Shock absorber decal

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Shock absorber decal
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 01:48 pm:

Did the Ford shocks have the Burd decal on them?

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 03:44 pm:

There were no shocks on a Model T. Any shocks were an added accessory, so that name could have been on one of the after market shocks sold for Model T's.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 04:09 pm:

Norm, check out this thread.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/211924.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Robison on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 04:16 pm:

Norm, On the improved cars shocks were a dealer authorized accessories just like the Duolight tail lamp. So, yes Model T's did come with shocks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Robison on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 04:34 pm:



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 07:28 pm:

"3208SX ... Snubbing units (front and rear) all cars except T.C."

I expect the T.C. stands for Town Car, not Touring Car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 07:34 pm:

I was always under the impression that the passengers were supposed to be the shock absorber's . :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 08:20 pm:

Mike,

Nope. T.C. stands for touring car. There wasn't an improved town car. This is made clear in the Ford Service Bulletins installation instructions, which unfortunately were not considered "essential" in the published book from the service bulletins.

Near as I can tell, there was a version of the touring car body in which the back-seat storage area was deepened, and this made necessary a mod to the rear shock mounting bracket.

This is the first example I have seen with a Burd-Gilman decal. Those sold by Ford had Burd-Gilman stamped onto the barrel, with a larger Ford raised on the same surface. This one may be a Burd-Gilman after-market accessory, from which Ford chose. If so, it has a lighter, flimsier mounting structure. The Ford mounts, fore and aft, appear to be forged.

In the mounting instructions, these things are referred to only as "shock absorbers," and not snubbers.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 09:28 pm:

Thanks James, I had a feeling that you could shed some light onto this. These Burd shocks with the decal are pretty much identical to the Ford shocks, except for the brackets and the "Ford" script stamping. I still wonder if a NOS Ford shock might not have had a decal on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 09:41 pm:

Part number 45068X "Bottom Tool Box" would have been on all 26-27 Touring Cars. What's not noted in the parts list or diagrams is WHERE the box is mounted. Perhaps it is behind the rear spring clearance hump. That would interfere with the mounting of the snubber.

Someone with a 26-27 Touring needs to look. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 10:03 pm:

A quick search on Google Books indicates that Burd Gilman shock absorbers appeared as an aftermarket accessory around 1923. Unfortunately, with limited views I couldn't pull enough information to see if they were designed strictly for Fords or if they could be used with other makes.

http://www.google.com/search?q=%22burd+gilman%22&btnG=Search+Books&tbm=bks&tbo=1

Also, there was a brochure recently on eBay:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ford-1924-1925-Burd-Gilman-Shock-Absorber-Brochure-/3803 92462766?nma=true&si=O82uaRX39ITSWGE8vZVFC%252BHOB0U%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_ trksid=p2047675.l2557


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, Mostly in Dearborn on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 10:13 pm:

Ken,

Looking at the parts lists, I see several references to Tool Box Bottom even as far back as 1915. I believe it refers to the flat floor under the rear seat.

On my 26 touring body, the crossmember hump is substantially higher than my Fordor. This leads me to believe the floor under the seat sits much lower where it would interfere with any shock installation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 - 11:23 pm:

This appears to be the patent . . .

No indication in the patent as to a make of automobile
the inventor may have had in mind, and drawings do
not cover any mounting brackets.

E. L. Leinbach
Chicago, Illinois
Assignor to George F. Gilman
Chicago, Illinois
Shock Absorber
Patent number: 1498284
Filing date: Mar 10, 1919
Issue date: Jun 17, 1924
http://tinyurl.com/jwapgcu

Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Thursday, July 18, 2013 - 12:44 am:

So the stop light gets mounted on the transmission ears and connects to the magneto post?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Thursday, July 18, 2013 - 01:01 am:

Kep, we are talking about shocks! :-) I wonder how much you have to pay the guy with the screwdriver to ride along and pull on the shock cable. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Thursday, July 18, 2013 - 02:10 am:

You run the shock cable under the floor so you can reach it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Thursday, July 18, 2013 - 09:00 am:

Tom,

The Burd-Gilman logo was lightly stamped on the back of the unit, and it was unlikely to be seen by anyone except the mechanic who installed it at the dealer. See the attached photo.

