Question on rust

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Question on rust
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Green on Tuesday, May 28, 2013 - 10:58 am:

Does anyone know of a good way to separate the wood frame in the doors to treat severe surface rust on the interior side of the doors behind the wood? The wood is in good shape just don't want to break it removing it. Or is there some thing that can be used to treat it with out removing the wood? Thanks, Robert


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bernard Paulsen, San Buenaventura, Calif on Tuesday, May 28, 2013 - 03:36 pm:

Order Fertan from Fertan USA. Buy a $2.99 spray bottle. Spray it in there, let sit for 24 hours. Hose out with water. Repeat at least one more time, better two. The spray a good rust primer in (or let run down), cover with paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis E. Towle on Tuesday, May 28, 2013 - 04:44 pm:

After you get the rust gone, use zinc chroma primer, it will NEVER RUST AGAIN. Check napa, or auto paint stores, it is an acid etch, and if you get it in a non spray can pour it in and let it drip out...


Travis
Topeka, Kansas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Wednesday, May 29, 2013 - 06:29 pm:

The easiest most effective and cheapest way to treat the surface rust without removing your wood, is to liberally paint inside the door with used motor oil. This will seep into areas where nothing else will. I do this to all the bodies of the cars I restore. This is also very effective on the later cars with spot welded panels. I do this first thing when I buy a new vehicle. I live in the rust belt and never have a rusty vehicle. You want to do this after you paint the car, if you do it before you want to do a very through prep job before you paint. the oil will seep out for awhile, depending on how much you apply. As an added benefit it will help water proof the wood.
I have a 66 Ford F-350 Tow Truck. I used this truck commercially in the 60's and 70's for my collision business, and did this to it every couple years. I still own this truck and to this day, there is no rust.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, May 29, 2013 - 09:44 pm:

Synthetic, or not? What weight? Detergent, or non-detergent?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Wednesday, May 29, 2013 - 10:23 pm:

Steve, I didn't want to start a controversy on the correct type of oil, so I'll make it very general: I never tried synthetic, so I will add a big question mark on it.
I've used anything that comes out of the crank case, as used oil works bette. It hangs better because of the crud in it. Envision an oil spot on your garage floor, and how it looks when the water beads up on it. That's the protection you're getting


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Thursday, May 30, 2013 - 01:10 am:

Dan,
Good idea on treating seams with oil. For the amount of oil needed there may be a benefit to use new oil. Also I have heard and it makes sense that non-detergent oil is better for rust prevention then detergent oil. Detergent oil is supposed to adsorb moisture and dirt.
Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Thursday, May 30, 2013 - 07:18 am:

Jim, There is no benefit to using new oil. The crud that is in the used oil helps hold it there. I've tried it both ways and the used oil works best. I've only used old detergent oil. I've never had a problem with it holding moisture. You want it to absorb the dirt, as that helps hold the oil where you want it and helps to keep it from washing away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, May 30, 2013 - 10:52 am:

How does your car smell?
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Thursday, May 30, 2013 - 07:41 pm:

Norm, Like a Model T!
Seriously, it doesn't leave a smell. On later cars that I have had to get underneath to spray the oil, if it gets on the exhaust system, it will smell and smoke until it burns off. Usually burns off in 30 miles, and no smell afterwords.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Rivard on Thursday, May 30, 2013 - 08:01 pm:

A word of warning. If you are in the process of a restoration on your T and have any of the body down to bare metal DO NOT do the oil treatment until you have painted all the parts with epoxy primer. If any of the oil leaks through seams or you touch the bare metal with oily hands you will have a hard time getting the paint to ever stick. It you get oil on the epoxy primer you can clean it up and sand the primer off. Good Luck\Don


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