Switching hubs

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Switching hubs
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Eaton on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 07:33 am:

Never done this before. Can I EASILY move a rear wheel hub to a front wheel. I have a good solid 21 inch front wheel however I need a good rear wheel. Can anyone give me any details on switching out the hubs or if this procedure is possibly ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 07:38 am:

I don't think they're interchangeable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 07:50 am:

You shouldn't have a problem, however, sometimes the hubs are really in the wheel tight, and you kind of have to walk them out one spoke at a time. First, get all the bolts out. If you are careful you can re-use them, but it takes care to do it. I use a putty knife, and sometimes you need a drift punch to rotate the flange if it is real tight. I also use a rawhide mallet to tap the spokes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren (Australia) on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 07:53 am:

Yes you can, all you are going to need is a set of new bolts and nuts for the hub, just make sure that you peen the threads flush onto the nuts inside the brake drum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Eaton on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 08:19 am:

Thanks. I have the new bolts. Will I need a press to get the old hubs out or will they come out willingly? Will the spokes fly around or stay where they are? I want to use the spoked wheel as it is without disassembly. Just a switch of hubs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Eaton on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 09:02 am:

Just a couple more questions so I don't have any unwanted surprises ( read below for questions) Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Eaton on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 09:05 am:

That should read, see above for questions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 11:17 am:

John,
If your wheel hubs are tight and they have steel felloes you can heat the felloe and create some play in the hub. By just heating the steel felloe about 100 degrees hotter then the wood spokes you can get about 20 thousandth of an inch of extra play in the wheel.

I just did that last winter to replace a rear wheel hub with a front wheel hub in a solid wheel. I took the hub bolts out and took the plate off the outside. Then supported the spokes near the hub with wood blocks. I beat on the hub some with a soft hammer with no success. So with the wheel temperature at about 40F I heated the felloe to about 140F with at heat gun being careful not the heat the wood spokes. Once the felloe was hot I easily tapped out the rear hub a installed front hub.

Also about the temperature differences, because of the different thermal coefficient of expansion of wood and steel, a steel felloe wheel that is tight at 30 degrees F will be loose and have about 10 thousands of play at 120 degrees. So by just picking a hot day without any extra heat applied to the felloe, you will be at an advantage.

Good luck,
Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Eaton on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 12:35 pm:

Thanks, I will try that. I have made 2 octagons out of 2X6 to support the wheel and I will try it out side in the sun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 02:10 pm:

Place hardwood blocks against the spokes, up close to and around the hub flange, (but not on the flange itself). This will support the spokes as you hit the hub nose with a rawhide mallet or with another chunk of hardwood driven by a sizeable hammer or with a press. You should be able to drive the hub out that way. Just a note, the hub plate, (the round plate that goes against the outside face of the spokes), is sometimes rusted very tight to the hub nose which can hamper removal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Eaton on Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 03:01 pm:

I removed the hub. I used the 2 concentric hexagons to support the wheel. The round plate came off after a couple of persuasive raps with a rubber mallet on the hub. Once the plate was off a few more raps drove the hub down into the smaller hex and the wheel was supported on the stand. Now to get the next wheel ready for its new hub. Thanks all for the help. More knowledge creates more confidence.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Friday, May 10, 2013 - 12:29 am:

John:

I always take a set of number punches and number each spoke before I take them out. That way I always get back in the right ORDER. I also use something round to press the spikes back onto a hub so they all go down at once.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration