Gas line Leak

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Gas line Leak
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael sharkey on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 01:34 pm:

Ever since I changed out my carb . I have been having major leakage in my gas line . I used Teflon tape on all the elbows and joints that go into the carb but it still leaks . I figured out that it doesn't leak from the valve back . But from the valve to the carb it leaks . I can't exactly figure out where the leak is .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 01:53 pm:

Many times folks have posted here that white Teflon tape is not gasoline-resistant. You need Yellow Teflon tape. That is not as easily found as white, and Permatex #2 is a good substitute. There are other sealers available at auto parts stores -- just make sure it says gasoline- and alcohol- resistant on the label. Remember, current gasoline contains alcohol!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 01:53 pm:

Regular white teflon tape gets eaten by gasoline. You have to get the yellow teflon tape for use with gas. Take the elbow off the carb and clean all of the white teflon off, then re-tape all the threads with yellow teflon. You should be good to go after that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 01:54 pm:

Peter beat me to it. I didn't have any trouble getting the yellow teflon at my local hardware store.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 02:08 pm:

Yes yellow teflon's a must but try to find the leak before disassembling the plumbing. Dry everything and check around the tapered shaft. Put your finger on the spring below the shaft and check for wetness. Your looking for a possible cracked fitting or carb housing too. Repeatedly taking it apart's no fun especially if it solves nothing. Best shot a yellow teflon is an auto supply store.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT BERGSTADT on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 02:55 pm:

Check to see if you cracked the carb, where the elbow threads in, Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael sharkey on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 03:02 pm:

Thanks guys . Ill try to find yellow Teflon tape


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael sharkey on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 03:04 pm:

Ill check bob but I don't think I tightened it down hard enough to break it .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 03:08 pm:

You might also want to look real close at the bottom of that shut off valve...I have one just like it and it leaks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 04:01 pm:

I would throw away that valve and copper line with compression fittings. Copper work hardens with vibration. and then cracks. The compression fittings also reduce fuel flow.

I use steel brake line from Autozoner. They have it in all lengths, and already fitted with good fittings.

It's also a good idea to have some hose at the end of the line to absorb vibrations.

A valve near the carb is a convenience, but no substitute for a valve under the tank. If you get a carb fire, you won't be able to reach that valve.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 04:25 pm:

Michael- that is a fine looking Hack posted on your profile page!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 06:21 pm:

A couple additional points.
Permatex number 2 is not alcohol proof, and barely alcohol resistant. However, I am still using it on fuel lines because it does "seem" to protect itself enough to still work well in fuel line fittings. You want a fair but small amount (#2) between all threads lines and fittings, but not inside the lines themselves (I often use a toothpick to apply it for fuel line parts). I have not yet had a leak on any fitting I have sealed with Permatex number 2. (Except for a cracked copper line, thank you Ralph)

In the shut-off valve itself. Use regular bar hand-soap. Wet it (the soap bar) good and smear it all around the taper ends. Again, and especially, do not get any inside the fuel passage holes or lines. If you plug a line, elbow, or worse, a fuel jet, it will likely NOT flush out without a full dis-assembly and cleaning.
The soap is almost gasoline impervious and won't harden quickly. It will eventually need to be taken apart again and redone, but I have had them work great for many years done this way.
The Permatex number 2 may be "non-hardening", but it will dry and/or harden enough that inside a taper valve will make the valve difficult to turn. And when you do turn it, the Permatex will roll into little tiny balls forcing the taper against the spring and open up a leak path. I won't say don't ask me how I know, I will tell you. It happened to me about forty years a ago.
I like Permatex products and use a lot of number 2 on both fuel lines and gaskets. I also usually carry a partial tube in the car. My only financial connection to Permatex is I buy their products (disclaimer).

