Ot 1940 ford 85 hp motor

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Ot 1940 ford 85 hp motor
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Oldman on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 06:29 am:

Hello,

My 1940 ford all original one ton pickup needs a ring and valve job. The blowby from the breather is unreal, valves sticking, etc.Which is best, drop exhaust and tie rod and try to do in the truck, or pull the motor. What is best way to pull the motor with minimum effort.

Many thanks. Andy O


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 08:34 am:

A little off topic on a Model T forum but for me, pulling the entire works out made it easy to work on.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 08:44 am:

The Fordbarn Early V8 forum has a lot of guys who know these old Fords and are very willing to help.
I'd say pull the engine to work on it.
Good luck and have fun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Holcomb, Watertown WI on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 08:59 am:

pull the engine. By the time you get everything off and out of the way to do the work, its really only a few more bolts and the engine can come out. Plus, if you need to put in some new valve seats, it has to come out anyway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT J STEINER on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 09:06 am:

Pull the motor.it take about an hour..its real easy.. this way if you break a stud and you probably will its easy to repair, also you might as well pull the pan and clean out the sludge that is built up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 09:19 am:

Logistics, especially on trucks, is the hardest to over come. Laying over fenders and hanging upside down to work in the engine compartment is no fun at all. Even if you can sit on the edge of the fenders, leaning over to work on the engine is a back-breaking position. But youth has a way of ignoring such inconveniences. :-) Do what you think you can handle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 10:04 am:

Like a Buick man once told me about my '46 Ford convertible: "You have to drop the rearend to lift the radiator cap."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 10:08 am:

Those heads are on studs, not bolts. They can be impossible to get off. Before you disconnect the parts that make the engine run, drain the coolant and back the nuts on the studs off a couple turns and start the engine. It will blow the heads loose on the studs if you are lucky. If not, getting the heads off can be nearly impossible on a Ford flatty that old. BTW, we sold a complete but unknown 85 hp engine that looked ready to bolt in -- or at least looked like it had just come out of something and was set in the corner of the barn -- for $550 at the auction last weekend. At least here they are getting hard to find.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 10:59 am:

You will have to pull the motor and then the fun begins. I say that because to do the valves you will have to get the old guides out which is a major job. They are normally stuck and have to be moved down to get the horshoe keepers out and you will need every possible angle to get to them with a valve bar. I usually have to break the valve heads off or bend them over in order to drive the guides down with a punch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 11:18 am:

I have never worked on a 40 Ford, but the 41 had steel sleeves in the cylinders. If you are lucky, you can pull the sleeves and put in oversize pistons which will fit right into the existing cylinders. This of course all depends on whether this has already been done. In that case you will need to rebore larger.

The valve guides come out with the valves and should be replaced when you replace the valves. If you still have the original lifters, they are solid and the valve stems need to be ground to the right clearance which is a tedious chore.

As old as this engine is, I think you would be served best by pulling the entire engine and taking it to a rebuilder who is familiar with the early V8 engines and have it completely rebuilt.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 11:42 am:

Andy,

Lots of good advice above. I think Norm has hit the main point. Just doing the valves and rings is only going to force whatever's next to fail. Once you go to the trouble of pulling it out, it doesn't make sense to stop short of a complete rebuild, whether you take the whole thing in to a shop or do as much as possible yourself.

I was in a similar situation with a 1964 Mercury 289 a few years ago. I pulled the engine, removed all the stuff bolted to it, then took the heads and block to a machine shop. I had the heads "done" (magnaflux, boil out, surfaced, vales, springs, etc.), and the block "short blocked". They boiled out my sheet metal too, for free. Then I put it back together myself. Ran great!

I'd just hate to see you go to all the trouble and expense, not do it all, get it running, then have it quit shortly thereafter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 01:19 pm:

Pull the engine and overhaul it on an engine stand. Stan Howe gave you a good hint on breaking the heads loose from the block, likely worth a try.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 02:21 pm:

Hi Andy

They used to sell a breather cap with a long enough
flex pipe to run all the way to the back bumper. <@^@>


First if the hood fits well now, then mark around the hinges
so you can get it to fit the same again. (marks may be obvious)

You will need one of these to remove the valves and guides . . .





I vaguely remember that the Fordson tractor adjustable lifters
would replace the original non-adjustable lifters.

Oh, and before you beat the H out of the combined motor mount/water pumps
there is another bolt inside the hose inlets.

Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 03:12 pm:

That may have been Ford Ferguson, not Fordson.
Does anyone else remember ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 03:33 pm:

I gave my 34 Ford a valve and ring job and replaced the big end rod bearings with the block in the car. its probably easier to pull the engine, but my car had never been apart and i wanted to leave as much of the car as untouched as i could.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 04:17 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Oldman on Saturday, September 14, 2013 - 07:58 am:

Thank you gentlemen , makes my ts look like simple toys! Will pull the mill. Andy O


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