OT A rare nut

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: OT A rare nut
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 03:43 pm:

Sorting hardware the other day I found this odd nut, shown here between a couple of normal ones. I don't recall ever seeing one like this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 03:56 pm:

Looks like a Mexican knockoff...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul griesse--Granville,Ohio on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 05:17 pm:

Fine thread vs course thread? Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - Trenton, New Jersey on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 05:19 pm:

My wife says I'm a rare nut.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 06:40 pm:

Ahh It just needs to be cooked until it is medium well


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Wicker on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 06:42 pm:

Off a Stovebolt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 06:58 pm:

Depending on the bolt diameter, the 1928 to 1938
Ford parts book lists 16, 18, 20, 24 and 28 TPI
for that style square nuts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By michael grady on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 07:50 pm:

I wonder if it's been re-tapped?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 08:54 pm:

Also, prior to about 1900, there was no thread size or count standard for nuts and bolts. Many were still hand made by blacksmiths. Most were manufactured by companies that made them as matched sets to their own standards. There were several common near standards that different companies or individuals would work close to. Most worked close to even common fractions of an inch. It was very common for nuts and bolts to be close, but not quite fit together.
I have a bunch of old hardware, some of it belonged to my great grandfather. Fortunately, I also have some of my great grandfathers blacksmith tools and taps and dies. I sometimes have to use them to refit really old nuts and bolts.
I would not say that what you have is or is not really early or later. Just something to consider.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ex trooper on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 09:08 pm:

In modern parlance, that's called a Flint Nut, as in Flint Michigan. In later years, they were spun welded onto fenders for machine tool assembly. Wrong washered bolt and theyd break loose and spin being heck to remove inside of a fender.


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