Water Pipe Length?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Water Pipe Length?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 01:31 pm:

I have been slowly making progress with My Problem Child, a mostly 1923 Runabout. It is very nearly back together now but for one or two vexing issues. Even so, I have hopes of running the motor for the first time soon, perhaps even this coming weekend.

One of the issues that I do not fully understand is the length of the water pipe between the lower radiator outlet & the engine block inlet. The new pipe bought from one of the suppliers is nicely made and finished in a shiny powdercoat. It really looks nice.

The problem is that at 12" long it just barely fits between the engine & the radiator. There is only 1/4 to 3/8" gap between each end. To fit it, it would be necessary to scoot the hoses up onto the tube fully and then try to work them back off the tube and on to the castings with the tube held in place. That doesn't seem reasonable to me. Here is a pic:



Is this the way Ford made it? If so, why? There is very little room for the rubber hoses to do their bit as elastic vibration isolators. If this tube is oversize, how long should it be?

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 01:58 pm:

That's about the size I cut mine to. And I do exactly what you said, when I remove the pipe I slide the red hoses towards the middle and all the way on to the pipe. *shrug* I don't know what it is supposed to look like cause mine had a water pump on it when I got it. I threw that away and got a new radiator like a good T man should (Royce! lol). I found an exhaust pipe at Advance Auto that was just the right diameter, painted it black, and cut it to fit. Of course it doesn't have those nifty bulges on the end, but it doesn't leak. Also, I don't really have a reason but I figured more pipe and less hose was better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 02:00 pm:

I just changed mine and that is the length of the new one which I had compared to the very old (original?) one which was also that length.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 02:08 pm:

It's much easier to just use a piece of straight hose or a long flex hose. It isn't original, but who is to say that this method was not a period repair? How many V8's have you seen with long flex hoses instead of pipes?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Brancaccio - Calgary Alberta on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 02:31 pm:

Is there something else wrong with that motor, I don't see any oil anywhere!!!!

PS pipe looks correct to me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 02:35 pm:

Lol Chris, he's got it all back together but hasn't run it yet. There'll be plenty oil soon enough. Sure does look nice though Paul!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 03:10 pm:

The motor is oiled up but so far has only been spun on the starter motor. Nuthin leaks - yet. It really only needs the timer rod to be fitted and the motor timed in addition to installing the water pipe & hoses. We're very close now.

Here are some pics taken Sunday afternoon:





I can almost hear the roar of those mighty 20 horses . . .

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 03:17 pm:

Paul,
Given what you have to work with, I suggest using a plastic spray bottle to apply some external oil then throw a few handfuls of dirt at it. That'll make it look like an authentic T!! :-) :-)

Let us know when you get it fired up!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 03:27 pm:

The bits I have worked on look nice but the rest of the car is still a 20 footer. I have never shot video but the iPhone is supposed to be able to do that. Possibly if it actually ever does run and not catch fire or blow up I'll see if I can record the event for posterity. The motor will never be so clean again . . .

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 04:54 pm:

The clamps on your upper hose look nice and work well to tighten without cutting to hose but be careful if they are made of all stainless steel. Stainless is just slick enough that they may loosen under vibration. Don't ask me how I know!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 06:18 pm:

Thanks for the heads up on the clamp slippage, these are indeed stainless. I had the original style hoses on last time and found they only worked once. After that they needed extraordinary amounts of torque to effect a seal.

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 07:55 pm:

Note that I said all stainless. A plated plain steel screw will usually be OK. It is a stainless screw against stainless band serrations that slips under vibration. Unless of course your T doesn't vibrate!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 08:02 pm:

So far the only vibrations have been from the famous SoCal earthquakes. Of course when the motor starts there might be more than the earth shaking . . .

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 09:01 pm:

It's easy to install the hoses if you simply remove the water inlet from the block.

Push one hose onto the lower radiator outlet and slip on a two clamps. Tighten the lower clamp but leave the upper clamp loose.

Take the other hose and install and clamp it to the block inlet on one end and a loose clamp and the pipe in the other end. Take this assembly (inlet, clamps and pipe) and push the pipe into the lower radiator outlet hose. Finesse everything into place and bolt the inlet back onto the block.

Make any necessary adjustments and tighten the clamps as needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 09:49 pm:

To add to what Eric said, once every thing is is in place and tightned the next time you have to remove the radiator simply take the inlet and outlet loose and set the works off. KB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 08:03 am:

I have several NOS Ford Script inlet pipes, and they are indeed 12". I suggest you get the correct hose clamps too. They are only available from Snyders, and expensive too!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 10:02 am:

Paul:

Since your radiator is still dry - you might find it much easier to set the timing before you final install the radiator. You can see the front pin in the motor pulley which is then in full view and bending the new timer rod to get a position just past 3 o'clock position on the pin gives you exactly the timing you want. It is also then possible to get the hoses on that metal pipe of the radiator a bit easier since both ends are not in close proximity.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 11:03 am:

Do what Eric said, and also run a good bead of RTV around all six joints. Bolt the inlet and outlet castings back onto the block, adjust the stay rod, tighten the clamps, then let the RTV set up 24 hours. As Keith said, to R & R the radiator in the future, don't disturb the hoses; remove the castings from the block instead. This can be a tough place to seal, so once you've got it watertight, leave it alone.


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