OT - Enclosed or Inclosed trailer....choices

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: OT - Enclosed or Inclosed trailer....choices
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 10:11 am:

I am considering buying a box trailer, at least 8x7.5x20. What are your choices and why? I looked at the other thread about tow vehicles and saw some really beautiful rigs. I think it is time for me to update.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 11:16 am:

Wes, I would give some serious thought to a V nose or some type to tapered nose to cut the wind. A flat nose empty box trailer can be like towing a parachute.
Also, some anti-sway and load levelers are helpful as a box trailer in the wind or passing an 18 wheeler can cause the trailer to move around a lot even with a good tow vehicle.
Oh, I almost forgot, trailer brakes are also needed.
Do it right and have fun pulling that car and trailer to the fun tours.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 11:23 am:

I agree with Willie's posting. Interstate trailers are light and relatively cheap. That being said I have worn one of theirs out. It got so after every trip I would spend at least a hour putting it back together (tightening and replacing screws). But I have done a lot of high mileage towing.
Nice plus of a enclosed trailer is a extra parking space/garage!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 12:30 pm:

My thoughts are along the lines of the others above.

You want a V-nose or rounded nose. Less wind resistance and a place to store tools, parts, etc.

You want a 2-axle trailer. I know, lots of folks are using single axles, but that pushes their capacity to the max, and a flat or blowout on one tire can cause a catastrophe.

You want electric brakes on all 4 wheels. Surge brakes are better than no brakes, but they tend to be a bigger maintenance headache. A trailer with no brakes is a deathtrap.

You need to be able to load the T in a position that gives a relatively heavy load on the hitch. Some say 2/3 of the total weight, and some say a certain number of pounds. If the load on the tongue is too light, the trailer will fishtail, and you'll have to stop and change your pants.

BTW, if it ever does fishtail, DO NOT slam on the brakes. If you have electric brakes you can reach down to the controller and apply the trailer brakes, but otherwise, ACCELERATE. It's counter-intuitive, I know, but train yourself.

Be aware that with any large enclosed trailer, when an 18-wheeler whooshes past you, the air dam he's pushing will rock your world. It isn't necessarily dangerous if you are expecting it, but, again, it can make you soil your pants.

If your trailer comes with automobile tires, IMMEDIATELY change them to Trailer tires. They are built differently, with much stiffer sidewalls, and the difference they make in the way the trailer tows is significant. Besides, auto tires are not made for the weight you will carry.

You didn't ask about securing the T in the trailer, but if you email me at peteraphra@bellsouth.net I'll be happy to send you info on the system I use. It allows you to use a smaller trailer, since you don't need to be able to get past the car when it's inside, and you can load or unload in 3 minutes.

One last thing: The weight of a T in a trailer makes the use of a boat-trailer type hitch insufficient. You need a drawbar-type hitch, built for the load. And, you need to select the thing whose name I don't know, that goes into the socket on the car and has the ball on it, so that it makes the trailer level. These things are available in inch increments of "offset," and you want the one that makes the trailer level. Why? so the load on the two axles will be the same. This is important for tire wear, load carrying capacity, and so you don't lock up and skid one axle's wheels when you put the brakes on. That can ruin a pair of tires in one trip. Take the time to make sure the trailer tows level, when it and the tow vehicle are loaded for the trip.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 12:31 pm:

I like the wide 8'6" because im fat and it's easy to see when we haul double.I also like longer because they are not so prone to whip and easy to back up.Get at least one roof vent and the diamond tread stone gaurd.Our 18' Haullmark is 15 years old really showing the years and miles.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 12:55 pm:

The thing I don't like about the 8'6" wide is that they are WIDE. So harder to see by, harder to manuevre in tight parking spaces and more wind resistance. I acknowledge the access issue. My solution is I have always gotten a trailer with a front end man door. Well worth the extra cost in my opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 01:02 pm:

On my new trailer the very first thing I did was have the floor and the bottom 6" of the walls coated with spray on box liner. Maybe your car doesn't drip oil!!!
Tying down; I put the system with the tracks on the floor (after the box liner was in) and that uses the straps that fit over the wheels. Fast and secure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 01:16 pm:

I have a trailer with the wheels on the outside. Next one will have the wheel wells on the inside. This gives you move room inside. Think of it this way, The width of the trailer is the same at the fenders. The extra room is good inside so you have room to get by the car in the trailer especially if you want to do any maint on the car.

