I need to change my muffler on my 1923 touring and need help

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: I need to change my muffler on my 1923 touring and need help
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthony Ventrice on Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - 07:26 pm:

Hi I have a 1923 touring and the muffler is very loud and need to change the muffler, I want to order from Langs but need to know what to order and need some advice before I order and not get the wrong items so I can take to my mechanic to install. please any help is appreciated, thanks tony


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - 07:36 pm:

Wow, You have a mechanic to work on your Model T? Will you adopt me? :-)
PS- Look in the Model T encyclopedia on this forum under your Model T year and it will tell you what to use for 1923.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - 07:41 pm:

How's the exhaust pipe and manifold nut? Those and the muffler make up the entire exhaust system. Don't expect the muffler to sound like a modern car. The T muffler is nothing much more than a couple of cans with holes in each end. And don't let them put a clamp on the muffler to pipe connection. The system is fixed at each end and must be able to twist as the frame flexes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - 07:45 pm:

What's wrong with LOUD? Can't you hear your fingers tapping while you're texting? :-)

I use a cherry bomb and pieces of pipe from Autozoner. I love setting off car alarms in parking garages. . But that's just me.

---------
You must mainly make sure there are no leaks from the exhaust manifold to the muffler. A T can put out copious amounts of CO, unlike modren cars whose exhaust is almost pure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - 09:16 pm:

Give the guy a break.
Take your T to a local muffler shop. Have them replace the whole thing and have it over with.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - 09:27 pm:

Am I missing something here? Lang's catalog will tell you which muffler is correct for your car. The year ranges are right in the description.

If you can't figure that out, call Lang's, tell them what your car is, and they'll get you the right one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - 10:26 pm:

It could be that sometime in the past your exhaust system was replaced at the local muffler shop and is not stock. Lang's will have everything you need and those parts are not expensive. Are there some local T guys that could look at your car and advise you? If not post some pictures of what you have from the exhaust manifold to the tail pipe and and we can help you find the correct replacement parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 01:43 am:

Anthony, Here is a link to the correct items you will require. It is from Langs on line catalogue. As Ken said don't use the clamp shown in the link. Regards, John

http://www.modeltford.com/item/4025EXS.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 03:52 am:

If it's getting loud Anthony, just replace the bearing.

Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 04:32 am:

That bearing it too clean to have come out of that rusty muffler.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 07:43 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 08:26 am:

The real problem is that they had that bearing in there upside down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 10:27 am:

It it is an original muffler, why not rebuils it? The repros look similar, but are not the same.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 12:11 pm:

Anthony, Sometime loud exhaust sounds are not coming from the muffler. That brass packing nut holding the exhaust pipe to the manifold is often loose or fallen off the manifold. This can also cause the floorboards to catch fire.
The gaskets on the manifold to engine also often blow out and this also gets loud.
I never replaced a leak proof muffler and exhaust system because it was loud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve osborne on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 01:02 pm:

when I'm done with my restoration I think I'm going to put the original back on, which at first inspection I'm confident is the drain pipe off the bottom of a claw foot bathtub. I never heard it run but must have worked, a little #9 wire to hold it in place and I'll be right back where it was 60 years ago.

oz


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 01:33 pm:

The repro sheetmetal mufflers need to be tack welded together before you install them. Otherwise, the nut on the end comes loose or the stud for the nut becomes loose from the muffler and they fall apart as you drive down the road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Clipner-Los Angeles on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 07:25 pm:

If you get the steel ends one like I did, have a muffler shop weld the seams. Mine backfired and blew it out. My OJT with T's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Borland. Bathurst. NSW. Australia. on Thursday, May 16, 2013 - 02:29 am:

George,
Rebuilt my muffler on three occasions after backfires. it looks a bit out of shape but still works although it is now tack welded to keep it together as the metal has stretched after the rapid expansion and subsequent panel beating to restore it to a usable state.

Peter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, May 16, 2013 - 02:33 am:

I mostly fix original or make my own. Except for the nut.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Thursday, May 16, 2013 - 03:59 am:

I have had this muffler on our Fordor for over twenty-five years. It is stainless steel one that a friend and I put together. I have never had a problem with it coming apart. While it is not exactly as the original Canadian mufflers were made it is a close replica. The original mufflers had the exhaust pipe come from the manifold right through the muffler and the rear head was fastened with the bolt.



Here is the drawing for the first of the pressed steel 1921 Canadian mufflers. ( Most of our Australian Model T's came from Ford Canada ).
Note that it has a cotter pin holding the front muffler head.



Sometime later in production they rolled a bead into the exhaust pipe to secure the front muffler head.

This is the drawing for January 1926.



Anyone who has seen an original muffler will be familiar with how the rear muffler head was fastened. I have tried to replicate it with my muffler.

Best regards, John Page





The Canadian mufflers differed from the U.S. , having a deflector on the rear muffler head, and the exhaust exited at the bottom of the rear head.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Thursday, May 16, 2013 - 10:43 am:

John: That is great! It is always a pleasure to see good workmanship. Is it possible for whoever did that work for you to make the correct exhaust pipe from the manifold to the end? I've always been able to find good used exhaust pipes at swap meets, but that's getting hard to do anymore. I have all the Ford prints for it, and even have a NOS exhaust pipe, with the Ford script every 18".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom on Thursday, May 16, 2013 - 10:50 am:

Read the advice of Richard Wolf above. I bought a touring car from him and whoever did the exhaust did a fantastic job. It is larger diameter pipe that was expanded to go over the threads on the manifold and clamp in place rather than that danged nut.

If the guy that made that pipe had saved the settings for the bending machine and could replicate it and sell tons of them. Its a work of art.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Clipner-Los Angeles on Friday, May 17, 2013 - 12:10 am:

G'Day Peter, I don't have a shop in the apartment to reform sheet metal, I tried and just couldn't get it to work, but I have spare parts.
George n L.A.


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