Split ring mounting on TT rims

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Split ring mounting on TT rims
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Bender Tulsa Oklahoma on Friday, May 10, 2013 - 09:41 pm:

Is there any good way to put the split ring back on the rear rims of a TT truck?

I haven't spent a lot of time but what I thought would work isn't going well.

Another option would be finding a old time tire shop, they may still do them.

Thanks in advance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, May 10, 2013 - 09:51 pm:

Those are the ones that want to kill you if you let them. Some people wrap chains around them to keep them tame, but I took mine to the local tire shop where they work on a lot of trucks and tractors. They do the assembly in a steel cage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Friday, May 10, 2013 - 09:58 pm:

Mike,
You have to be very careful, folks have lost there heard working of split ring rims.

This thread may give you some ideas:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/338265.html?1359427749

And this write up may give you some ideas:

What should I know when disassembling split rim wheels?

Ensure that you are trained before working on a tire/rim assembly. Know, understand, and follow the proper safety procedures. Serious or fatal injuries can result if proper precautions are not followed.
Obtain mechanical lifting and moving devices for tires and wheels.
Follow manufacturers' assembly and disassembly procedures.
Check tire/rim assembly for proper component seating prior to removing it from the vehicle.
Stand to the side, out of the way of flying wheel parts, in case the assembly disassembles explosively.
Always deflate the tire before removing wheel nuts on any multi-piece tires that are to be removed from their hubs.
Deflate tires (both tires in a dual assembly) by first removing the valve core. Insert a wire in the valve stem to ensure that the stem is not blocked and that the tire is deflated completely before removing the rim/wheel from the axle.

Do not inflate any tire if:

it has been driven under-inflated by 80 percent or less of its recommended pressure, or
there is obvious or suspected damage to the tire or wheel components.

Such tires should always be deflated completely, removed from the vehicle, disassembled, and inspected. If the tire is in a dual assembly, check the air pressure in both tires with an air pressure gauge: an under-inflated tire may not otherwise be detected when the other tire is supporting the weight of the vehicle or trailer.

What are some tips for rim inspections?

Check that the proper tire size and construction matches the manufacturer's rim or wheel rating and size. The tire size must match the size of the rim. Rims or wheels may accommodate tires of various widths; check with the manufacturer's specifications.
Check rim parts against multi-piece rim/wheel matching chart.
Check all metal surfaces for rust, corrosion, cracks, bent flanges, sprung rings, and deep tool marks on rings or in gutter areas.
Clean and repaint lightly rusted rims. Remove all dirt and other foreign material from metal surfaces.
Use parts that are in good condition: destroy and dispose of parts that are corroded, bent, out-of-round, cracked or otherwise damaged.


When assembling split rims, what should I do?

Wear approved safety glasses.
Check tire for cracks, cuts and penetrating objects.
Ensure that removable rings are properly seated before inflating.
Use a suitable tire lubricant that is tended for use with rubber products and that will not promote the corrosion of the metal rims.
Place the tire in a safety cage large enough for tire expansion before inflating tire.
Inflate the tire using a clip-on air chuck and hose extension with an in-line pressure gauge and valve.
Use remote control inflation equipment.
Stand clear of the tire during inflation and ensure that no other person is in the trajectory path during inflation.
Inflate in incremental stages in steps of 70kPa (10psi). Check the rim after each stage to ensure correct seating.
Inflate the tire while the rim/wheel is on the vehicle, if the tire is under-inflated but has more than 80 percent of the recommended pressure.
Inspect the tire, rims, and rings for proper seating after the tire is fully inflated. If the tire is not well-seated, deflate the tire, inspect all parts, follow proper re-assembly and inflation procedures.
Remove the properly inflated tire from the restraining device.
Install the wheel of the vehicle correctly ensuring that the correct parts are used, that the nuts are tightened in the proper order, and that the recommended torque is applied.


What should I avoid doing?

Do not inflate tires on split rims that are not contained behind a safety cage or guard.
Do not stand in front of or over the rim during inflation.
Do not attempt to seat rings while tire is partially or totally inflated.
Do not re-inflate or add inflation pressure to a tire that has been run flat or is seriously under-inflated without removing and checking for ring seating and rim damage.
Do not use damaged, worn or corroded rims/wheels or mounting hardware.
Do not use an assembly with excessive side ring play, wide gaps between ring ends or butting ring ends unless specified by manufacturer.
Do not use a rim/wheel component you cannot identify.
Do not rework, weld, braze, or otherwise heat wheel components.
Do not hammer on components of an inflated or partially inflated assembly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Friday, May 10, 2013 - 11:57 pm:

I think the 32-34 Ford trucks used a continuous ring similar to that used on 16 inch 3/4 ton pickup wheels in the 40's and 50's. Any chance of finding a pair of these, they would be much safer.

Seventy years ago my dad repaired some tires on a decrepit truck, then handed the owner the air hose for him to inflate them.

Don't drink while you are working on these. A fellow I knew set out to fix two truck tires. He fixed one, then used his tools to pry the ring off what he thought was the second one. He was so drunk he couldn't tell one from the other and proceeded to pry the ring off the one he had just fixed and aired up. It banged him up pretty good and broke his arm in a couple of places, but he lived to tell me the tale.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Lovejoy, So Cal on Saturday, May 11, 2013 - 12:11 am:

I did mine in my driveway, they seemed in good shape. First few attempts, did not work - never done it before and did not know what I was doing. Just looked at it careful and tried again, they went on slick with no problems. The big tire irons I had were of no help, my motorcycle irons worked well. These post git me nervous,be careful and good luck. I would do mine again, no prob. I just got a ring started and with my hands pushed it around the rim, got about 2/3rds the way around and then had to use my tire irons,Good luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Bohannon on Saturday, May 11, 2013 - 09:55 am:

Are you sure you have a split "ring" and not just a split rim. What model year and size tires do you have. Yes they all can be dangerous but some for worse than others. Can you send pic. I have a 25 TT with split rims but not with a ring. Ring is far more dangerous.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Bender Tulsa Oklahoma on Saturday, May 11, 2013 - 10:25 am:

Yes split ring, lock ring or widow maker.
20" rims picture attached
Tim got email but not the PM, sometimes it takes a while and will check back later, looking forward to your information


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom on Saturday, May 11, 2013 - 01:03 pm:

As a kid in high school I worked at a Firestone store. We sold plenty of truck tires and I have done thousands. Inspect the ring and the groove to ensure there is nothing that prevents the ring from seating. Once the tire is in place, position the ring with the opening 180 out from the valve stem. Start the left side of the ring in the groove and walk the rest around with a hammer. If it looks seated, wrap the tire loosely with chain and put some airs in it. I read the previous warning against hitting the ring while putting air in but, light raps to force it in the groove may be needed but mostly not.

These rims aren't the ones I ever worried about. The rims that the inner and outer half engaged each other are the ones I was always Leary of.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, May 11, 2013 - 06:19 pm:

Whatever you do, make sure the lock ring and rim are mates. Don't use one brand of ring on a different brand of rim. They do not all interchange. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Saturday, May 11, 2013 - 11:42 pm:

The previous two posts pretty much tell it all.
I also have changed a bunch over the years and I'm still here.
BUT, the best thing to come along were tubeless truck tires.


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