I have a door on each side which is really nice when parking in crowded lots. You don't have to worry about the guy next to you so close you can't open your door. I don't have a V or slope nose but would get that next time.

I'm not bothered by passing semis, usually I'm doing the passing with my Tahoe as long as there isn't a head wind. PS there's always a head wind.

You'll also want a trailer brake control in your tow vehicle and some mirrors so you can see by the extra width. Remember to keep enough weight on the trailer tongue so it pulls nicely with no whipping. Some lights inside and out are good as well as a winch all of which can be added later.

Don't forget a good spare and have all the tires balanced cause you'll need it sooner or later if you tow enough. I found mine on Craigslist in Las Vegas.
Good luck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 01:24 pm:

I have both a V nose and flat nose trailer and do not notice any appreciable difference in my gas mileage. They are both 16' trailers from the same manufacturer. I would go for the wider style, load leveling hitch set up and anti-sway device for the safest trailering. With a dual axle and four wheel electric brake system you should have no issues and if you take care of the your trailer it should last a good 20 years. I just got rid of a 23' trailer that I have been using since 1979. I screw drip pans down along the center of my trailer and keep them filled with a thin layer of clay kitty litter to take care of any oil drips. You just scoop up the oil soaked litter and throw a bit more down in its place from time to time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 01:38 pm:

See classifieds; trailer for sale.















Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 02:17 pm:

Nice looking trailer, but I would prefer less of a blunt front. Three axles should help stabilize the trailer. (Never pulled a three axle)
Val, a V nose does help mileage unless you a pulling with a gas guzzler and than maybe you would not notice it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roar Sand on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 02:28 pm:

It has been mentioned before, but make sure you buy an inertia based trailer brake controller and not a time based one. I made that mistake and wasted my money. My son tows a lot, and he has the inertia type, and it makes the towing experience much nicer. Older types used pendulums and could be a pain to zero out when mounting. New ones use electronic accelerometers. Do your research.
I would question the idea of bed liner type spraying the inside. If there is some form of sealer on the underside, moisture could (will) get trapped in between and accelerate rot. Oil soaked wood does not rot.
Good luck finding "ST" trailer tires that are not made in China. In the travel trailer community the consensus seems to be that "LT" tires are just fine for trailers as long as the load capacity is adequate. Lots of sad stories out there about Chinese tires.
Everything that has been said about getting the trailer level and at least 15% of the total loaded trailer weight on the tongue holds true, and I am a fan of the anti sway load leveling type hitches.
Gorgeous coupe, even if it is a bow tie! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 03:48 pm:

Willie that must be my problem! I can get almost 15mpg in Florida but around 8mpg in the mountains. I added a deflector to the roof rack of my tow vehicle and that made a bit of a difference with both trailers but it is less than 1mpg so it usually isn't worth the trouble to put it on. Unless you have a diesel trailering is just plain expensive and I am not sure the extra cost of going diesel is worth it either unless you do a hell of a lot of trailering.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 04:40 pm:

Wes,
I'll bet the hack in your profile is taller than a normal T. Make sure you get a trailer tall enough. Mine isn't--I can't haul my TT, I have to take the top off my hack, and let the top down on my touring (already forgot and trashed top of touring twice). Make sure the door opening is tall enough for you. Also, many manufacturers have a tendency to build "well enough" and only put a pair of 3500 lb axles under their trailers--half the max GVW is the wt of an empty trailer! A 20 ft will haul a T, but, a 24 ft will haul 2 T's or a T and a golf cart or a lot of other combinations of things that we seem to acquire. I like a 4in square drop down jack, with twin 5K axles for a 24ft. Get the v-nose even if you pull with an RV--the extra inside space comes in handy. There's a lot of used trailers out there, but, often too low and too light duty for me. If you don't find what you need, try http://www.elite-trailers.com/ . I've bought several trailers over the years from this "mom & pop" manufacturer in Crestview, FL, who will quickly build you what you want for a fair price. Tell them I sent you. Good luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 04:48 pm:

