Only two pedals

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Only two pedals
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By marvin turner on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 08:55 am:

Anyone ever see a conversion where the brake is connected by linkage to the high low pedal eliminating the brake pedal? The rear brakes are also connected to the high low pedal


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 09:04 am:

How would that work?????


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By marvin turner on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 09:13 am:

That is what i am trying to find out.I posted a pic on the ford barn but cant seem to post it here as it sais the pic is too big. Thanks Marv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 09:35 am:

Is this an aftermarket product or conversion made during the T's heyday?
Maybe someones backyard invention? ???????


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 10:35 am:

Marvin,

From your profile page this is your first posting on the MTFCA forum Ė so WELCOME ABOARD! And let us know if you prefer Marv or Marvin etc.

I am reposting your post from the Ford Barn site [located at: http://www.fordbarn.com/forum/showthread.php?p=683372#post683372 ] to make it easier for folks to answer your question. From Marvinís posting:

I have what i believe to be a 1926 coupe that i recently purchased. It has only two foot pedals? plus foot throttle, On the transmission where the brake pedal would be there is a short arm that has a linkage that hooks to a ear on the high low pedal . Anybody ever seen this? The rear brakes are also connected to the high low pedal .



The engine also has v-belt pulleys. Thanks Marv



+++++++++++++++++ Hap again +++++++++++

A few more photos of how it is hooked up would be helpful. Especially to see if the parts look like they were produced in a factory or blacksmith/backyard. In some cases it can be hard to tell if they used off the shelf parts and made the rods to the correct lengths.

Posting photos is easy once you learn the trick. Sort of like remembering to turn the gas on helps to make starting the T much easier. For suggestions on posting photos please see:

This one sounds easy: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/239351.html

Some additional choices:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/223627.html

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/216043.html

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/237500.html

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/222068.html

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/235391.html

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/209570.html

Also shoot for 190kb or less even though it says 200kb or less.

If you have a couple of other photos of the set up Ė if you e-mail them to me, I will try to post them for you. If you click on my name it brings up my profile and my e-mail address is the third line down.

Iíll look through some of my accessory files and see if I run across one or not. There were many accessories that were produced locally in a small area that never really were advertised much. A classic one of those is the Model T Ford V-8 engine that a California dealer produced. I have seen photos of a surviving engine but I do not recall seeing it advertised in any magazines such as Ford Owner etc. Although there are more early advertisements to look at than I will ever be able to see them all.

You didnít mention if this is your first T or not. If it is, please let us know as we have some standard safety etc. items we like to share with new owners. You can discover them all on your own but it is less expensive to read about some of them and avoid them. Also if this is your first T you may want to confirm it is a 1926 Coupe and not a different year Coupe with a 1926 engine installed (they were often swapped out over the years and still swapped today).

Again welcome to the forum and if appropriate to the Model T Hobby.

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 11:02 am:

Does the car have an auxiliary transmission? And is there a low band in the Ford transmission?
I don't understand how this system could work if the Ford transmission is still working as Henry built it. Without the low band, you could use the pedal for a clutch, and then when you push all the way down, it would be a brake. However, you would lose the ability to slow down in gear while you apply the brake.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By marvin turner on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 03:19 pm:

First Thank you Hap for posting the pics and links and also the welcome. This is my first t.
I bought it from a old garage where it has rested since 1949. It was being restored in about 1970 or so(got that date from some parts boxes that had come through the mail). I had some time to check things out a bit And the left rear wheel brake is hooked up to a ear that has been welded to the high low pedal. The right rear brake is hooked up to the hand lever. I took the cover off the transmission and there is only one band and it is on the very rear drum! There is a auxillery transmission that the lever is stuck in neutral so i have no idea as if there would be reverse in that. See if this pic shows up or not. Thanks for the help on this Marv Turner


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 05:33 pm:

must be using the hand brake as clutch to start moving and not using the low at all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 06:59 pm:

I imagine that who ever did that realized the car cannot be driven that way, so the experiment was concluded.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 07:21 pm:

Why Royce? with an auxiliary box it should work, how long the clutch lasts is another story, sure looks like a lot of oil dirt build up around the peddles to have been working.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 07:39 pm:

Could the set up possibly be for someone disabled that only had the use of one foot?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 09:37 pm:

So, the left peddle is a clutch and if you push it more it is a transmission band and left wheel brake. The hand brake is a clutch and right rear wheel brake. With reverse and low in the auxiliary box it should work fine. May be a little hard to get equal braking to the rear wheels.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 09:38 pm:

I had an original accessory called a Comford or Comeford or something like that and it allowed the clutch pedal to hold the brake pedal down for starting on a hill.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 09:53 pm:

As there is only one band in the trans, all the left peddle is doing is operating the brakes, trans and rear, clutch by hand brake lever.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 10:03 pm:

Kerry,
It is hard to see but it looks like the clutch linkage is connected from the left peddle.

Without the bands, the reverse peddle does nothing. It is essentially a one peddle Model T.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 10:28 pm:

Yep, agree, looks that way Jim, a lot of dirt! but I still think it would work as long as the original clutch pack held out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By marvin turner on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 11:06 pm:

So now i guess i pull the engine and start looking for the missing parts.Would parts for the transmission fit from a 1919 that i have?
The motor no in the 26 is 11771562
Thanks Marv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 11:52 pm:

Marv,
Welcome. Are you not going to try to hear it run before tearing it apart? Sounds like the last guy was trying to do something out of the ordinary. On one of my speedsters, the left pedal is just a clutch for the Ruckstel and Muncie. Also, the reverse pedal is bent over under the brake so that both are actuated when you mash on the brake pedal. To back up, you use the reverse in the Muncie. It also has a foot feed for the gas, so, it functions sort of like a modern car--clutch, brake, and gas. Is your motor seized? I'd put the rear up on jack stands and turn it over with the crank and see what moves and what noises it makes. I'd play with it and decide if I wanted to continue to try to make it run. It may surprise you-- the other guy might have went through the motor already. All the stuff you showed in the pics looked like it was done intentionally, so, there are probably not missing parts down inside! With it jacked up and the engine running, you could mash pedals and pull levers and see what happens! What kind of aux trans do you have? It may just be stiff from 65 years of sitting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Sunday, July 07, 2013 - 12:14 am:

Marv,
Back when that T was last messed with, there was no internet, ebay, or craigslist. Vendors were few and far between. The one I used in the 70's had a couple of typed pages for his "catalog". New radiators were probably not as readily available or affordable as today, so, it was very common to put waterpumps on the cars. The V pullies would lead me to believe that the guy had some machining ability or knew someone who did. All of his engineering ideas may not work, but, I'd bet he didn't attempt them on a bad transmission or motor. You may not be as bad off as you think! Good luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By marvin turner on Sunday, July 07, 2013 - 09:42 am:

Mike,
I plan to try to start the engine. The aux transmission shift lever is stuck in neutral. A spare aux came with the car too so i have to wonder what i will find there. The timer is off the car and most parts are gone.
I have an old t running gear that i bought back when i got out of high school (1977) that has been a shed since then. I believe it is a 1919.
I had it running years ago so i have parts i can borrow i guess.
Marv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Monday, July 08, 2013 - 11:36 am:

I'd almost suspect that this was used as some sort of auxilliary power for perhaps a saw, or other device...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eddy Lee Emerson on Monday, July 08, 2013 - 04:46 pm:

My friend, who has a 1913 REO, says that his Reo works the same way. Pushing the left pedal half way down disengages the clutch. Pushing the pedal further down applies the brakes. Ed


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