Coolant Dripping Out of Overflow When Driving

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Coolant Dripping Out of Overflow When Driving
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 10:21 am:

I've just started driving my 1923 touring/pickup after getting my Missouri historic license plates. I've gone on three trips of about 15 miles each so far. Each time I get home, I notice that some coolant has dripped out of the overflow onto the front axle, is the system just finding its own level after initially being overfilled, or should I be concerned?

The car does not overheat (no steam, and the radiator and engine seem to be a reasonable temperature after my trips). The receipts I got with the car when I bought it say it has a new reproduction radiator in it.

How high should I fill the radiator when the car is cold to ensure that there is enough coolant to allow the thermosiphon effect to do its job?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Danuser on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 10:29 am:

just cover the core don't fill to the top


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 02:25 pm:

If you do overfill it and it is not running hot the coolant will find the proper level which is just above the core. The large upper tank is expansion area. Fill it to where you think it should be and after you run it, let it cool then open the cap and if everything is OK you should see coolant just above the core.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 02:33 pm:

Thanks, that's what I suspected, I'll just keep driving it and checking the level after it cools down after each drive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 02:55 pm:

Mark

You might want to put a Motometer gauge on you Santa list. Some swear at em' and some swear by em'. I'm one of the latter.

Mine has always given consistent readings compared to an infra red thermometer. Its nice to know what you coolant temperature is.

Plus it looks cool! ;o)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By michael grady on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 03:01 pm:

so...while we're on this thread, is there any reason to put antifreeze in? I live in a no-freeze zone.

Michael


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 03:04 pm:

It's not just anti-freeze it also is a coolant and rust inhibitor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 03:09 pm:

The previous owner of my 1923 touring/pickup filled the cooling system with one of the newer, orange, 5-year antifreeze mixtures, it seems to work well.

To my mind (since I store the T in a heated garage), the rust inhibitor feature is the most important to me, and it is the rust inhibitors that get "used up" or consumed over time, which is why the coolant has to be changed periodically (in my case, every 5 years).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 03:14 pm:

Michael,
Many folks run antifreeze for the corrosion protection. Where I live I run 1/3 antifreeze to 2/3 water and for you maybe just 1/4 to 3/4 would provide the rust protection. Others use other rust protection methods if freeze protection is not needed. In any case a 50/50 mix of antifreeze/water would be a waste and reduce the heat transfer efficiency of the coolant.

On the water level in the radiator, too high and you will loose coolant out the over flow. But on the other side, if the level is below the top of the radiator core the thermosiphon cooling system will not work at all.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By michael grady on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 03:32 pm:

I see..thanks. didn't mean to hijack the thread.

Michael


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 06:28 pm:

If you want increased cooling add water wetter which is available at most auto parts stores. I run 50/50 mix for corrosion protection plus water wetter for the cooling benefit. Also there have been several threads that the older style green (Ethylene Glycol) should be used in Ts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 06:34 pm:

I use "soluble oil"...is that about the same as "water wetter"? Its turns the solution white.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 08:01 pm:

The only thing with antifreeze is that if you have any boilovers, it'll be really hard on any paint it touches.

As for me, I run water Spring through Fall and only change to antifreeze when it goes into storage for the Winter.

By running water, this also allows me to top off the radiator and let it find its own level without having to worry about the paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 08:08 pm:

How many people in Florida put just water in their radiator? Was it only 2-3 years ago it got cold enough down there to crack some blocks? Go with anti-freeze mix.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Saitta on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 09:17 pm:

I live in mid Florida and use antifreeze and distilled water


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 09:36 pm:

While I like the idea of using distilled water all summer and switching to antifreeze for the winter, I would worry that the car could have some kind of breakdown just before winter and now I can't start the engine to circulate the antifreeze. It appears you can drain the T engine pretty good but, wouldn't there be pockets of straight water trapped in there that would now freeze?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 10:00 pm:

Dave,
Two comments.

Distilled water by its self is corrosive and you should likely use something to prevent rust.

There is no problem with just draining the water to prevent freezing damage. In the day probably millions of cars were operated just that way.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Dvis on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 10:12 pm:

I've used only distilled water plus antifreeze 50/50 for years. It keeps all of my vehicle cooling systems clean and working well. Distilled water.....the best way to go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 11:15 pm:

Hi: If the T is sitting level it will drain totally dry. There may be some left at a gasket or something like that but it would just be wet and no puddeling. The system is designed to totally drain. As to antifreeze. Even in Florida I would run it for the rust prevention. A motormeter is nice to have. After you get used to it. If climbing a long hill or something like that the motormeter may climb all the way to the steam area. But as soon as you level out, the red in the thermometer will drop very fast. I use mine as a refrence point. If I bury the red in the steam area, I start looking to see how quick Im going to level out. It is just a good tool to help out some, and give you a good idea where the engine temp is. Donnie


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, September 22, 2013 - 01:22 am:

I have used green for years and never presented a problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Sunday, September 22, 2013 - 01:33 am:

Yeah, they're supposed to do that when they're filled above the core. Mine does that too and I purposely over-fill it so it will blow out the excess and automatically bring the volume of coolant to the precisely correct level.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, September 22, 2013 - 10:21 am:

Soluble oil is a water pump lubricant. Model T's don't have water pumps. Regular green anti freeze is for sale everywhere, and works great.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnH on Monday, September 23, 2013 - 12:23 am:

I use soluble oil and it works great. Just a small cup full added to the water is all that's needed. Never overheats and no more rusty water.


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