How many accessories have this model T?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: How many accessories have this model T?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Monday, November 04, 2013 - 02:11 am:

Interesting picture now on ebay.
This fine model T before 1922, many accessories, windscreen wiper in the middle of the windshield, I have not seen before.
Well this is not "PERLESS" radiator or ...?!
Bumpers
Elliptical rear window, Suflett equal to one man who came top in 1923.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brendan Doughty on Monday, November 04, 2013 - 06:45 am:

I am up to ten


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Monday, November 04, 2013 - 07:39 am:

Ake,

Thanks for posting. Based on the unequal length windshield hinges it should be a mid-1917 or later car. Ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/doc17.htm
APR 19, 1917 Acc. 78, Ford Archives
Windshield hinge (with the unequal length arms) noted.

And with the below the axle wishbone (radius rod) it would likely be before the mid part of 1919 as the new style wishbone was phased in first for Ton Trucks and closed cars and then all production. (ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/doc19.htm

APR 14, 1919 Acc. 235, Box 39, #385, Ford Archives
"From this date two distinct designs of front radius rods, together with front spring perches, right and left, one on the Model T and the other on Model TT.
"The Model TT design will be assembled beneath the axle, instead of above the axle through the spring perch as heretofore.
"Although it would be possible to use the Model T design on the Model TT, we request this be resorted to only in case of a shortage serious enough to threaten loss of production."

That would also explain why he purchased the aftermarket 5 lug demountable wheels -- the Ford 4 bolt demountables probably were not available when he purchased the car. It also was not equipped with an electric starter based on the cowl lamps.

Great photo.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Monday, November 04, 2013 - 08:11 am:

It also has the green visored headlight lenses.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, November 04, 2013 - 08:04 pm:

I think Hap has done a great job of pinning down the year of the touring. Thank you, Hap T! Hap and several others have mentioned a few of the accessories. I think I have found eleven, plus a couple that may not be considered accessories including the speedometer whose gear and cable can be seem by the right front wheel. So would a speedometer be considered an accessory or factory for 1918?
Before I post my list, another question. Any ideas why the left oil side lamp is so dark? Tail-lamp lens or sooted up?
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Monday, November 04, 2013 - 08:57 pm:

Wayne -- you are welcome. Note: The Ford specials described above were supplied until speedometers were discontinued as standard equipment during 1915. Ref:
http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/S-T.htm#spd So yes, the speedometer is also an accessory.

You are right that driver's side lamp lens is really dark -- I'm not sure why on that one.

Herb -- I'm 90% sure those are accessory headlight visors rather than the later Ford supplied green visored headlamp lens which were a flat lens. The ones in the photo above appear to out in front of the headlights to me, although I may be seeing what I want to see rather than what is actually there. Below is an illustration of those Ford 1921 lights, from Bruce's CD [available from: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/333725.html?1357665853 also in the "Vintage Ford" on the 1921 coverage].



Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 11:20 pm:

Bump.

My list.

1. Radiator and shell. Although we often use them independently nowadays, originally, most radiator shells were part of either the radiator (as with the Peerless shells) or a hood to update the look of the car. So I count the both as one. Peerless had at least four different top panels on that style low radiator shell. I think it is a Peerless honeycomb radiator and shell.

2. The cap and motometer may or may not have been bought together. But for counting purposes, I will call them One item.

3. Headlamp lenses. For the life of me, I cannot recall what the name of them is, even though I had a pair of them on my first boat-tail. I did not know that they were supposed to be painted black inside the eyebrows at the time and left them unpainted as I had gotten them. They are a nice violet color lens.

4. Bumper. I have no idea what brand, but I like it.

5. Wheels. Perlman, Firestone, they could have any of several makers name on them. I believe a few of the makers were related. I could mention the original era Firestone "Non Skid" tires. I rarely have seen such a good era photo of them. But for the sake of this list, I will consider them one and the same with the wheels even though the original tires on the front of that car were probably 30 X 3.

6. Running board tool box. A common typical era tool box. Again, many companies built ones very similar. Peerless among them. I do wonder why there is a wooden board between the tool box and running board, But I won't count it separately.

