How many kids get to drive T's ???

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: How many kids get to drive T's ???
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 01:24 am:

I was wondering how many kids actually get to drive T's and how many want to drive them..
We have a host of great little back roads around where l live and my kids,9,13,14 all drive ( with me in the car )and love doing so......admittedly if we get caught... l'm in the doo doo.





Channen's entertainment for the day, she did a great job of driving, stopping and starting. Not bad for a cluey 13 y/o.

David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Whaley, Georgetown Ontario Canada on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 01:41 am:

David,

That's great! The smile says it all...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Scott on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 05:34 am:

Yep My son drove the T out of the shed the other day. He thought he was just it. He is only 13 as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 07:31 am:

I taught all of my 4 kids to drive a T, soon as they could reach the controls. Many of their friends as well. Even had our exchange student from Germany behind the wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Olsen on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 07:39 am:

Huh, my older daughter asked if I would teach her to drive when the speedster is done just today. I wonder if she'd be allowed to use it for her driver's test.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Ireland, Montrose, Iowa on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 07:41 am:

Our 13 year old grandson plans on visiting this July for a week. #1 reason for both him and I are to learn to drive the Model T. I just bought and mailed to him the MTFCA DVD on learning to start and drive the Model T so that he can be all prepared. I can't wait! Grandpa.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 08:00 am:

LOL Chris - when I took my driving test to get my license, the DOT guy that rode with me said "I used to get a thrill from surfing huge waves in Hawaii, now I just do this. It's WAY scarier and more thrilling but easier on my body." I just cracked up laughing, he continued "About twice a week something happens while someone is taking their driving test and I'm completely and totally convinced we are going to die."

I'm pretty sure any driving tester would not appreciate an attempt to take the test in a Model T. The look on their face would be funny though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 08:20 am:

I have taught three of my nieces, at ages 7,8,and 12. The 7 year old had driven 5 different Model T's by the time she was 12, including friends of mine cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 08:25 am:

A driving test is a driving test, not a car test. If the driver is able to drive the car as the tester directs, what car it is should be irrelevant.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Conklin on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 08:36 am:

My grandkids at ages 7,8,and 9 have driven my running old chassis around the yard. The throttle was clamped in the idle position. The 7 year old couldn't reach the peddles so he sat in my lap and steered.
They were having fun and so was I! Since they live out of town this has become a must do when ever they visit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve osborne on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 09:52 am:

when our restoration is done my son will drive, He will turn 18 before we are done so I will likely just do the registration and license in his name, as long as it will not count as an asset and mess with his college financial aid.

oz


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach & Big Bear on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 10:51 am:

We had a 1912 Paddy wagon and when Dave was five and Bill (now the owner of a 1915 Model T Touring car with white tires) was three, we were entered in the Diamond Jubilee parade in Compton California. The car had stock gearing, a three speed Warford and a Ruckstell.I put the car in low Ruckstell and low Warford and set it at a fast idle. Dave at five used the brake handle to make the car go and stop. He knew what he was doing and me, dressed as a policeman stood on the rear platform with the brass rails. We won third place.



12 T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Deckman, Ogden Utah on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 11:05 am:

That smile in these pictures is why I want to start a T club and call it "Nexas T's"

(Nexas as in Star Trek,"Its like you are wrapped in joy")!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 11:22 am:

My 13 year old grandson has been driving my Model T's , John Deere tractor, and Chevrolet pickup for several years now. Last fall he got to drive a fellow Model T'ers 1967 Rolls Royce RHD coupe. I think the owner enjoyed having a twelve year old drive as much as my grandson enjoyed driving.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 12:16 pm:

I only rode with my g'pa on tours when I was younger. Now I'm 48 and have yet to drive a model t but I will soon as the coupelet is running.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 06:13 pm:

"...the coupelet is running."

That's good news, Philip -- How about starting a new thread with pictures?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 07:27 pm:

Both my children have driven the model 'T'. My daughter Josie is now 16 and just got her Learner's Permit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, Mostly in Dearborn on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 08:00 pm:

I let my young son drive my '16 on a deserted side street (many)years ago. Later, a police officer drove up and got me out from underneath the car.

