Wow this is nice - 1913 Touring at Hemmings online

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Wow this is nice - 1913 Touring at Hemmings online
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 08:00 am:

Price is very fair for all the work and it looks ready to go anywhere!


http://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/carsforsale/ford/model_t/1580936.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 08:07 am:

Sure looks pretty !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 08:07 am:

For $22,500 ??? ...and a later carb with a filter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 09:19 am:

It would be very difficult to build that for less than 22k. Unless you have the bodywork skills, engine building skills, or upholstery skills needed for this quality. Most guys do not. Somebody will be very happy to own this I think.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 09:24 am:

Sure has a lot of wrong stuff on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 09:32 am:

Bet it doesn't have pipe plug freeze plugs either. But the full leather upholstery sounds great and you could sell those cowl lamps for $1.5K and buy a correct set for half that amount.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine in Melbourne, Australia on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 09:53 am:

Fully correct #2 condition 1913 Ts sell for around $30K at auction.

If the seller takes $20K for this car I agree it's a good buy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 10:01 am:

The pipe plugs are there. You can see them if you blow up the engine photo. Nevertheless, while it is very pretty to look at, there are a lot of pricy items you would need to change if you wanted to make it correct.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 12:24 pm:

Correct or not, there are a lot of nice accessories on that car. Wonder what make of auxiliary transmission it has? Also seems unusual to me to see the truss on the rear end. Probably not the car for a "purist", however, still all Model "T" and a very nice car! Would be very nice show car as well as a really nice "driver", especially for parades with that auxiliary transmission!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 12:28 pm:

Ahhh,....Warford! Got so excited by the nice photos that I didn't read the "description carefully enough!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bernard Paulsen, San Buenaventura, Calif on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 05:44 pm:

Too pretty, too sterile. Every last bit of soul the car once had has been restored out of it. For $20K, I would have bought this also-not-100% correct '13:



Or, even this one, for a bit less money:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 08:29 pm:

I like that phrase.... "Every last bit of soul the car once had has been restored out of it..." I'm with you Bernard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 09:07 pm:

For what it's worth, a newbie's humble opinion:
Patina has to be congruous. Folks, there are unwritten rules! Well, actually, the rules are written down——it's just that most car guys don't know where to go to read them. They're in an odd place. Odd, because the rule book was written by people who create an imitation of what's real; an illusion. I'm talking scale model builders.

These guys know all there is to know on the subject of "weathering." Look in any model-making magazine and you'll read entire articles on the subject. Some modeling subjects get a lot of weathering, some get a little or none. Military aircraft models get plenty of paint chips, powder burns and exhaust soot. Scale model cars get a much more subtle treatment:

In the case of a scale model of any car manufactured after 1949, it'll look like a freshly minted penny. For intentional effect, a subtle amount of wear is grudgingly allowed on the interior. But absolutely no rips in the fabric. Period.

Pre-war scale models are allowed a little more flexibility in the aging department. Why? Because that's how we remember the cars. The median age of most automobile enthusiasts today is well beyond that of the Clearasil crowd and as toddlers and children, we baby-boomers were old enough to have ridden in a few pre-war cars, but at that point in time, such vehicles were pretty much on their last legs and one major repair bill away from the junk yard. In our memories, they're allowed to be a little beat-up. It's a nostalgia thing.

But there's a tangible divide between the age of nostalgia and the age of pure, unadulterated history. People are fascinated by a brass or steel-era Model T Ford, but few will get pangs of nostalgia over the Tin Lizzie because few survive who will have memories of her——and of those who do, most won't be in good enough shape to attend a car show. Oh, there are exceptions, but they're kinda rare.

Once car-show spectators go back along the time-line to the pre-Prohibition era, their view takes on an historical objectivity. Rather than exclaiming, "Yeah, I remember that!", they think to ourselves, "So that's how people lived, back then. Hmm." That point of view invites weathering and patina because in the historical context, it feels right. When we clasp our hands behind our backs and stick our heads inside something that old, we're looking for history, and the wear and tear of what we see in there gives us a feel for the vast expanse between the present and an unfamiliar past. It's a detached reverence you don't get from big fins, fuzzy dice and chrome-skull gearshift knobs. At that point, anything from a Beverly-Hillbillies Oldsmobile truck to a pristinely restored, trailer-queen Stutz-Bearcat looks right.

While we all appreciate the aged and mellowed appearance of patina on a genuine barn-find, you can't argue with the breath-taking magnificence of something like this fully restored 1911 Pierce Arrow Model 48.



Obviously, it's not a "driver." You can't really take this toy out and play with it because that would begin the process of unraveling the restoration. But oh, the drool-factor!

Unfortunately, scale car-modeling is no longer what it used to be. Back when I was a kid, all males were born knowing how to drive and the lines of their right palms were an H-shift pattern. Every single one of us assembled car models and we all knew who “The Kat from AMT” was. Alas, airplane glue and Testor’s paints seem to have gone the way of the Dodo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 10:29 pm:

I'll take the shiny one ...and drive the wheels off it. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 11:48 pm:

Bob - As always, you make some very good points, however, for what it's worth (and, from a "pre-baby boomer") model railroaders are the true masters of "weathering"! And a really good model railroader has weathered some antique automobiles as well as RR rolling stock, bridges and buildings and such!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, July 01, 2013 - 11:53 pm:

Actually, you got me to thinking Bob; that's gonna' be my answer from now on about the appearance of two of my three Model "T's. The "23 roadster, and especially the '23 touring, that I've been telling everyone that "Ma & Pa Kettle wouldn't want to be seen in, look like they do because they are perfect examples of 90 years of "weathering"! Ha,ha,....harold


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