Another mod that Ford insisted on was flame retardant on the cotton bands. (Two per shock.) Unfortunately, this chemical turned out to be an excellent adhesive. Driving out of the dealership, if the customer were to exercise the brand new shocks on a rough patch of road, they would heat up. After he parked his shiny new Ford, the owners shock drums would be bonded to the cotton bands by way of the hot, flowing flame retardant.

The next time he drove, on the first bump the driver would be bounced out of his seat as the rigidly locked shock absorber failed to snub the recoil. Something had to give, and it was always the mounting bracket on the back and the axle connection point on the front. Most Ford shocks were disposed of soon after purchase.

All of the Ford shocks I have examined are either NOS or lightly used, with the back bracket bent or the axle connection missing. Sitting on a shelf for years, the bands would eventually bond firmly to the drums.

Jim

JimBurd-Gilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, July 18, 2013 - 09:05 am:

James, Very informative, I enjoyed your contributions here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Thursday, July 18, 2013 - 10:50 am:

Can Ford shocks be repaired to be usable?

I have never seen the rear axle attachment for the cable. Does anyone have one that they can post a picture of?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Thursday, July 18, 2013 - 11:41 am:

Tom,

The pictures show the rear axle cable attachment, forged steel, unrestored.

Yes, they can certainly be restored. Construction is robust, and the bonded cotton bands prevented rust on the drum. The spring is heavily endowed with graphited grease.

Jim

Jim155-5578_IMG.JPG 155-5579_IMG.JPG


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Thursday, July 18, 2013 - 12:33 pm:

Thanks James. The bracket is permanently on the cable. That is problematic. The part looks cast to me though, not forged. Are you sure it is forged?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Wetherbee on Thursday, July 18, 2013 - 12:58 pm:

Here are pictures of the front clamp - these seem harder to find as they were not permanently attached to the shock.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Thursday, July 18, 2013 - 03:07 pm:

Tom,

I'm not sure that the connection is forged, but I am sure it's not cast iron. It could well be cast steel, and I often cannot tell the difference. Now that you mention it, it does not appear to be an easily forged shape.

The cable, which is quite stout, appears to be silver-soldered or brazed in place. The front has a steel hemisphere similarly attached to the cable end, and it is free to flex in the hemispherical depression in the front bracket, as is shown n Mark's photo.

I have found few examples in which the cable was broken. These seem to be cases in which the drum froze on the rear-mounted shock, but the owner was too preoccupied to remove the shock absorber, and eventually the axle movement tore it loose.

Mark,

Those front axle attachments are indeed rare. A couple of stiff jerks with a frozen drum would pull it clean off the axle, and it was free to separate from the cable. I borrowed a NOS example and had a couple of units replicated by a local blacksmith.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Thursday, July 18, 2013 - 03:16 pm:

I have a front attachment or two, and I could make more if I wanted, but I have no rear attachment and indeed have never seen one in real life that I can remember. Anyone have an extra rear that they don't need?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Wetherbee on Friday, July 19, 2013 - 12:25 pm:

My rear shock is still in the car - the front had a frayed cable and the adjusting screw was nearly worn in half with the vibrations, so it's been out for a while trying to figure out what to do with it.

There was someone looking for a bracket a few years back and I'd taken the pictures with the scales so he could try to make one - never heard how he made out, but that is how this forum goes sometimes - a great place to share info here and it can be quite a good resource!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, July 20, 2013 - 09:25 am:

I have an NOS front shock at home. Missing the brackets. No decals. Just painted black. Look like James' picture.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Danuser on Saturday, July 20, 2013 - 09:49 am:

Tom I believe I have a rear mount on a chassis here at the farm, I'll check when its a little cooler, as I've just been home 5 days from a nother hospital round danuser88@ktis.net


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