Ok so once you decide on a trailer, exactly how do you tie a T down on it? Realistically?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 05:13 pm:

Bill;
Why would you need all those axles?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 05:56 pm:

William,
That topic has been beat to death on this forum! Lot of different personal preferences, but, use common sense and basic knowledge. How I tie down depends on where it's at on the trailer, which is often driven by what else is on the trailer. What I use as a basic rule is that front and back straps need to pull away from each other or toward each other. You can have fixed D rings on the floor, or tracks with adjustable points, or the trailer framework if an open floor. Mostly common sense in each different situation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 06:40 pm:

Roar
If you look at the pictures Bill posted it has black and white floor tiles (or maybe it is linoleum. Similar concept except the tiles usually start to lift once a little oil soaks between the cracks. The box liner is cheaper and really durable!!


I located the spare high up on the wall just across from the front door


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 06:51 pm:

If i had my druthers id druther have a 36' 5'th wheel try axel with the fantastic vents found in some rv's A work bench in the gooseneck with cubords Gennerater,air compresser and a new Ford Diesel up front.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Thomas on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 07:29 pm:

My trailer is all aluminum and has torque flex suspension. The suspension makes it quiet and it pulls well. V nose and door up front is really nice. I opted for vents in the sides and not on the roof. Two axle trailer with brakes all around. I finally replaced the tires with "real trailer tires", and haven't blown one yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 09:17 pm:

Have a metal, V nose made to your specs. Tall enough for any body style, long enough for the T, tools and anything you or your wife find on a tour, and wide enough that you can get around on either side. Ramp and side doors,Torflex axles, electric brakes,electric tongue jack, load levelers and AC and DC lights inside. Hold car using wrecker hooks and pre-sized chain on front and ratchets and wrecker hooks on the rear. Weld some re-bar on inside at various heights the length of trailer to hang stuff on like chairs, jackets, etc. Good to go and little or no maintenance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 11:00 pm:

I had my v-nose, extra tall trailer built by Royal Cargo in Ill. It was special built from their standard list of options. It has extra width and 18'long plus a 5' V nose. Has a lot of extras and cost $7200.00 at the factory.
extras include:
1. extra heavy duty rear ramp door.
2.2 ea. recessed track tie downs the complete length including in v-nose.
3. LED exterior lights
4. Beaver tail
5. Bogie rear rollers (2)
6. Electric tong jack including RV style inside mounted battery in exterior vented sealed case.
7. Side mounted spare in V-nose
8. Winch plate welded to frame
9. Aluminum domed roof vice heaver galv-aluminum
10.Up graded security locks
11.White side wall inside lining
12.2 Dexter 10K flex axles
13.Higher load rating tires vice standard
14.Extra tall height so I can drive my 13 T touring in with top up.
15.Hinged flip at edge of rear ramp for ease of loading
16.2 interior lights vice 1
17.2 front frame sockets for easy lift bar attachment
18.sway bar ball
19.Exterior vent cover so vent can be left open

The flex axles allow the trailer to set lower than standard leaf springs making it easier to load/un-load. Also, the long V-nose provides a great place for the winch and great storage area.

Very happy with how the trailer tows....also, provides great car storage. I was able to work directly with the factory sales saving some dealer mark up. For a reasonable fee, a local dealer did the title work and provided me a one way temp. plate to get it back to California. Very happy with the trailer. I coated the 3/4" plywood floor with thinned urethane and use cardboard to cover the floor where the T drips oil. Works great, keep the oil off the floor and I replace the cardboard when it gets saturated. When away on tours, all ready have cardboard to place under the T when parked at Hotel.

Sorry for using so many words......buying an enclosed car trailer....you have many things to consider.