Officer: I understand you let a twelve year old boy drive this car.

Me: No M'am, that's not true.

Officer: Your neighbor reported you.

Me: Well perhaps she reported me, but my son is only ten.

I was let go with a stern warning after she stopped smiling. My son continues to drive antique cars to this day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 08:25 pm:

I should start a preservation thread but that means I have to put in order over 475 photo's I've taken. Right now I'm swamped with family things. Coupelet is being neglected until mid May.

Now lets get back to kids and t's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 08:28 pm:

And here is one of my son also driving a Ford...

All I can say is to get them driving. Let anybody drive the car that shows an interest. I taught 9 members a couple of weekends ago that had never drive a model 'T'. Our hobby is dying; it is full of old people getting older.

So I repeat myself once more, let the kids have a go and drive!!! Bugger the police, places like the rally a couple of weeks ago was the ideal environment, safe and surrounded by like minded crazy folk!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 08:33 pm:

I think 1397 would be a very early Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Cook on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 09:45 pm:

Both our daughters have learned to drive our 24 Tourer. Now we have two T's, one each so they tell me. It has certainly developed their interest in the hobby. They both did part of their learner's permit hours in it. Now both very capable behind the wheel after a number of years of driving. David I agree, let people have a go at driving when the opportunity arises. Good for the hobby! Chris.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 10:07 pm:

When my son was 8 y/o, he drove our 14 Hack slowly in the 4th of July parade. Just used the throttle lever. I walked by his side. It had no doors so I could reach in to stop it if needed. The judge asked over the load speaker if he had a license. Looking back, "WHAT WAS I THINKING!" I wondered if that is why I did not get a trophy, but then him driving in the parade was the trophy!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nathan Bright on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 10:25 pm:

as far as i am concerned, its the instructors fault he/she cant drive or even understand a model T lol.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 10:28 pm:

Dear Steve, #1397 is an original South Australian registration number. As front registration plates were not compulsory at the time, the SA Ford Distributors Duncan & Fraser just stenciled the number on the radiator. Quick, cheap & effective.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 11:21 pm:

As I thought.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Paulsen - McPherson, KS on Friday, April 26, 2013 - 11:38 pm:

My oldest daughter started driving our Model T's as soon as she could reach the pedals. That was the deal I made with her when she first asked. I didn't think she would grow so quickly. I've heard that can happen with kids!

I don't have a photo of her driving one of our T's handy, but here she is driving our 1911 Brush.

Several years ago, John McAnlis wrote a column in the HCCA Gazette called "Share the good stuff, dad" that has really stayed with me. It talks about getting your kids involved and sharing your cars, especially if it is a "good" one; knowing that the "good one" is going to vary by person.

My father let me drive his 1910 Touring when I was 10 years old. It stuck with me that he trusted me with it and really spurred my interest from just a passenger to a very active participant in tours, driving, restoring, maintaining, etc.

I encourage everyone to share the good stuff no matter what that may be.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Saturday, April 27, 2013 - 02:38 am:

share the good stuff dad .... l like that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Saturday, April 27, 2013 - 06:38 pm:

Lots of fun stories here and some great pics. My granddaughter is only 7 but she's the only one I know besides myself that knows the start up procedure for the T. SHe's coming over to spend the night and will be here in a few minutes.

I've already pulled the coupe out of the portable garage and have it waiting out front. One of the first things she always asks is to go for a ride.

Love it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Rosenkrans on Sunday, April 28, 2013 - 09:21 am:

My daughter, 23, loves everything about the cars and the era. She can drive the T, A, early V8, and MB Jeep. The 1919 Speedster will be "her car" when it's done and she already has her period outfit assembled. My son, 28, likes the cars but just isn't in to them as much. I have high hopes for my new daughter-in-law though...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Sunday, April 28, 2013 - 10:07 am:

My granddaughter (5) loves to sit on my lap and steer our T around a parking lot behind our house which is vacant on Sundays. Her grandmother expresses her panic when we go off the pavement into gravel or hop over a curb. It is a hoot and we love it. The grandson (2) took his turn last visit. Their Father drove a 3 mile parade when he was 2 steering with a few corrections from me in the passenger seat and I could hit the low pedal and brake from there. All to the delight of the crowd until he got bored and fell asleep. Joy calls us "Danger Rangers".
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Partington on Sunday, April 28, 2013 - 07:14 pm:

My Beautiful Grandaughter Nicola has just spent a couple of days with me learning to drive her great grandfathers 1912 Touring. It is her 12th birthday this Wednesday the 1st May. Happy Birthday sweetheart.With GrandpaConfidenceSolograndpa's delight


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Sunday, April 28, 2013 - 08:06 pm:

My daughter learning how to drive "her" 1914 T Touring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schiebe - Plymouth, MN on Sunday, April 28, 2013 - 10:57 pm:

Here are a couple our grand children driving at the National Tour in Rutland,VT this last summer.
Carson can now reach the pedals.Cameron refreshing his skillsCourtney in our neighborhood, will get her license this year


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, April 29, 2013 - 01:46 am:

Though Mr. Ford was one serious whack-a-doodle when it came to the subject of humanities, like the proverbial broken clock that's correct twice a day, he occasionally hit the nail squarely on the head. On one such occasion, he stated, "History is mostly bunk!" And yes, for the most part, history, as taught in schools, consists of names, dates and places usually relating to wars and civil conflicts and the political results thereof—and little else. Henry was keenly aware that there was a part of American history that was peaceful, routine, productive—and interesting. His Greenfield Village museum complex would be a good example of his commitment to the preservation of that kind of history.

Now, what we're looking at is a two-fold issue:

1.) Why is it important to preserve and promote our animated brand of automotive history?

2.) How do we get a disinterested younger generation to accept the torch we so desperately long to pass?

As to the first question:
Not so long ago, when I took my Model T to a local car show, a school teacher happened to show up with a bunch of kids. She asked me how long ago this Model T had been manufactured. I told her that it had been built in 1915 and explained to her kids about how the car was an antique even before I was born (and yes, one of the kids asked my age). That began a history lesson: She explained to her children about how this car was ancient long before Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, before JFK was assassinated and even before there was such a thing as Rock & Roll. She went on about how this car had been on the road before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, before the world had heard of FDR, Winston Churchill, or Adolph Hitler; how this Model T had been built two years before the United States entered World War One and seven years before the general public had ever heard of King Tut because his tomb wasn't discovered by Howard Carter until 1922, and how, because this car was built fifty years after the end of the Civil War, its original owner could possibly have been a Union or Confederate veteran who had served under Abraham Lincoln or Jefferson Davis. Her kids were impressed. Heck, so was I.

The teacher shot some photos of her kids sitting in the Model T with her cell phone and then asked me to show them what it was like to hand-crank the engine. As it was idling, she pointed out to her kids how this very engine was powering this very car around in the days when a hand-crank was also standard equipment on a trendy gadget known as the telephone, which, in most cases back then, appeared as a wall-mounted wooden box decorated by a pair of brass bells—and how most American households didn't have one yet.

Typical of countless graying American males, I bought an automotive toy to assuage the depressing effects of a mid-life crisis, so it was very late in life for a school teacher to finally make an impression on me. Now, I look at my Model T a little differently. And I've come to realize that I'm the custodian of a living artifact, extremely significant with regard to its place in American history.

Okay, as to the second question regarding how to pass the torch to a disinterested, younger generation:
At car shows and cruise-ins, I encourage families to climb aboard and wear the period hats and the silly, stick-on handlebar mustaches and pose for cell-phone pictures with the candlestick telephone and sign my guestbook with an antique fountain-pen—and then I e-mail the photos to them as a keepsake—something to make 'em remember. It's one thing to read about the industrial revolution in a school textbook, but it's quite another to sit in it, feel it, smell the oil and unleash the hilarious, raucous alarm of the Mighty Klaxon. And when the occasion seems right, I'll risk the liability of giving a family a ride.