A trick to "narrow down" the area of a small leak. Tear off a small piece of paper towel. Hold it under the fuel line with just a small edge pointing straight up. Barely touch that edge to the bottom of the line. Even a tiny amount of fuel that you cannot otherwise see or feel will soak into the edge of paper towel and expand into a wet spot that you can see. By moving along slowly, touching, and pulling away, then touching again with another dry spot, you can narrow down the leak and drip/run area. Then sitting at the ready, thoroughly dry the entire area with a paper towel. Again, touching and moving a dry edge of a small piece of paper towel, keep touching the various suspects until you find where the leak comes out first.
This method , in a few minutes, can find the leaky offender in a six inch stack of fittings.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael sharkey on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 09:30 pm:

Thanks guys .
I was looking on langs website for gas lines and I found this . What do you guys think ?.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael sharkey on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 09:32 pm:

This would get ride of all the joints


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael sharkey on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 09:36 pm:

And how does a carb catch on fire


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Spencer Vibert on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 10:14 pm:

Michael, my carb caught on fire when the 4th cylinder intake valve was stuck wide open as soon as the plug fired my carb imitated a roman candle, always have a small fire extinguisher in your car for this reason


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 10:17 pm:

I'm surprised no one has mentioned Loctite #37615 as an alternative to Permatex No. 2 or teflon tape. The Loctite stuff is a white, non-hardening paste that comes in what looks like an oversize lipstick tube. Cost is quite reasonable and it works really well. It's fairly inexpensive and I'm still using the first tube I ever bought. I've tried all the other stuff, and the Loctite seems to be really foolproof. Yes, you can take the parts back apart easily. Here is a website to look at, but you can probably buy it at your local NAPA.

http://www.etrailer.com/Tools/Loctite/LT37615.html?feed=npn&gclid=CIWh5NWIzLgCFU fZQgodUTQAGg

On the subject of finding the leak, have you considered the florescent dye that you add to the gas ? Again, NAPA stores carry the whole florescent kit. The kit consists of a small bottle of dye, a black light flashlite, and a special pair of glasses. Total cost of kit is around $20. Again, this stuff truly works. No matter how small the seep, you will be able to see a yellow glow within seconds of pouring gas into the system.

Usual disclaimer: I have no financial connection with NAPA or Loctite.

Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 10:27 pm:

Michael, I would get rid of that copper line and install a steel one. That valve will work great. Also packing type fittings are better than ferrule because they will allow the line to move around at the ends rather than holding it solid. Also the packings will not bite into and weaken the line like the ferrule ones will. http://www.modeltford.com/item/2910.aspx
http://www.modeltford.com/item/2913N.aspx

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Lovejoy, So Cal on Friday, July 26, 2013 - 01:46 am:

Stephen, would those kind of fittings work for oil lines too?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Friday, July 26, 2013 - 02:18 am:

Michael,
Pay attention, not all the products mentioned before take gasoline just read the user manuel before.
Did you look out for cracks in the line or the carburetor body where the conic tap of the elbow goes in (Sometimes hard to see). If you have a crack a new valve will not work .

Good luck
Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael sharkey on Friday, July 26, 2013 - 02:32 am:

Merci Beaucoup Andre . Je me suis enseigné le français. I aide réellement avec prendre des femmes. I think I spelt everything correct and with correct ponctuation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael sharkey on Friday, July 26, 2013 - 02:33 am:

Sorry punctuation


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Friday, July 26, 2013 - 08:51 am:

Use loctite 567. I got mine from Emedco.com Expensive, but works great on all types of petroleum fittings. I even use it on the hydraulic fittings for my car lift. No leaks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Friday, July 26, 2013 - 09:11 am:

Good Morning Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Friday, July 26, 2013 - 09:52 am:

If you order that valve, order some Fuel Lube too. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael sharkey on Friday, July 26, 2013 - 10:06 am:

Ok will do Dan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Friday, July 26, 2013 - 08:28 pm:

Nice Depot Hack Michael. Keep it away from those moldy walls or spend the money to paint the walls with moisture proof paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael sharkey on Monday, July 29, 2013 - 12:30 am:

Hey Dave . That's where I pulled the hack out of . I have it stored in a heated garage . But thanks for tho concern anyway .


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