Look on e-bay for v-nose car or cargo trailers....some great deals there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 12:09 am:

Check out www.ebay.com item #221270592892
Enclosed Trailer is 16ft. with 2ft. V-nose....Buy it now $3350.00 also listed is many options available as up grades. Let your fingers do some shopping on line....ebay is just one possible source.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 03:10 pm:

Wow.. You put a question up on the forum and go away for the day and look what happens. What a great bunch of guys...lots of ideas. Let's see my hack and the 23 touring are both seven feet tall at the back, I'm guessing a TT is a little taller, so that calls for an eight foot opening, now if I could convince the trailer builder to flip the rear door frame that would put the rear door spring under the floor and use longer cables to pulleys to the door that would lower the roof a little bit. The front definitely needs to be v nosed, I like the idea of mounting the spare up on the wall, gaining some needed floor space, using up the wasted space on the tongue and last but not least wind resistance. As for a slope roof easy enough to do before the trailer is built. Now length, I really need only 14' for one car, but that is an odd size for an 8' wide trailer, 20' is standard, lots of 22's on the net, but it was suggested go for a 24' and carry two cars. Since this will be my last major purchase, I think it'll be 24'. Axles, two Dexter with brakes on each, 5m each. I figure the weight of this trailer, empty will be close to 1/2 the axle capacity. The tow vehicle with proper hitch and brake module will have to come later. Side and a roof vents, 36" door, LED lights and e-tracks on the floor are already in the plan. I was thinking of painting the floor and walls rather than a rubber mat, tiles or spray on liner. To me, wood is cheap and easy to replace as necessary besides I liked the idea of removable pans with cat litter. Another thing I found on one of the trailer sites was a comparison of screwed vs. unscrewed side walls, I was impressed the screwed panels broke while the 3M panels held very well. Besides to my thinking less holes equals less leak possibilities. Now I just have to make this happen, and once again THANK YOU ALL for your generous ideas and suggestions. Wesley
PS The Fleet in front of the T house


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy Kelly on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 03:29 pm:

I suggest that roof vents be on the delete list. They are prone to leak, maybe from the start but certainly over time. Even the best ones have been known to leak. And, if you encounter a hail storm like we did recently in New London MN in connection with the New London to New Brighton Run, you will find the roof vent(s) demolished and your car with water and hail directly below where the roof vent(s) yielded. You may even find some hail damage to your car.

Side vents, which can be opened such that they are either in the scoop or exhaust position, or closed, placed on the sides of the trailer near the roof are the way to go. In good weather you can have the front vents scoop and the rear vents exhaust. In rainy weather you can have both the front and rear vents exhaust.

High end trailer manufacturers, who install "one piece" roofs, will go so far as to even discourage roof vents. IF you are willing to settle for leaks, there's no need for a one piece roof.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy Kelly on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 05:04 pm:

I suggest that roof vents be on the delete list. They are prone to leak, maybe from the start but certainly over time. Even the best ones have been known to leak. And, if you encounter a hail storm like we did recently in New London MN in connection with the New London to New Brighton Run, you may find the roof vent(s) demolished and your car with water and hail directly below where the roof vent(s) yielded. You may even find some hail damage to your car.

Side vents, which can be opened such that they are either in the scoop or exhaust position, or closed, placed on the sides of the trailer near the roof are the way to go. In good weather you can have the front vents scoop and the rear vents exhaust. In rainy weather you can have both the front and rear vents exhaust.

High end trailer manufacturers, who install "one piece" roofs, will go so far as to even discourage roof vents. IF you are willing to settle for leaks, there's no need for a one piece roof.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy Kelly on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 05:10 pm:

Hummm.....

I am not attempting to drive home my point. The substantially duplicative post was in error.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 06:45 pm:

Richard;

When I ordered this trailer, I thought we'd also be using it at work for taking merchandise, tools, etc., to jobsites, in addition to keeping the T in it.

I ALSO thought we'd acquire a 3/4 or full ton pickup to pull it with, but this never happened, either.