The local library was disinterested in using the car as a teaching aid, which kind of disappointed me, but I have higher hopes for the local public schools. I plan to talk to some principals and see whether the teachers might be interested in bringing the kids down to the parking lot for a little historical Show & Tell.

Hey, I know my own kid couldn't care less about automotive history or the old car in our garage, but done correctly (and I hope I'm doing it correctly), it's possible to reach out to a fairly large group of kids at a time. With just normal doses of TLC, the most significant automobile in world history can still be chugging along and making blue smoke when it's two centuries old—and that's a far, far cry from anything a modern car will be able to do even twenty years from today. As custodians of these wonderful, snorting, rattling, turn-of-the-20th-century relics, it's up to us to do what we can to see that when the time comes, some young person will be eager to grab the torch and run with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schiebe - Plymouth, MN on Monday, April 29, 2013 - 09:37 am:

I am very involved in our Plymouth Historical Society and each fall we have 10-15 second grade classes come for an hour to discover local Plymouth history at our museum in the Old Town Hall. It is scheduled so that the students spend time in specific areas and the final event is gathering around my Model TT for the class picture. I dress like my grandfather and explain briefly the Model T history and how this Model TT was used by my grandfather on a farm here in Plymouth, MN. The grand finale is hand cranking the truck to start it and then I have numerous add on bells, horns and wolf whistle that get the kids all "reved" up. Now that their excitement level is high we put them on the bus and they head back to school! Teachers and parents love the event and our volunteers get as much enjoyment as the children. Here is typical picture that every class takes.

PHS Second Grade Class


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Mullis on Monday, April 29, 2013 - 12:37 pm:

My granddaughter is in the process of learning.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Williams on Wednesday, May 01, 2013 - 04:08 am:

I drove my first model T when I was 11. My uncles touring car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Wednesday, May 01, 2013 - 08:44 pm:

Great pics and stories, Hey shouldn't we be getting everyone with a T to show and teach as many kids as we can to drive, love and want a T in their lives ???

None of us are getting any younger and they have to go somewhere when we go...

Parts strippers and suppliers .....

David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Paulsen - McPherson, KS on Thursday, May 02, 2013 - 12:06 am:

Well said David.

I've been thinking of commenting for the past few days about the posts that seem to have skipped a generation where grandparents are teaching their grandchildren, not their kids. I was wondering if the parents were not involved in T's when their kids were younger, or if their kids just weren't interested, or some other reason. But that's not the point.

I agree whole-heartedly that the objective should be to teach anyone and everyone willing to learn more about Model T's and other early cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Friday, May 10, 2013 - 09:42 pm:

should we organize a drive day on some protected sealed roads for the kids at some time in the future, get them driving with a point on safety for them and the car.
"Kids Drive Day ".

David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Friday, May 10, 2013 - 10:59 pm:

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Friday, May 10, 2013 - 11:03 pm:

My 7 year old granddaughter having fun with the Model T after we washed it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Saturday, May 11, 2013 - 10:11 am:

When I first began to drive, T's were still fairly new. We had one in particular that looked a lot like Mr. Paulsen's except for a flat bed on the back. It was parked under a big pecan tree in the shade in front of the house one day, my Grandmother and I were sitting on the front porch. I kept looking at the car, and told her I was going to drive it by myself, and she said "Go ahead". I knew all about the mechanics of it, had been cranking it for a long time, my Grandfather usually was driving, and I threw hay off the back or whatever. I was really just a kid, maybe 8 at the most. Anyway, I went out, fired it up, and began to drive around and around the tree. There was no way I could sit down and reach the pedals, so I drove standing up, held on to the steering wheel, and by really reaching and stretching, could reach the pedals, and that was the way I drove for a very long time. She waved me on out into the pasture, and I never looked back. So very long ago, but seems like yesterday.


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