Old photo, More family poses

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Old photo, More family poses
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Friday, November 01, 2013 - 11:35 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Saturday, November 02, 2013 - 08:52 am:

Photo #1.
Uncle is on the running board w/elbow on the toolbox.
Question about the nice toolbox. Have many of you found the placement of the toolbox right below the passenger door to be common practice? or uncommon?

It seems to me that the toolbox in that spot would have been mighty un-handy for the wife's big, full dress. In & out of a T with a big dress would have been cumbersome enough without a toolbox in the way. (my wife would have revolted & won!).

So, am I correct in assuming that the car was owned by a bachelor?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, November 02, 2013 - 09:27 am:

That tool box, if that's what it is, would be darn inconvenient for any one getting in or out. Maybe it's not attached. It even looks like the door would barely clear it. Hopefully it's just a very very sturdy picnic basket just there prior to un packing lunch!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, November 02, 2013 - 10:38 am:

John and Charlie,

John I’m 99.9% sure that even a bachelor would not mount a tool box there. I believe the box is NOT permanently attached, but only sitting there for the photo. Not only would it make it difficult for a passenger to enter the car, but it may even be tall enough to block the 1914 front door from opening (basically the same height as the 1915-1925 doors from the running board). (1914 year based on the 1914 style windshield that folds rearward – realizing there are a few transition models which may have one year body and another year windshield).

In general the tool box, spare tire, etc would be placed where it did not interfere with entering the car. For a tool box that could be between the doors or often it is seen on the side with the “false door” i.e. driver’s side (left side USA cars, right side UK cars until sometime in 1918). And for cars with doors on both sides of the body such as Canada starting in 1912 and UK starting in 1918 they were still placed on the driver’s side because it was difficult to enter the car due to the emergency brake and steering column. And if they were placed on a side with both doors they would often be placed between the two doors so both doors could still be used. You will notice that the box it the photo probably could fit between the two doors – it looks narrow enough to me. But I don’t think any owner would put that tall of a box in front of the only front door. Very small sample size of “two” – both our 1915 Blackie cur off touring and our 1918 touring have the tool box on the driver’s side running board. Both tool boxes would have been installed by previous owners and prior to 1951 when my Dad purchased them. And both of our tool boxes are low enough that a door could be opened even if the box was mounted under a door opening (which they are not).



Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Saturday, November 02, 2013 - 10:42 am:

Perhaps that big case is the camera box and supplies just placed on the running board during the photo shoot.

Great photos by the way!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Saturday, November 02, 2013 - 10:48 am:

I'm willing to bet that first photo was taken the day of the wedding. The bridge is behind the wheel, the groom is in the dark suit, her brothers are in the suits, the father is on the running board and the mother is taking the photo.

As far as the tool box being on the running board, I think it is far easier to take another step up to the top of the tool box and then get into the car than it is to take the step into the car from the running board if you have a big skirt on and it's pretty well filled up inside.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, November 02, 2013 - 10:53 am:

Could be a wedding party. Hard to tell. Hats, ties & jackets were pretty standard back then. Hap: I had one Touring with the box between the doors and I moved it to the false door. Big pain in the chops position wise as far as I was concerned.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, November 02, 2013 - 05:03 pm:

As far as skirts go, it was common practice for many people and some cultures for all women to ride in the back seat only. The tool box in that location may not be a problem for them.
That said, I agree that the box does appear to be not attached. I have seen a few (very few) tool boxes mounted in that location. Usually, they are mounted as others have said, driver's side forward (no door to interfere with), or between the doors on a touring car (either side). Runabouts often have boxes mounted clear back by the fender. Center-door sedans will often have a tool box mounted forward by the front fender because the door location is different. So if you find a running board that clearly had a tool box mounted there, you may speculate that it may have been a sedan.
Thank you Erich B for the pictures!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Griffin on Sunday, November 03, 2013 - 09:01 pm:

Is that a siren mounted on the false door?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Eliason on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 09:43 pm:

Greg,
I believe it is a hand-cranked klaxon type of horn. I have seen a number of variations of this, sometimes described as a 'World War One Chemical Warfare Siren (or Horn)'. Some have the crank on the side instead of the back. In a true Siren (high speed rotor, makes the neighborhood dogs howl) you normally see the ports around the perimeter of the housing as well as a gearbox between the crank and the rotor.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration