Brake lining rivets: any good?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Brake lining rivets: any good?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 09:22 pm:

The brake linings I bought recently came with these little brass tubular rivets. After installing them, I don't like their looks. They appear pretty flimsy to me. I'm wondering if I should replace them with the split rivets used for band linings. Anybody have experience with both?




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 09:27 pm:

Mine did fine but I used a little different technique. See photos.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bruckzone/7996628089/in/set-72157631228119782

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bruckzone/7996637657/in/set-72157631228119782


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 09:28 pm:

Looks like the ones I got were a bit different design. They did work great. Came from Langs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 09:59 pm:

I would do like Erich shows in his photos. Use the correct brake rivets. Do a google search of brass brake rivets.
http://www.bigflatsrivet.com/brass_brake_lining.html

The bottom of hollow part of the rivet should be just below the surface it's being riveted to.
Put the solid head on the outside and the hollow part on the inside. I would counter sink just enough to put the head of the rivet just below the surface of the lining as it's not too thick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 10:30 pm:

I used split rivets. They, to my surprise, worked well and looked good 9 years later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Tuesday, November 05, 2013 - 10:32 pm:

Installation, prepping the lining.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bruckzone/7996712160/

The actual rivets I used.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bruckzone/7996720968/in/photostream/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 07:46 am:

Steve,

Those rivets in your pictures look like poo. I would not use them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 07:52 am:

Where can you get the "stepped" drill bit for this job?

Phil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 08:07 am:

Those rivets are not very good for the importance of the function they are being used for. They look very flimsy and the heads are not flat enough to lay below the surface of the linings so they will not be sheared off. I use the traditional copper (or brass) tubular rivets which are alot better made and stronger for such a crucial position and I countersink the face of the lining deep enough (only about a 1/32") so the head of the rivet will clear the surface of the lining. With the head on the lining side, it only stands to reason that the bradded tubular portion goes on the steel side. JIm Patrick

PS. I use the same techniques and tubular rivets for my Guinn wooden transmission linings as well. I much prefer tubular rivets over split rivets, which I feel cannot be made tight enough


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 08:18 am:

PS. As noted, you will need to make a bit for countersinking the heads of the rivets. You can use the very cheap countesink bits with the widest portion, about the same diameter as the rivet head. Bits are stamped and pressed, not the expensive machined type. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 08:23 am:

PPS. Don't forget to grind the angle flat with a Dremel tool before using. To use an angled countersink will take out the material needed to hold secure the band and I believe a stepped bit will also take out too much material, leaving only a small shelf for the rivet head to hold on to. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT BERGSTADT on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 09:15 am:

Steve we have the correct split rivets in stock, Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 11:46 am:

Whose lining did you purchase that had those rivets included ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 12:18 pm:

I got those from Lang's in September. But I expect other dealers will have them from the same supplier. I intend to give them a heads-up on this so they can come up with something sturdier. After this I'll ask about the rivets when I order linings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 01:21 pm:

I used an ice pick to punch the hole, then push the rivet through. Using a split rivet, I use a screw driver to spread the rivet. Having a piece of round bar stock mounted in my vice, I turn the band over with the split end of the rivet on the bar stock and tap the rivet till the split ends of the rivet are securely imbedded in the lining.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 07:11 pm:

Those don't even look like rivets. They look like eyelets. You should have used an eyeletter machine to set those. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, November 06, 2013 - 07:25 pm:

Steve, Jim is right, you need to replace those weird rivets with correct hollow rivets, they have the flat head to sink into the brake lining, and the hollow end is smashed to the metal brake band to secure the lining.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, November 07, 2013 - 12:00 am:

One of the most important things to know about brake lining rivets is to NEVER use steel rivets. It is not just the hardness of the steel against the brake drums. Far more important is that water (or even humidity) will get to the steel rivets and result in rust (paint won't help because the braking heat will burn it off). Iron oxide (rust) is an abrasive used on some sand papers. It flakes off the rusty rivets and becomes embedded in the linings where they grind their way through the brake drums.
Check all brake lining rivets with a magnet.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


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