Old Photo - Cheaper By The Dozen

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Old Photo - Cheaper By The Dozen
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, June 21, 2013 - 11:01 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, June 22, 2013 - 12:47 am:

Hard to imagine running a Model T with that many passengers in it. When I have two other people in my Tin Lizzie, it feels like I'm dragging a pine tree. I wonder what it was like to fill every seat and tackle some hills.

Of course, the big cars could do it much better, if not with ease. I remember reading about "Foolish Carriage," the 1914 Pierce-Arrow in the famous book, back when I was in 5th Grade. It helped cement my fascination with Brass-Era cars. "Foolish Carriage" transported two adults, two babies and ten kids. Whew!

The illustration of the car on the cover of the book looked a little different than that in the photo of the actual Gilbreth family.

.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, June 22, 2013 - 12:56 am:

Wow Bob, That's and awful lot of bladders to have to stop the car for!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, June 22, 2013 - 07:56 am:

With a 66 HP Pierce (looks to be about 1917) you can fit a lot of folks in the back. Wonder if the car still exists?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, June 22, 2013 - 11:40 am:

Royce,

According to the book, "Foolish Carriage" was sold after Frank Gilbreth passed away. If I remember correctly, the car had to be towed away because Mr. Gilbreth was the only man who knew how to start it.

The book itself is absolutely adorable, enjoyable and wholesome as milk and cookies. I suspect "Foolish Carriage" was a 1914 Touring, based on something I found in a book by Henry Austin Clark ("Antique Cars"a pdf copy of which I'll gladly send you if you'll e-mail me). This is the photo and caption:



On the other hand, this photo of a 1917 Pierce Arrow doesn't look much different, so you may be spot-on about the vintage:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, June 22, 2013 - 11:47 am:

Henry Austin Clark was one of the foremost authorities on brass cars, and Pierce Arrows in particular. HAC even spent time with Henry Ford at the Greenfield Village museum in the 1930's. He single handedly saved many brass era cars from the scrap yard before WWII. An amazing writer, and an amazing man.

If Henry Austin Clark said that I would have to believe he was right.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Dysart - SoCal on Saturday, June 22, 2013 - 12:10 pm:

It looks like one difference between the '14 and the '17 in the photos is the '14 has a "two-man style" top and the '17 has a "one-man style" top without the middle irons and bow. Looking at the picture with the family, there is a bar coming off of the back of the front seat that could be a top mount. So I agree with Royce and HAC, the car was probably a '14.

Have fun and keep cranking.
Eric


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way, Wa. on Saturday, June 22, 2013 - 12:19 pm:

We know what his night job was,but I wonder what
his day job/work was.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, June 22, 2013 - 12:30 pm:

Bob,

Frank Gilbreth was a rather wealthy (obviously) and influential man. He made his living as a motion-study expert. You can read about him here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Bunker_Gilbreth,_Sr.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration