1927 rear differential fill plug

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: 1927 rear differential fill plug
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt Christensen on Saturday, September 07, 2013 - 02:39 pm:

I need a tool to remove the rear differential's fill plug on my 1927 Touring. It requires a square drive, but the existing plug is brittle and a little disfigured.

Two questions:
(1) any suggestions for where I can find a square drive of the right size to (hopefully) remove this old, brittle plug?
(2) Are there good replacements (with a more standard head so I can use a wrench)?

Thanks!
Matt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Zahorik on Saturday, September 07, 2013 - 02:41 pm:

I use a 3/8" drive socket wrench.

Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt Christensen on Saturday, September 07, 2013 - 02:49 pm:

Thanks, Mike.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt Christensen on Saturday, September 07, 2013 - 04:11 pm:

Successfully got the fill plug out. I had tried my 3/8" drive earlier, but it had rounded down edges. Bought a new one and it worked. Not a great fit, but good enough.

Still need to find a replacement plug, but half the battle is won.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, September 07, 2013 - 04:34 pm:

Matt

You can easily use a std. pipe plug, male type, easy to find at your hardware store.... so a monkey wrench will remove and tighten. The late Fords went to that pipe thread. The factory plug is a female pipe plug.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, September 07, 2013 - 04:35 pm:

Matt,

It is a standard 1/2 inch pipe thread. So you could go down to Home Depot etc and purchase a 1/2 inch pipe plug there. Or you could purchase one from the vendors see Langs part number 3532B http://www.modeltford.com/pl.aspx?t=s&v=2532B&page=1 Note many of the vendors use the original Ford Part numbers. When you first start looking at the part numbers it takes a little time to understand them and then you will actually be able to use them to better understand your car. In the case of the B on the end of the number that indicated the part was changed enough that it received a suffix on the end. The previous rear axle plug 2532 had fine threads and from 1909-1912 used a slotted head and from around 1913 to 1925ish they used a hex nut end.

From the looks of your plug in the photo you could easily reuse it. It is not a structural part so it is not under load etc like a body to frame bolt etc would be. I like to put a little Permatex #2 on them but that is not necessary. It does not need to be installed as tight as you can make it just tight enough so it seals well and wont back out with the vibrations.

Ive been way behind lately and I notice from your profile you recently started posting or you started posting using another name. If you are new to the forum welcome aboard. If you are new to Ts please let folks know there are lots of things you can learn on your own (like dont hand crank the T when the spark is down it can cause broken arms etc.) or your can learn from others. Nice looking 1927 touring on your profile page. If you have a chance please take a look around the top of the metal channels that hold up the front floorboards and see if you find any numbers or letters stamped into them. Some but not that many of the assembly plants stamped some of their cars with a code so they would know they were produced at that plant. See: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/111490.html
for additional details on assembly plant numbers.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt Christensen on Saturday, September 07, 2013 - 05:20 pm:

Dan and Hap, thank you for bringing me up to speed on the type of plug. I'll try to keep the current plug functional as long as I can. I thought for sure it was going to crumble as I tried to remove it, but luckily it did not.

Hap, you are correct. I recently started posting and had not posted under a different name in the past. I am fairly new to Model Ts. The 27 Touring was my dads for the past 12-13 years. He's owned a few different Ts over the years (having been born in 1925 he felt a strong connection to the T). He was about to get rid of it a few years ago and I told him I would love to keep it in the family, so earlier this year I had it shipped from his garage in Colorado to mine in Florida. It's been a blast to get to know it and work on it, and I love to drive it around Gainesville. There doesn't seem to be many stock Ts in this area (perhaps they're hiding).

I'll check out the floor board channels and see if there are numbers/letters stamped there. Had the floor boards up last week, but didn't notice anything. I do know it was made in Canada.

Regards,
Matt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, September 07, 2013 - 05:33 pm:

Matt,

That's great that you kept the T in the family. Note for 1926-27 Canadian Ts there is a 99% chance that if you look about an inch below the radiator rod on the engine side of the firewall you will see a letter and a series of numbers similar to the one shown below (photo courtesy of Michael Velling):



Apparently Ford of Canada used the following letters on their 1926-27 cars to indicate the plant the car was assembled.

F for Ford City -- Ford Canada's main plant
M for MONTREAL, QUEBEC
T for Toronto, Ontario
W for Winnipeg, Manitoba
V for Vancouver, British Columbia

If you do find something, please let us know what and if it is blank, please let us know that also. Does your car also have the square drive Robertson screws in several places?

Previous thread where the Canadian Assembly Plant numbers were discussed.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, September 08, 2013 - 11:21 am:

Use the square end of your monkey wrench that was supplied with the car! Well, I know you probably don't have it, but they are in every antique store, and on ebay all the time.


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