Here's a new one..........Ford and Vanadium Steel

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Here's a new one..........Ford and Vanadium Steel
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 10:06 am:

I was searching Ford and "torpedo" (trying to determine when Ford first referred to models as "torpedo") and came across this 1909 article. Unlike the earlier versions of how Ford "found" vanadium steel (used since at least early 1907 by Ford Motor Company), this account seems to lay the reason for the switch to vanadium on testing conducted by the military:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 10:34 am:

Too bad Henry didn't apply the same weight logic to the low tension magneto, and leave it out, in favor of a high tension magneto or disturbutor. Patent royalties don't weigh anything.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 11:25 am:

Same old crap RD. Should we ever hope to see or hear anything else?? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 11:32 am:

Oak spokes weigh less than hickory, Bud, but I don't recommend them, and neither did Henry.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 11:39 am:

I give HF a lot of credit in the "spin" department. Wether it was himself or some one close to him the story always seems to alter in his favor over the years. Edison was good at this sort of thing too. Maybe HF took a few lessons on those camping trips. "Ford car wins race" (driver's name on page 3). Later tellings of the posting's subject have him finding the steel personally.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 11:47 am:

Dunno who posted these originally:


1907


1909


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 12:38 pm:

That bent crankshaft makes me think? Maybe The slight flexing from all the years running causes the work hardning that causes the crack's that cause the brakes? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 12:44 pm:

Ralph,
I'd recognize the highlighting anywhere :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 02:12 pm:

Sure Bud, it's the slight flexing causing the fatigue cracks that breaks Model T cranks. A thicker crank flexes less and thus holds up better against metal fatigue. Ford didn't have that long time test knowledge when the T crank was designed back in ~1907 and was too stubborn to change when he knew better, Most T's were worn out well before the crank got broken anyway - they weren't really supposed to hold up for eternity and be driven 100 years later :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 03:36 pm:

I think your right Roger,and 107 years later i think Henry got it right! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 04:48 pm:

Seems to me like Edison took the spin a little further than Henry did. From what I have heard, Edison didn't "invent" anything, but did take credit for everything that was invented by his workers.....just my 2ct.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Saturday, November 02, 2013 - 05:17 am:

The 1907 Ford version about vanadium steel:



Entire story:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/dtk3y8pmsk5k0zc/Ford%20adopts%20New%20Steel%201907.pdf


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