When new, the trailer came with the two rear axles, but had a fairly heavy tongue weight.

Mary & I weighed the cost of a 3/4 or full ton truck to pull the trailer with vs. having a third axle installed up front which made it easy to pull by her Expedition.

It's been a wonderful trailer with almost no use. We now have room at the office to put all the cars, so the trailer isn't needed any more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Friday, August 23, 2013 - 11:46 pm:

Wes,
PLEASE get at least the 5K axles (comes with 225 tires that are avail in higher load ratings than the 205's that come with the 3500 axles)--cheap upgrade, but expensive to do after you realize the 3500's aren't enough. A friend just repaired a "screwless trailer". It would have been easy to screw the panel where it came loose, but, the guy wanted it glued back. Almost the entire side had to be removed and re fitted. I recently spoke with a GA manufacturer of the glued trailers and when they repair them under warrantee, they reserve the right to use screws. Finally, here's what happens when your trailer is not tall enough and you forget!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Saturday, August 24, 2013 - 12:39 am:

Wes form Les
True story:
A good friend who had a screwless trailer was traveling across the hot desert and stopped to get gas. When he walked around the trailer to make sure the tires were up and everything was normal, he was in for a surprise! The aluminum skin on one side was gone! His model T was safe inside but was on display for all to see. The good part is there was no damage to his 12 T touring.
Needles to say, the replacement trailer skin had more screws than normal. We can laugh but it really was not that funny.
Yes, my trailer has the aluminum skin screwed in place. If a panel is damaged, it is much easier to replace vice having it glued in place.
Something to think about before you have a trailer made to your requirements. The manufacture that made the 16ft. with v-nose trailer on e-bay for $3500.00 also will provide the extra height and 5K axles that you want.
Make up a list of options that you want before trying to remember everything if you are suddenly faced with placing an order.
One thing most forget about is having bogie rollers added on the frame at the rear to help when dragging going out of driveways. This keeps the lower rear edges from getting tore up.
Not that expensive when having a trailer made....just another item to consider.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Saturday, August 24, 2013 - 08:34 am:

Once again Thank You for some more great suggestions. Bogies on a 24' trailer are a must. A roof vent isn't that important when considering hail and road speed, plastic vs. high speed golf balls... Again 3500# axles on a 24' is ok if you are only ever going to hall potato chips..one or two T's need 5k axles, bigger tires and brakes, just common sense. Inside height, specifically door clearance is what started this discussion for me. I didn't realize the repair problems of screwless exterior panels, but they sound convincing. I wonder if riveting the sides could be an option, screws scare me. I have two carports that don't move and screws are popping out all over them, now bonce them down the highway ... Thanks again fellas. Wes


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Saturday, August 24, 2013 - 09:12 am:

Your carport don't have screws every few inches! I pull mine several thousand miles a year since I bought it in 05, and haven't noticed a loose screw yet. I spoke to my friend in FL the other day about building me a new trailer, and he said he frequently sends trailers to Sikeston, MO.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Haynes on Saturday, August 24, 2013 - 09:22 am:

I would suggest buying the tire pressure sensors for the trailer tires. You can monitor the tire pressure in the cab of the towing vehicle. It is not always easy to see the tires of a wide trailer. It can save you a tire or two and pay for itself. Not to mention the damage a flat tire can do to an aluminium trailer when it comes apart.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Saturday, August 24, 2013 - 09:31 am:

If height is a concern, and it is with T's, go for a beaver tail. The back 2 feet or so drops down and gives more clearance under the rear door. The T doesn't rise those last 6 inches until you are in. I didn't trust a 7 foot interior with my 82 inch tall touring, as the inside roof beams took up a few inches and the T could bounce. 7.5 feet is plenty and you don't need to pull an extra 6inches through the air. BTW, I got 20% better economy in the mountains from Kanab home due to lower air Resistance at 5-6000 ft than the lower flats of eastern Colorado,Nebraska, and S.D. The ecoboost turbo's made up for the rarer air and HP stayed close to that on the flats.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy Kelly on Saturday, August 24, 2013 - 12:23 pm:

In addition to the beaver tail, opting for a dove tail in addition to the beaver tail will add more clearance and less drag at the rear when traversing dips or sharp inclines. This is especially true for long trailer, even those with rollers.