7. Side view mirror. Another common one of many.

8. Klaxon type horn. Again, many companies made ones similar to this, including Klaxon.

9. Windshield wiper. Definitely NOT one of many. I have never seen one quite like it. I zoomed in really close. It appears to fit between the lower and upper glasses and wipe both by sliding side to side using an inside handle. I think it is really neat! But I wonder if you can fold the top of the windshield back with it in place?

10. Rear curtain and window. The windows were usually sold separately, however they could not usually be put into the original rear curtain because of the size difference. Often they were sold by top and upholstery shops that would make and install the new curtain as well. Again, count as one.

11. Wishbone brace. The car has the early style over-the-axle wishbone. It also has the added brace as a safety feature (probably one of the common type angle iron ones). It was a good idea then, and a better idea now. I recommend them for early Ts.

12. Speedometer. At least it likely has a speedometer because otherwise the wheel gear and cable are somewhat pointless.

Maybe 13? When I zoomed in really close to look at the wishbone brace and speedometer gear, something else caught my eye. Something sort of small and hiding amongst the steering. It looks to be the size and shape of one end of a steering anti-rattler spring. It does not appear to be connected to the speedometer parts.

One last maybe. Not even worth a number. Something is hanging over the top of the rear door. It could be a leather or imitation (leatherette) door pull. It likely is just something sitting there.

That is my list of accessories I can see for this car. What surprises me when I zoom in and look closely? I cannot see any sign of shock absorbers. They were among the most common accessories on Ts during that era.
It is a great photo!
Thank you Ake, and all.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 11:49 pm:

Wayne,

The headlight lenses on this car are "Violet Ray" headlamp lenses.

They were a light blue glass with a "peaked" visor painted black on the inside.Apparently, there are very few remaining Violet Ray lenses that still have their original black paint.

The green visored "McBeth-Evans" after-market lenses appear to have had a fired-on paint. Whereas, the Violet Ray lenses just used a black lacquer paint which eventually peeled off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 04:33 pm:

THAT'S IT!
Thank you Mike S.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 09:38 pm:

Wayne

That 'door pull' is an aftermarket accessory leatherette arm rest. These were typical on large fancy cars in the early '20's and sizes were made for the Ford.







And I think that Ford has one more accessory, looks like the running board under the box is linoleum covered wood board, those were available aftermarket.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rion Schulze on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 10:02 pm:

Maybe the left lens is red and the right is clear indicating some sort of law enforcement vehicle. Just a shot in the dark.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Thursday, November 07, 2013 - 01:39 pm:

Wayne may have hit on this already but the rear top curtain also wraps around the sides, as the later "one-man" tops ultimately did.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Thursday, November 07, 2013 - 02:50 pm:

C. M. Wible
Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania
Design for a Headlight-Lens
Patent number: D54158
Filing date: Jul 5, 1919
Issue date: Nov 4, 1919
http://tinyurl.com/26orffu


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Thursday, November 07, 2013 - 10:31 pm:

I'd love to see the interior of the car. No telling how many state of the art accessories this driver installed, such as, a fan to keep him cool in the summer, a heater to keep him warm in the winter, a clock to tell him the time, gauges to tell him the level of the oil and the fuel, the temperature of the engine and the water and possibly a portable phonograph. etc. etc. He was obviously proud of his T. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Thursday, November 07, 2013 - 11:22 pm:

Wayne , with reference to your number 6. The wooden board between the toolbox and the running board enables one to fit the toolbox without drilling the running board. The wooden board is bolted down using longer running board and fender bolts and the toolbox is then screwed to the board from the inside.

Just for interest. My roadster has the same.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, November 08, 2013 - 01:36 am:

If you really blow up the photo you can see that the left cowl lamp lens has a darker color and some letters or a word embossed. Maybe STOP in Danish or whatever it is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, November 08, 2013 - 02:22 pm:

Allen R B,
That is an interesting idea. I hadn't considered that as a reason for the board. Most people at that time only had a hand powered drill. It would be much easier to attach the tool box through existing holes in the metal running board using a wooden board as a bridge.
I have tried to drill holes in metal with my grandfather's hand powered drill. We are SO spoiled.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


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