Main bearing square socket needed.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Main bearing square socket needed.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 08:34 am:

Is there such a thing as a 9/16 square end socket with 1/2 inch drive which would make it easy to torque the front and center mains on a T engine? Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 08:53 am:

I bought my 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 square drive socket sets at Sears. They are Craftsman brand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 09:16 am:

You shouldn't torque from the square end anyway. Use the nut end. Reading torque from the square end (the bolt head) includes twist of the bolt and thus reduced compression force at the point where it's really needed--At the main cap.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 09:41 am:

I picked this info from this very forum when the forum first got started around 10-12 years ago. A 9/16" 12 point socket from Sears #50741 works great. Mine will be put to good use this morning.

9/16" 12 point socket


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 09:57 am:

Ken, I agree it is better to torque from the nut end but, there is no way my torque wrench is going to fit in the space between the cylinders. I'm pretty good at estimating how to tighten bolts without a torque wrench but, when it comes to mains and rod bolts, I'd rather have it exact. I will look around some more and see what I can find. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Conklin on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 10:55 am:

You can get creative with an old box wrench an old socket and a welder. It worked for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 11:01 am:

Welding up a special wrench is easy but what will the difference in torque values be? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 12:32 pm:

If you use a torque wrench with a clawfoot open end, is any adjustment in torque specs (from using a traditional socket) that the wrench reads necessary?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Conklin on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 01:04 pm:

The "adapter" can be snapped onto the torque wrench in 4 different positions, if it is snapped on 90 degrees to the left or right the difference in readings would be minimal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 01:13 pm:

Thank you, Donald.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 01:14 pm:

The nut on the drivers side between cylinders, I don't think a claw foot could do much without being modified. There is not much swing room even for the correct Ford 12 pt wrench.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 01:40 pm:

Bud, try this one on for size.

Torque adaptors

Liberated from Skinned Knuckles magazine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 01:49 pm:

Why would you need to torque them? Ford did not have torque specs for any bolts on a T that I know of. You won't apply to much torque with a standard wrench unless you are awfully strong. I only torque the head bolts as they are easy to get at. KB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 01:59 pm:

Actually there is a torque range for many of the nuts and bolts, its set by the length of the wrench sold or supplied by Ford for each job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 02:02 pm:

I have always torqued the bolt, and holding the nut. No Difference.

Pull to 80 foot pounds, and I also use new lock washers on the front and center bolts under the nuts, and keys on the rear main.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 02:11 pm:

John your photo correctly shows the Sears socket is an 8 point.

Many major tool companies made 9/16 double squared (8 point) sockets.
With a little trial and error you may find that regular size 12 point (triple square) sockets,
either fractional or metric may fit some square sizes snugly.
Im not sure if there is a 12 point match for the 9/16 square.

Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Sunday, July 28, 2013 - 03:56 pm:

OK John, I took your advice and went looking for a 12 point socket. I only found one store that had them. I took a bolt with me to be sure. Although the head of the bolt takes a 9/16 open wrench, it is actually a 5/8 that is needed when using a 12 point socket. It fit perfectly and allowed me to torque the mains easily. Thanks for all the great responses. This forum is a real life saver.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Monday, July 29, 2013 - 11:05 pm:

Use an 8 point socket. Grabs better than a 12.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Tuesday, July 30, 2013 - 12:42 am:

http://www.amazon.com/Martin-267H-Opening-Overall-Industrial/dp/B0002FS69A


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Tuesday, July 30, 2013 - 01:11 am:

If you keep an eye out, 9/16" 4 point sockets come up on the end of a few old tools. I have two, both different brands, each having a different tool at the other end. Perhaps these were made for Ts originally. I get things as tight as I can with a ring spanner and use the socket in the final line up of the split pin holes.

Herm's post has one which looks much like a third one I have which has split at the corners of the socket. A welder will fix it for use.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Tuesday, July 30, 2013 - 01:14 am:

I think I bought my set of 8 point sockets from McMaster Carr.


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