While the beaver tail drops the floor inside the trailer to add head room under the rear most cross structure and for the last X number of feet inside the trailer, the dove tail raises the exterior structure for a similar distance. It's a bit like the trailer coming to a point at the rear most edge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Saturday, August 24, 2013 - 01:21 pm:

John good idea about the TPM for the tires. you're right about the damage that can be caused when one blows out on the freeway.

That trailer on Ebay looks like a great deal. Wish I was closer and I'd get a new one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Sunday, September 01, 2013 - 08:46 am:

I found a trailer on CL at a reasonable price. It meets most of the criteria discussed here, it's short comings can and will be changed as time and money permit. What a moose. What a story to get it home. I am pleased and really tired. One more time I'd like to Thank Everyone for their input.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, September 01, 2013 - 09:55 am:

Wes,The picture of the cargo trailer got me to thinking.For car hauling a ramp door is much nicer but in some uses side doors or as pictured are better.Some semi open top dump trailers tailgates work both ways so it sure would be handy on our enclosed haullers.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Sunday, September 01, 2013 - 02:39 pm:

Wes;
No sway bar or torsion hitch??????????
Wouldn't leave home without them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Sunday, September 01, 2013 - 06:31 pm:

Ken you are right about a ramp door. but this trailer is 8.5' wide and 9' tall from the ground. That makes the door about 8'x8' a really big door to pickup for an old man no matter what springs are helping. I thought about camping in it at Chickasha, I could leave one of the doors open for air at night, just add a screen. Just thinking.. When I drove a 6 wheeler up in Chicago, my tailgate hinged at the top for dumping and spreading and when unpinned and chained like a giant pickup, I would carry old gas tanks. That was interesting, how to slide an old tank without sparks... very carefully, extra shorts, etc..
Rich no sway bar or torsion hitch for yesterdays ride, but that's covered in the "What a story to get home." There will be corrections.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Sunday, September 01, 2013 - 08:40 pm:

I stand 5'7" took these after dinner Sunday









I think they'll fit


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Sunday, September 01, 2013 - 08:53 pm:

I like it! Looks like it may haul both. Now, if you trade some of those vans for a good diesel pusher motorhome to tow with, you'll be ready to go!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, September 01, 2013 - 09:07 pm:

Wes,I like the 8'6" and what are you going to use for ramps?? When i put the recessed D rings in i centered them over cross members with long bolts and plates on the underside of the cross members.I do not use a equalizer hitch but with 140 gallon of fuel our F-250 crew cab is heavy!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Sunday, September 01, 2013 - 09:51 pm:

Wes,
Handy item is a winch. I found some 2" hitch receiver tubes at Petit Jean a while back. I welded one to a piece of flat steel big enough to reach 2 cross braces under my floor near the front and drilled through the crossmember, plywood flooring and steel to secure the plate in place. I have a winch from Sam's club that slides into a 2" receiver. When I'm going to haul something of unknown condition, or take a T on a long trip, I carry the winch with me and install if necessary, otherwise you're only tripping over a 2"x8" piece of steel in the floor. If that bothers you, there's only 4 bolts to remove everything.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Monday, September 02, 2013 - 07:19 am:

Mike, yes it will fit two cars. It's 24'+2' long. I have a 3000# winch from HF new in the box for it. I was thinking about using etrack on the floor for tie downs and a piece in the nose for the winch. T's only weigh 1500# and roll on 30" wheels, they don't offer much rolling resistance. I made two ramps for the white van out of 2x8 x14' treated lumber. these should do the trick for now. As for the vans, silver 3/4T is gone, replaced with orange 1/2T and is available. Blue 1T is the working horse and is needed for now. White 1T is for sale or trade, tan 1/2 is daily driver and rigged for ambulance service, I take a disabled Vet up to Columbia and his 6' plus length can lay down for the ride. Brown 1/2T is complete and runs but not legal, it is for sale or trade. Mike I received your PM and will consider going.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house on Monday, September 02, 2013 - 01:36 pm:

Wes,
Please allow me to add my 2 cents worth after viewing the picture of your van/trailer hitch/trailer. One of many things I learned in the army is to cross the safety chains under the hitch making a 'sling' in case of a broken hitch. My enclosed V nose, beaver tail is 7' wide and 7'10" high. I have to park some Model Ts where the fenders are 2" from the side walls so I'll have 4" outside of the runningboards on the other side to get out. Some times it requires stripping neked and profuse use of Wesson Oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, September 02, 2013 - 03:11 pm:

I was into George's post - crossed chains - becuse I once had the hitch on a boat trailer come loose and the crossed chains stopped the tongue from hitting the ground. The only thing that was hurt was my pride..

But once I got the the wesson oil and neked he lost me. At least he could have used Virgin Olive oil! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Monday, September 02, 2013 - 03:50 pm:

George, Fred, The chains were crossed on this trip for sure. I lost one once a long time ago, it wasn't pretty. They say experience is the best teacher, but the tuition is very high. As far as the oil discussion goes, I have some Gunk and a wire brush..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael White on Wednesday, December 04, 2013 - 04:04 pm:

I just picked up my new 26' ATC all aluminum trailer today , it towed fantastic , I had to keep looking in my rear view mirror to see if it was still attached to my truck it towed so nice. I had it built with 8' ceilings so I can put any brass era car with its top up inside , The only scientifically proven way to break the wind on the front is to have one of those bubble cones added to the front of the trailer , I researched this thru and thru to see if a v-nose would help with the wind and they said no. I have a v-nose construction trailer and cannot feel any difference when I go on the highway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael White on Wednesday, December 04, 2013 - 04:12 pm:

26' ATC all aluminum trailer


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael White on Wednesday, December 04, 2013 - 04:17 pm:

Interior of ATC trailer


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael White on Wednesday, December 04, 2013 - 04:19 pm:

One of my Brass era cars 1913 - T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Micheal Crowe on Wednesday, December 04, 2013 - 06:09 pm:

Get a one piece roof also. Stays on much better. I just bought a new Doolittle trailer made in Mo. it is 8.6 by 18


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Wednesday, December 04, 2013 - 06:17 pm:

Drive the T, problem eliminated. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, December 04, 2013 - 08:32 pm:

Keith, my thoughts too! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Wednesday, December 04, 2013 - 08:40 pm:

Micheal you have a couple of nice looking pieces of machinery. You should be proud. What is your tow vehicle?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Micheal Crowe on Wednesday, December 04, 2013 - 09:28 pm:

I have a 1/2 ton Chevy HD with 6.4 engine in it and I can pull the trailer with the T in it 80mph. It will follow me as straight as an arrow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Wednesday, December 04, 2013 - 10:05 pm:

Don't recall seeing it mentioned , but, You need to insure it. I'm not an insurance person, but, I was surprised years ago by the misinformation that was passed around. I was told that your tow vehicle ins covered anything you were pulling. However, the truth is, if you sling your trailer into someone, your vehicle liability ins will fix the other guy's car, but, the damage to your trailer will not be covered unless you have a policy on the trailer itself. It's cheap--new trailers aren't! Basic rule of thumb is: If the ins company offers separate coverage for it, you have to pay for it to be covered. If a hurricane or tornado flattens my steel building, it's covered by my homeowners ins, along with welders, coke machine, etc, however, my cars and trailers would have to have their own coverage or I'm just out!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Thursday, December 05, 2013 - 07:52 am:

Mike;
I've had enclosed trailers for the last 25 yrs and never had insurance on them. I have always paid cash for them, so I never thought about ins. I was always told, when being towed, my tow vehicle's ins. took care of it. As far as while the trailer is setting in my yard, I've always thought I should put ins. on it for vandalism and hurricanes and the like. but never did.


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