimize the amount of glue in the joint since the glue by itself is not very strong.

Because of the nature of the finger joints in your steering wheel I doubt that they can be adequately clamped once they are cleaned and sanded. I would suggest using a structural epoxy on the finger joints. It has good adhesion, strength and gap filling ability.

Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Jeandrevin on Saturday, March 22, 2008 - 09:01 am:

I would use titebond II in a well cleaned joint, then use a ratchet strap around the wheel as a clamp. Leave it cure at least 4 hours before handling, and leave it cure over night before stressing it. If you are going to stain it, I would do that BEFORE glewing, being careful not to get stain in the finger joint. Let the stain dry well first.Then, when you clamp it, make sure you clean off ALL the eccess glew that oozes out with a damp cloth right away.
Good luck,
Tim


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