New heater for T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2005: New heater for T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Braughton on Wednesday, December 14, 2005 - 04:30 pm:

Would this work for a heater in a 1924 Coupe? Havenít cut the hole through the fire wall yet. Trying to make up my mind about it, would it be worth it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James R. Patrick on Wednesday, December 14, 2005 - 04:50 pm:

I'd think long and hard about it. It may introduce warm air into the passenger compartment, but will also introduce dirt and oil residue from the oil breather cap which is located right under your proposed heater opening. If you have ever opened your hood after the engine has gotten good and hot, you will have seen that plenty of hot oil mist comes out of that breather and I'd hate to see that mist blown onto the legs and up the dress of your passenger by the fan, as well as polute your interior. That front seat, while nice for spoonin', does not allow any room for escape from an angry woman. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Frink on Wednesday, December 14, 2005 - 04:54 pm:

You would get much more heat if the tube was connected to a shield that wrapped around the exhaust manifold. I am afraid that you will find that the planned postioning of the heat tube will not give off much heat.
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Braughton on Wednesday, December 14, 2005 - 05:10 pm:

Havenít thought about the oil vapors, had worried about manifold leaking and exhausts fumes come though if I put shield around the manifold. What about making the tubing longer and rapping it around in front of the motor. I also wanted this so that I could remove it during the summer months.
Carl


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Alongi on Thursday, December 15, 2005 - 12:03 am:

"Carl,

My '22 Coupe came with an aftermarket heater (the car came from upstate New York) It's a 2 piece cast iron sleeve, top & bottom, bolted together about 6" down from the packing nut on the exhaust, with a air inlet in front & an outlet that connects to an adjustable register in the floor board, it's just a grid with a sliding cover underneath. I had to take it off in the summer,it was too hot, While I had it out I had it sandblasted & powder coated & it looks brand new, you may be able to make something similar out of sheet metal, I'd attach a photo but, I haven't set up my scanner yet, (yes this is my first computer, Model T mentality, I've finally entered the 20th century). This is the only one I've seen of this type, all the ad's in the old "Clymer Scrapbooks" (I had a complete set but after many moves can't find them) show heater's with a sheet metal shroud around the exhaust manifold coming up through a register in the floorboards. I've also seen the same setup in higher priced cars such as Studebaker & even Packard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Braughton on Thursday, December 15, 2005 - 12:44 am:

Alex Thanks for the information will try to figure out something like that. Please post a picture when you can.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bharper on Thursday, December 15, 2005 - 11:42 am:

Carl,
My '24 Coupe has a hole in the firewall just about where your picture shows the tube making contact. Whatever heater setup had been there was
long gone by the time I got the car.
I hope to create something to provide a bit of heat in the car. It was minus 12 degrees this morning; "A tad chilly around the edges". Had to jack up a rear wheel to get it started for the drive to work. ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Rudzik on Thursday, December 15, 2005 - 11:47 am:

I would wrap header tape around the manifold and the pipe to increase the amount of heat you would gain. I don't believe you will get much heat open to the air as it is. Header tape can be bought at the Eastwood company.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Dolfin on Thursday, December 15, 2005 - 12:50 pm:

I think it would work better if the pipe was thicker to hold more heat, maybe a piece of schedule 80 pipe with a flexible piece at the end where it goes thru the firewall. Whats shown in the picture looks thin and I don't think will hold enough heat to transfer to the interior of the car. I have not made one of these but the ones I have seen on Model As are heavy cast iron.
Let us know how it works out,

Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger A. Price on Thursday, December 15, 2005 - 02:22 pm:

I seem to remember in some of the Model A parts catalogs a manifold heater was for sale. I wonder if it would adapt to a Model T.
Just wondering.
Rog


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel Denis Chicoine, MD on Thursday, December 15, 2005 - 03:01 pm:

I thought one of the venders had a manifold heater, but I can't find it now. I'll keep looking. It sure would be nice in the winter up here!
Noel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By MikeDolfin on Thursday, December 15, 2005 - 03:28 pm:

I wonder how adapting a manifold cooker would work? Cut some louvres or vents in front and a duct thru the firewall on the back. It could easily be modified to make it a better heat sink.


Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By johnd on Thursday, December 15, 2005 - 07:01 pm:

Doc and the rest they actually made T manifold heaters just like the A, I have an extra one presently, also the sheet-metal that goes over it, My TT came with a 2 pc pipe that goes around the crook of the tailpipe with inlet for air in to push hot air up into the grate that goes in the floor. Really neat, it is held in place with 3 hose clamps, and then you just take it off in the summer. danuser88@socket.net


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek on Thursday, December 15, 2005 - 08:22 pm:

There was talk in the Model A crowd a few years back about over heating and warping exhaust valves if the manifold heater was installed in moderate to warm weather. I do not know if this was ever proven but might be a consideration. I take the manifold heater off my Model A most of the year as it is usually warm 8 months of the year down this far south. By the way, the cast iron repro unit I have on my '31 Sedan is woefully inadequate because the inlet which is behind the radiator fan does not flair out enough to catch much air. If I lived in a colder climate I would attach some type of larger funnel shaped piece to the front....Michael P.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim on Thursday, December 15, 2005 - 09:47 pm:

http://www.reddyparts.com/model_t_heater.htm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Friday, December 16, 2005 - 08:59 pm:

Here's a NOS exhaust pipe heater that I got to put on my center door that puts the heated air up through the floor board saving putting a hole in the firewall. It is made of cast iron but I had planned at one time to reproduce them in cast aluminum but dropped the project for fear of limited interest. Bob

\image[t heater]t heatert heater 1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roland Palmatier -- Durham, NH on Saturday, December 17, 2005 - 12:50 am:

Bob, It looks good to me. Suggest putting a funnel on the intake to force more air through it. I'll buy, if reasonable. Regards, Roland


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim on Saturday, December 17, 2005 - 10:32 am:

I want one too if the price is right, I'll need one for the backseat too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Saturday, December 17, 2005 - 11:25 am:

OK, what do you think is a reasonable price? The problem when starting a project like this the up front cost to produce the item compared to the possible number that will sell. Couple that with having vendors market the item which may increase the sales but for them to sell it your price has to be deduced from your original suggested selling price so they make their share and so it goes.

Althrough this heater only required making up two cores for the inlet and outlet it's still required some set up time to start the production. Some of my projects have gotten very involved to produce. Finding materials, tools for machining and the hours spent making fixtures and final assembling and testing to then satuate the present market after a dozen sales or so as was the case with my coil tester project.

\image[two styles2]two styles2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Alongi on Saturday, December 17, 2005 - 12:01 pm:

Bob, This is same heater I was talking about & believe me it throws out the heat. I took my 7 year old grandson to the store & he asked me to close the windshield because he as too cold (here people think 68 is cold) 5 minutes later he asked me to open it again because it was too hot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Rudzik on Saturday, December 17, 2005 - 12:08 pm:

I the book "Ford Model T Catalog of Accessories," there is a section headed, "Magazine Suggestions for Improving Your Model T." On page 90 the picture shows the use of a 40 inch, rain spout supported by wires and encasing the exhaust pipe. Just in front of the rear seat of the sedan a 2" by 3" square ducting has been added to the pipe and runs to the floor allowing warm air to enter the car and keep the passengers in the warm glow of a summer afternoon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Saturday, December 17, 2005 - 12:16 pm:

Alex, I would like to see a picture of the adjustable register that was used with this setup and also was a funnel of some type placed on the front to increase air flow?

My dad used to tell me how they would retard the spark so the exhaust pipe would heat up faster for instant heat on cold days. Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim on Saturday, December 17, 2005 - 03:22 pm:

Alex, we're talking about warming up people in the car on a 28 degree day. A single match will warm up your coupe too much on a 68 degree California day. Come to the northeast, it was zero out when I woke up a few days ago.


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