Basic Mechanics

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Basic Mechanics
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Zahorik on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 11:36 am:

I am installing two new E Brake cam bushing in my 1926 rear axle. The old bushing came out with only a small amount of difficulty. After cleaning up the material, the first bushing went in OK, but I could only get the second bushing in about 1/2", when it stopped. I removed the bushing and inspection of the brass (bronze) showed that just ahead of the leading edge of the bushing, the brass had bunch up and effectively stopped the advance of the bushing. So.... I recleaned the cast iron with some 220 wet dry paper oiled and supported by a wooden dowel. I did this until the inside was just clean. I filed the knobs (they are small but effective) off and tried the bushing from the other side. Same problem. Pulled out the bushing and measured (as best as I could). The unpressed end of the bushing measured 0.875", the pressed end measured 0.863". The cast iron hole measured 0.860". The cast iron seems to be uniform. I could slide an inside caliper set at 0.860" all around the inside of the cast iron and did not see any gaps or rubs. But.... 0.015" is a lot for the bushing to crush, isn't it? I'm thinking I will need a new bushing and maybe need to hone the cast iron to a larger size. Before I do anything, I'm looking for comments.
Thanks
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, Mostly in Dearborn on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 11:48 am:

I had the identical problem last week. I ended up sanding the OD of the bushing on my belt sander because the first one did exactly what you describe.

I have a new vise and also own a hydraulic press now from the episode. I find it's costing me money to get smarter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Scott Owens on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 12:00 pm:

Hi Mike, You have a bad bushing. It should be straight from one end to the other and have about .0015 - .002 thousand crush. Start with a good part and life will be good. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Zahorik on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 12:15 pm:

I think the only reason that this bushing is this way is because I had pressed it partly into the cast iron. The cast iron crushed the end of the bushing. Should the cast iron hole be larger than 0.860"?
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, Mostly in Dearborn on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 12:32 pm:

Mike, As I mentioned, I had the same problem. If your housing had a bushing in it, then it was manufactured correctly and the new bushing is wrong. Don't modify an original part to fit a reproduction bushing.

When I reduced the OD, it went in with a light press and I reamed the ID to size.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Zahorik on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 12:50 pm:

There was a bushing in the casting and the cast iron hole looks good. I didn't have an extra bushing to measure, because it was already installed. I don't want to enlarge the cast iron because there is no way back. OK, I'll try and cut the bushing down. There is nothing critial here anyway.
Thanks
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Zahorik on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 01:19 pm:

Called Lang's and ask 'Steve to mic the OD of a new bushing, He did several and they were measuring 0.872-0.873" so my bushing measurement could be the difference between mic's. I cut 0.010" off the OD and the bushing went in OK. Maybe my housing hole was not the machine job in "the day". Anyway it's in.
Thanks
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nathan Bright on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 02:52 pm:

---MORE RELATED QUESTIONS TO BE ANSWERED PLEASE--- how far is the bushing supposed to be in? there was a discrepancy between the two existing bushings on my car. also, should you heat the rivits when riviting on the cam arm?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, Mostly in Dearborn on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 02:57 pm:

I pressed the bushing in so that it was flush on the backing plate side closest to the brake lining and cam.

I also noticed that the replacement cam shaft was about an 1/8" longer than the one I took out so there is a gap between the boss and the lever.

I peened the rivet pin cold and did not heat anything.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 06:00 pm:

Original bushings were bronze, which is harder than brass and wouldn't collapse and tear the end when pressing it in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Zahorik on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 06:36 pm:

My bushing are nearly flush, there is a slight protrution. I also peen the rivets cold. What is the discrepancy you mention?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nathan Bright on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 06:44 pm:

the bushing on the drivers side had a notch into it so that the head of the cam could fit down inside it. it is possible that this was just worn in over time... but im not sure :/ I havent taken apart the other side yet so all i know about it is it is very worn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Zahorik on Monday, January 14, 2013 - 07:35 pm:

Probably was wear. I've seen that on some swap meet pieces.


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