Old Photo - Model T Era 1914 Excelsior Motorcycle Motordrome Racer

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Old Photo - Model T Era 1914 Excelsior Motorcycle Motordrome Racer
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, June 09, 2013 - 11:51 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hugh N. Coltharp on Monday, June 10, 2013 - 12:50 am:

Please note the lack of a drive chain


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson on Monday, June 10, 2013 - 06:58 am:

Board tack racing, when men were men.

Happy motoring, Warren


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Monday, June 10, 2013 - 08:51 am:

Wonder how much lumber was used for a track and how long they lasted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Monday, June 10, 2013 - 09:14 am:

Most of the board track racers did not have a clutch or gearbox, they were pushed or pulled to get them started and the race was started with a rolling start after a lap.
The chain was no doubt removed to ease moving the bike around for photographs.
Replacing the 2X4 boards so often was one of the reasons board tracks were abandoned, that and a bad accident.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Monday, June 10, 2013 - 02:53 pm:

That looks like Charles Lindbergh.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, June 11, 2013 - 02:52 am:

Lindbergh was born in 1902 and would have been a bit young to drive during the board racing heydays before the US entry in WW1. He did drive a 1920 Excelcior "X" twin, though, bought at Martin Engstrom's hardware store in Little Falls, MN in 1919. He kept it until 1943 & donated it to the Henry Ford museum.

Here's a young Lindbergh on his bike besides an unknown Ford speedster:

Lindy X


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