Non-Ford big early car-Photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Non-Ford big early car-Photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 01:09 am:


Look how tall that car is with the top folded!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 01:27 am:

Franklin. About '06. I think.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 01:35 am:

The full elliptic suspension says it's Franklin. Here's another barrel hood Franklin, probably a six.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 07:05 am:

The curved firewall makes me think possibly a1905 or 1906 National.

1905 National:



1906 National:



1905 Franklin:



1906 Franklin:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 07:18 am:

I don't see the double wishbone on your Nationals, Rob.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 08:18 am:

Ralph,

It doesn't seem like any are a "perfect fit". The fenders are wrong for the 1905 National. The rear door opens rearward, unlike the 1906 Franklin.

The battery/tool box appears longer, as on the National. Maybe a different model or mid year. I didn't/don't see the double wishbone? If you mean the front springs, they do look more like the Franklin full eliptical.

I would certainly take any of them :-)

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Richardson on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 11:39 am:

The car is likely a 1907 Franklin Model D, their mid-sized 20 hp touring car. The barrel hood and full elliptics are giveaways as is the dipped tubular front axle. The round dash is characteristic of 06-7 cars. Square side lamps were used later with a squared off dash, so I do not know what is going on there. The large front lamps are post 1906.

Rick's photo is a 1910 Model G, the last year of the barrel-hoods; it is 4 cylinder and noted for having concentric valves.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 12:00 pm:

What are concentric valves? That's a term I haven't heard before.

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 12:57 pm:

Paul,
This is one type of concentric valves
1910 Franklin cylinder head


This was apparently a gas (not gasoline) Crossly engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 01:20 pm:

"Double wishbones" I wake up before breakfast most mornings...

Chuck hit it right. What years Franklins do you have, Chuck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Richardson on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 02:23 pm:

1906 Type G and 1917 Series 9A.
1906 G
1917 Series 9A


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 03:20 pm:

It looks as if this 07 Franklin has the rounded firewall. The 05 and 06 Franklins I posted above did not. Looks like it is the 07 (this one has the rounded firewall) Franklin.

There was a gray Franklin touring on New London to New Brighton tour a few times, great looking and running car.

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 03:43 pm:

Thanks Jim, concentric valves are new to me. How well did they work? Were they troublesome to maintain or expensive to produce compared to ordinary poppet valves?

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 03:51 pm:

The first Franklin, 1902, had a spherical combustion chamber. You thought the Hemi was a new idea? That drives a need for concentric valves, but I'm not sure the 1902 had them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 04:14 pm:

I agree with Chuck Richardson. It's a 1907 Franklin Model D.

Below are photos of a 1907 Franklin Model D that I took at the AACA 75th Anniversary National Meet in Louisville, KY on July 4, 2010. I forget the name of the fellow that owns it.

To Rob Heyen: Tom Rasmussen in the Twin Cities also owns a 1907 Franklin Model D touring. He has run it in the New London to New Brighton run on a couple occasions. You may have seen it in the past.

1

2

3


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 04:34 pm:

This is Tom at the controls of a 1905 in Bakersfield:



Jeff Hasslen, another Franklin expert from Minn, is the Tatra man. Gene Carrothers is on the right, resting after cranking awhile on the engine's first start after many years. The car now has HT magneto.

Tom wrote a great article on motor oils for the "Franklin Service Station" about a dozen years ago. I lost track of it, however.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 08:50 pm:

I saw an '04 Franklin like that with the sidewinder engine.
It had an oil light that stayed on when it had oil pressure and went off if it lost pressure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 11:34 pm:

The Austin Mini is widely hailed as revolutionary for its crosswise four. Mini was only 60 years behind the times.

The crosswise aircooled Franklin had no fan, just forward motion for cooling. Hmm, the ol' brass picup has no fan, and depends on forward motion for cooling - after the water gets hot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Richardson on Wednesday, May 22, 2013 - 12:34 pm:

The Franklin concentric valves worked well, but were expensive to manufacture, were fussy to maintain and did not add that much to the performance of the car. Not to get to far from Ford here, but, Franklin from 1902-1924 was an engineer driven company. They had aluminum bodies and wood frames, so were light, easy to handle and rode like dreams. Style-wise, they are an acquired taste.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil on Wednesday, May 22, 2013 - 04:03 pm:

I have always found that Renault style hood very attractive.

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Wednesday, May 22, 2013 - 04:32 pm:

It was the horse collar hood front, 1922-4, that made for jokes.


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